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Is it easy to Add Gluten-Free items to my menu or not a good idea - Page 2

post #16 of 50

We do "gluten-free" cupcakes and cakes. It really is more "no gluten ingredients used". When we bake gluten free (which is actually every day now), we do the gluten-free batter first before opening our cake flour container. We explain to customers that is more for those that are eating gluten-free diets and not for those with celiacs. It's just like any restaurant that offers gluten-free items and that explains that it may not be 100% gluten-free. It's more for those that have intolerances compared to actual medical conditions. I leave it up to the customer to decide if it is safe for them. For instance, my best friend just recently became gluten-free for her migraines (with advice from her doctor) and she will still eat something that might have cross contamination (like french fries where breaded chicken has also been fried). 

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post #17 of 50
jason, if you don't think the weight conscious population is not an easy viable red hot mass market then i need to seriously re-think your business perspective bladeebla
 
i do not accept your patronization

if you had your own tv show what would be your favorite commercial/sponsor

i think i'd like ghirardelli and hershey for starters...

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if you had your own tv show what would be your favorite commercial/sponsor

i think i'd like ghirardelli and hershey for starters...

Reply
post #18 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheSugarLab View Post

We do "gluten-free" cupcakes and cakes. It really is more "no gluten ingredients used". When we bake gluten free (which is actually every day now), we do the gluten-free batter first before opening our cake flour container. We explain to customers that is more for those that are eating gluten-free diets and not for those with celiacs.

Interesting...how successful have the gluten-free products been? My worry would be someone with Celiac seeing "gluten-free" and not checking the fine print, then bashing your business after getting glutened. I suppose if you verbally remind customers that your gluten-free products may contain traces of gluten this would be less of an issue.
post #19 of 50

hence the 'gluten light' moniker

 

four decades ago i had a co-worker point out that i needed some "mucousless' desserts for the line--homemade applesauce, fruity things etc. it's not at all a new concept. just new buzz words.

if you had your own tv show what would be your favorite commercial/sponsor

i think i'd like ghirardelli and hershey for starters...

Reply

if you had your own tv show what would be your favorite commercial/sponsor

i think i'd like ghirardelli and hershey for starters...

Reply
post #20 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by -K8memphis View Post

jason, if you don't think the weight conscious population is not an easy viable red hot mass market then i need to seriously re-think your business perspective bladeebla

There are certainly ways to market to people looking to lose weight, but I would prefer marketing solutions that actually contribute toward weight loss. For example, paleo cakes that are high in protein and low on the glycemic index are something I would be comfortable marketing to someone looking to lose weight.
post #21 of 50

Anything with a high flour content is going to have high calories as well.  However, it wouldn't make sense for people who are counting calories to just cut out wheat and nothing else- the 2-4 cups of sugar are going to have more calories than the flour.

 

K8, congrats on the weight loss!  I've just lost 30 lbs myself.  Haven't gone gluten free but I did give up drinking pop a few months ago.  Also cut out aspartame and counting calories. It was tough at first but now I feel so much better.

post #22 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by MeghanKelly View Post
 

Anything with a high flour content is going to have high calories as well.  However, it wouldn't make sense for people who are counting calories to just cut out wheat and nothing else- the 2-4 cups of sugar are going to have more calories than the flour.

 

K8, congrats on the weight loss!  I've just lost 30 lbs myself.  Haven't gone gluten free but I did give up drinking pop a few months ago.  Also cut out aspartame and counting calories. It was tough at first but now I feel so much better.

thank you, meghan, and right back atcha multiplied congratulations!! no easy feat--

 

was hoping it would help with some arthritis but at least i look better--hahahaha ;)

 

can't have it all but we try  :lol: 

if you had your own tv show what would be your favorite commercial/sponsor

i think i'd like ghirardelli and hershey for starters...

Reply

if you had your own tv show what would be your favorite commercial/sponsor

i think i'd like ghirardelli and hershey for starters...

Reply
post #23 of 50

As of August, there are federal standards for gluten free: https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2013/08/05/2013-18813/food-labeling-gluten-free-labeling-of-foods. I cringe when I hear that someone is going to "try a gluten free cake" to sell. If that is all the research you have done, stay out of the gluten-free market! Cross contamination is a real issue for those with Celiac and other related conditions, and it can be deadly for them. There can be gluten hiding on your walls, in your sifter, on your countertops, your fondant mats and tools, in your baking powder, etc. etc. My husband has Celiac disease, and on the rare occasions that we eat out, he gets sick afterward. Even though he eats from the "gluten-free menu," the cross-contamination is enough to get to him. I bake only gluten free and only from scratch, and right now I have 37 different gluten-free flours in my cupboard. There were many flat, gooey, dry, foul tasting and just plain nasty failures before finding recipes and procedures that worked.  My cakes are delicious, and if a customer can detect that it is gluten free, it gets taken off the menu. So, please don't "dabble" in gluten free. You are risking someone's health.

post #24 of 50
I bake gluten free in a co-op kitchen. I come to work in the morning, before anyone else, and start my work. The owner told me that the kitchen air must be still for a minimum of 8 hours before working gluten free. I have to wash everything before I use it, and every ingredient that I use stays on its own carts, and backstock has it's own shelves/containers to be stored.
We still must label each item with the disclaimer that the product was manufactured in shared equipment.
That probably doesn't answer any questions, or help much; it's just a few of the precautions I have to take to make the product.
post #25 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carrie789 View Post

As of August, there are federal standards for gluten free: https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2013/08/05/2013-18813/food-labeling-gluten-free-labeling-of-foods. I cringe when I hear that someone is going to "try a gluten free cake" to sell. If that is all the research you have done, stay out of the gluten-free market! Cross contamination is a real issue for those with Celiac and other related conditions, and it can be deadly for them. There can be gluten hiding on your walls, in your sifter, on your countertops, your fondant mats and tools, in your baking powder, etc. etc. My husband has Celiac disease, and on the rare occasions that we eat out, he gets sick afterward. Even though he eats from the "gluten-free menu," the cross-contamination is enough to get to him. I bake only gluten free and only from scratch, and right now I have 37 different gluten-free flours in my cupboard. There were many flat, gooey, dry, foul tasting and just plain nasty failures before finding recipes and procedures that worked.  My cakes are delicious, and if a customer can detect that it is gluten free, it gets taken off the menu. So, please don't "dabble" in gluten free. You are risking someone's health.
I like you. Want a stalker?
post #26 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture View Post


I like you. Want a stalker?


I second this, well, without the stalking.

post #27 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by scrumdiddlycakes View Post


I second this, well, without the stalking.
Chicken. Nothing says I love you like a restraining order.
post #28 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carrie789 View Post
 

As of August, there are federal standards for gluten free: https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2013/08/05/2013-18813/food-labeling-gluten-free-labeling-of-foods. I cringe when I hear that someone is going to "try a gluten free cake" to sell. If that is all the research you have done, stay out of the gluten-free market! Cross contamination is a real issue for those with Celiac and other related conditions, and it can be deadly for them. There can be gluten hiding on your walls, in your sifter, on your countertops, your fondant mats and tools, in your baking powder, etc. etc. My husband has Celiac disease, and on the rare occasions that we eat out, he gets sick afterward. Even though he eats from the "gluten-free menu," the cross-contamination is enough to get to him. I bake only gluten free and only from scratch, and right now I have 37 different gluten-free flours in my cupboard. There were many flat, gooey, dry, foul tasting and just plain nasty failures before finding recipes and procedures that worked.  My cakes are delicious, and if a customer can detect that it is gluten free, it gets taken off the menu. So, please don't "dabble" in gluten free. You are risking someone's health.

Thank you! The number of people who say that they bake gluten free because they wipe their equipment down between batches of regular and gluten free products is ridiculous around here.

post #29 of 50
I agree with not 'dabbling' in gluten free baking. I'm not super well versed in gluten free because, well, I just don't want to do it. There are too many opportunities to really do some damage to someone with a real allergy. I'm not prepared for that responsibility. I practice good cleaning habits, and follow whatever rules that were put into place by my boss to be as gluten free as possible. I don't think I can get completely gluten free where I work, and it drives me nuts. But there's not a lot I can do about it when he says we are following the rules.
Although- correct me if I'm wrong - isn't there a certification that a kitchen needs to be deemed completely gluten free?
post #30 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture View Post


Chicken. Nothing says I love you like a restraining order.


I like stalkers. Better than no attention at all. :D

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