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Sweating fondant

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Hello everyone,

 

I make cakes as my new hubby however I have encountered a few problems. I crumb coated my cake with betty crocker vanilla icing and then used satic iced fondant to cover the cakes my fondant teared a few places n had fine cracks n even air bubbles..I placed it in the fridge n when I took it out it looks like the cake had shrunk n when I left it outside it started sweating n running...Anyone can say where I went wrong im not a professional cake maker...

thanks..:smile:

post #2 of 7

Well the sweating fondant was most likely from when you took it out of the fridge and put it on the counter. We use that fondant where I work, and we've noticed that it has issues with sweating. Not fun. 

 

As for the tearing, it could be that it's too thick, or maybe even too thin. You have to play around with it to find the thickness that works. With air bubbles, I keep small pearl head pins in my cake box so I can pop them. I'll put a pin (one of the small sewing ones) into the bubble from the side, take it out then press out the air. That way the hole isn't noticeable from the pin.

 

The cake won't necessarily 'shrink' once you put fondant on, but it will settle, if that's what you meant. The weight of the fondant (that's one reason I like to try to keep it thin) will cause the cake to settle, making the cake look bulged on the sides. I've found a couple solutions to that on here, just from reading through the forums. 

 

Practice makes perfect!

Good luck with your new hobby!

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(¸.·´ (¸.·`¤ Whitney
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¤´¨)
¸.·´¸.·*´¨) ¸.·*¨)
(¸.·´ (¸.·`¤ Whitney
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post #3 of 7

Hi, I am a newbie, but I keep my fondant covered cakes in the fridge in a box  up on it's end with the opening facing the door,  so no condensation/moisture can settle on it.  Just slide in the cake.  Keeps it nice & dry.

 

Then when removing the cake, just remember the basic rule with all icings, COOL & DRY!  Use the AC in the summer, and keep a fan blowing on it, keeps the air moving, & keeps it, yup- cool & dry...  Keeps it from sweating when coming out of the fridge.

 

The thicker the fondant, the easier it is to cover a cake with corners.  BUT, most people don't care to eat fondant, so a thin layer is best, and it is lighter & easier to work with.  Cut off the excess as soon as you get it on the cake, before it has a chance to tear from the added weight.  You do the corners first, then do the sides, was really quite easy, even for a beginner like me.

All things 'CAKE' are rapidly becoming a very exciting & rewarding hobby for me,

but the 'grandkids' will always be my real passion.

Reply

All things 'CAKE' are rapidly becoming a very exciting & rewarding hobby for me,

but the 'grandkids' will always be my real passion.

Reply
post #4 of 7

I keep a dehumidifier running in my kitchen during humid weather.  It reduces the chance of the fondant sweating.  As for the "shrinking", always crumb coat and then chill it for at least a couple of hours to let it settle before placing fondant over it.  You will even need to smooth some bulges between layers sometimes.  As for the tears, I agree with the too thin/too thick comment above.  It is something you will need to play with to get it just right.  Also, keep a light touch when draping and smoothing it.  Patience is key! :)  Good luck in your new hobby!

"Ability is of little account without opportunity." ~ Napoleon Bonaparte
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"Ability is of little account without opportunity." ~ Napoleon Bonaparte
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post #5 of 7

Hi again,

To support the weight of the fondant, brushing or spraying on simple syrup to each cake layer will not only firm up the cake, & keep it moist at the same time, but it also adds a 'certain dimension', as one of my family were so kind as to say, to the cake flavor itself.  Seems to enhance the flavor.  They suggest you use "heavy' cakes, not light ones, when using fondant for this very reason.   I am new to all this, but learning fast, and having the time of my 'retired' life.

All things 'CAKE' are rapidly becoming a very exciting & rewarding hobby for me,

but the 'grandkids' will always be my real passion.

Reply

All things 'CAKE' are rapidly becoming a very exciting & rewarding hobby for me,

but the 'grandkids' will always be my real passion.

Reply
post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbangrl2007 View Post

Well the sweating fondant was most likely from when you took it out of the fridge and put it on the counter. We use that fondant where I work, and we've noticed that it has issues with sweating. Not fun. 

As for the tearing, it could be that it's too thick, or maybe even too thin. You have to play around with it to find the thickness that works. With air bubbles, I keep small pearl head pins in my cake box so I can pop them. I'll put a pin (one of the small sewing ones) into the bubble from the side, take it out then press out the air. That way the hole isn't noticeable from the pin.

The cake won't necessarily 'shrink' once you put fondant on, but it will settle, if that's what you meant. The weight of the fondant (that's one reason I like to try to keep it thin) will cause the cake to settle, making the cake look bulged on the sides. I've found a couple solutions to that on here, just from reading through the forums. 

Practice makes perfect!
Good luck with your new hobby!
Thanku very much for your response my next project is a Barbie cake wish me luck 😊
post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 
Thanku all for your replies does anyone have a buttercream frosting recipe I used bettycrocker frosting to crumb coat so I don't know if that's part of the problem for sweating ...
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