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Get really smooth, fondant-like buttercream? - Page 2

post #16 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by MustangMollie View Post

What is the difference between a cake board and a drum board? I don't use the cardboard cake boards, I use the harder and thicker ones that are covered in foul (made of wood maybe?).

I definitely get ridges in the bc were I stop and start with the scraper, but around the edges of the cake board the foil is folded under so the edges of the board aren't smooth. This creates ridges too.

 

I think you are using a drum board then. Cake boards are just the flimsy cardboards. The harder and thicker ones covered in foil are cake drums. People use a cardboard under the cake, and then a cake drum to sit it on (that you can cover and decorate with fondant).

 

I think your "ridges" are because you start and stop with the scraper. What you can see people doing is to hold your scraper at a starting point, put your left hand right there on the wheel and in one single motion, without stopping, turn the wheel and get to the beginning point.

post #17 of 38

Try using poster board to smooth cakes with. Buddy Valastro is the one who showed me this. It works great for me. Good luck and keep practicing!!!

post #18 of 38

You don't need paper towels or rollers or any of that stuff.  Just get a good scraper and practice.  Those of us who use a non-crusting buttercream will find that those methods don't work.  In a professional setting they just use spatulas and scrapers because there isn't time for that other stuff (and some of it isn't food-safe anyway). 

 

For me it's easier to put on way more than what I actually need and then scrape it off.  I don't even crumb coat usually.  Your turntable does most of the work-all you have to do is make sure your scraper is lined up straight on the sides.

post #19 of 38

You also have to understand that buttercream is buttercream and it might have some pock marks or spatula lifts.  I think some people spend way too much time trying to get their buttercream cakes to look like fondant.  Why?  Just use fondant!

post #20 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnnieCahill View Post
 

You also have to understand that buttercream is buttercream and it might have some pock marks or spatula lifts.  I think some people spend way too much time trying to get their buttercream cakes to look like fondant.  Why?  Just use fondant!

AnnieCahil:  Yes that a good answer to the OP.

 

 

Quote:

Yes. It's all practice, practice, practice. Here's a few more links.

 

http://store.cakedecoratingcentral.com.au/icing/ganaching/acrylic-ganache-boards.html

Imaginethatnh:   'Acrylic Ganache Boards' are what is used in that spectacular tutorial. The are sold on websites in the AU & GB but not the US.  

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~~We are living in a world today where lemonade is made from artificial flavors and furniture polish is made from real lemons. ~Alfred E. Newman
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post #21 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by MBalaska View Post
 

AnnieCahil:  Yes that a good answer to the OP.

 

 

Imaginethatnh:   'Acrylic Ganache Boards' are what is used in that spectacular tutorial. The are sold on websites in the AU & GB but not the US.  

 

I know. I couldn't find them here in the US for my sister (she makes cakes in South America). I had to send her masonite rounds. But I really want her to tell me what size her cakes shrink to so that I can have a sheet cut to different sizes at eplastics. I have a template made already to see how many rounds will fit on one of their sheets. I think it's going to be very expensive though...and that stuff is not light for shipping, here or to South America!

post #22 of 38

The ONLY way I can get my buttercream smooth, is by using the heat method.

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No his mind is not for rent, to any god or government...

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post #23 of 38

haha wow.. funny but so true... what non crusting buttercream recipe do you use?  I think ive only used the crusting recipe...ive tried soo many recipes thinking it was my recipe.. but I think its just me haha..

post #24 of 38

what do u mean please

post #25 of 38
Thread Starter 

Thanks so much for all of the responses guys! I'll keep at it ... hopefully I'll have a nicer looking crumb-coated cake pic to post soon :)

 

With the acrylic rounds, does the bottom piece of acrylic become part of the cake? If not, how would you remove it without ruining the icing?

post #26 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by MustangMollie View Post

Thanks so much for all of the responses guys! I'll keep at it ... hopefully I'll have a nicer looking crumb-coated cake pic to post soon icon_smile.gif

With the acrylic rounds, does the bottom piece of acrylic become part of the cake? If not, how would you remove it without ruining the icing?

There's always something in between. A round cardboard, not a drumboard, between cake and the acrylic for the bottom. A piece of wax paper between acrylic round and buttercream/ganache for top.
post #27 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagenthatnj View Post
 
........A round cardboard, not a drumboard, between cake and the acrylic for the bottom. A piece of wax paper between acrylic round and buttercream/ganache for top.

imagenthatnj:  whew....thanks for sharing that info.  I am sending for a couple of the small acrylic rounds to give it a try.  It would have been a disaster had I not known this.

 

leah_   wrote that they used cardboards, the technique must be similar. her cakes are tops!

~~We are living in a world today where lemonade is made from artificial flavors and furniture polish is made from real lemons. ~Alfred E. Newman
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~~We are living in a world today where lemonade is made from artificial flavors and furniture polish is made from real lemons. ~Alfred E. Newman
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post #28 of 38
Excuse me - so is it better to use crusting or non-crusting or does it matter? Is one or the other better if you Do cover w fondant? And is Crisco a high ratio shortening?
post #29 of 38
And is it imperative that one do this on something that turns? Or can you just turn the cake stand for the same effect?
post #30 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by MommyMommy View Post

And is it imperative that one do this on something that turns? Or can you just turn the cake stand for the same effect?

 

Yes. Otherwise you would be getting the vertical lines MustangMollie talked about. You even have to turn that wheel in one single long movement, no stopping. Read steps 7 and 8 here.

 

http://cakecentral.com/a/upside-down-icing-technique-for-perfectly-smooth-icing

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