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Ganaching methods

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

I've seen several tutorials for ganaching cakes, most of which refer to the upside down method, spreading the ganache with a bakers blade evenly between two cake boards.  I tried the method for the first time tonight with fair success.  Aside from the fact I misjudged the amount of ganache needed for a small 6" cake, the only real problem was the removal of the top cake board.  Despite using a warm offset spatula to separate the board from the ganached surface,the board peeled off every bit of ganache from the top.  

 

Here's my question - before folks started using 2 cake boards, wouldn't ganache have been smoothed out much like buttercream?  Why couldn't I just hold the blade perpendicular to the bottom board, exercising great care to keep the blade straight up and down as I move around the cake?  Why the additional step of adding the second cake board, which, even with the pros, leaves divots and air bubbles after it has been removed?

post #2 of 10
You can definitely use the method you described, keeping your bench scraper or whatever tool you like. I don't use the upside method, but mines similar I just place a board on top rather then flipping the cake upside down (always made me nervous)!
Whatever method you use will take practice so don't get discouraged! I try to make my top coat as level as possible from the beginning and usually have to go over some imperfections when I'm finished but not many, it's just a personal preference for me.

I'm surprised all your ganache came off with your board. Did you make sure your ganache was setup? And run the warm spatula all around before removing? Was the ganache a peanut butter consistency when you applied it? These could have contributed to your problems. I just love using ganache, I'll attach a tutorial that might help. I believe she uses the method you mentioned.
post #3 of 10
http://inspiredbymichelleblog.com/2011/03/30/how-to-make-chocolate-ganache-for-decorating-cakes-3/

It's the link to the second tutorial that I was referring to, hopefully this will help
post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 

I think there were a couple of things working against me today -  1.  I'm in a new space, still adjusting to the smaller size of the kitchen.  2.  The weather took a turn for hotter and more humid today.  That's always a problem in my area but a kitchen of this size heats up so quickly.  Truth be told, my ganache was just a tad shy of the peanut butter stage.  

 

I've watched Michelle's videos today but didn't review again today.  Thanks for reminding me of her videos.  I love that she works without tricks or unnecessary steps.  She gets right to the heart of the matter, and with great results.  I'll try again when the weather cools in a few weeks.  Thank you for the help.

post #5 of 10

I use a sheet of baking paper between the ganache and the top board. There's still some divets, but once it's set in the frdige for 10 minutes or so, it's easy to fill in any holes and scrape the excess off.

post #6 of 10
http://www.notquitenigella.com/2010/11/04/how-to-make-a-two-tier-wedding-cake-with-faye-cahill/

This is typically how I do it, sometimes without the top, usually with but it does have that extra board though. Waxed or parchment paper would be a good idea (don't they usually use that in the upside down method)? Regardless it should help.

Yes, I love Michelle's work! You really don't need tons of tools to make a nice cake and she always has the sharpest edges.
post #7 of 10

I tried covering a cake in ganache today, and found it was lovely to work with - went on really well and seemed to smooth beautifully.  However, when it came time to cover it with fondant, the result is awful!  It is showing up every tiny little bump and won't smooth away like I used to do with buttercream. 

 

What am I doing wrong?  When I finished ganaching it looked smoother than I would normally get with buttercream, but do I have to keep going until it is completely perfect?  That would take so long!
 

post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by LizzieAylett View Post

I tried covering a cake in ganache today, and found it was lovely to work with - went on really well and seemed to smooth beautifully.  However, when it came time to cover it with fondant, the result is awful!  It is showing up every tiny little bump and won't smooth away like I used to do with buttercream. 

 

What am I doing wrong?  When I finished ganaching it looked smoother than I would normally get with buttercream, but do I have to keep going until it is completely perfect?  That would take so long!
 

After you've finished with your ganache, get a glass of very hot water, dip your spatula in, wipe it off with a paper towel and go around the ganache again to smooth all the bumps away. Google "hot knife ganache" and there will be tutorials that come up that show step by step. I'm on my phone so I can't cut and paste. ;)

Let's eat grandma. Let's eat, grandma. Punctuation saves lives.
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Let's eat grandma. Let's eat, grandma. Punctuation saves lives.
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post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neophyte View Post
Despite using a warm offset spatula to separate the board from the ganached surface,the board peeled off every bit of ganache from the top. 

Encountered the same problem until I realized I forgot one important step that some of the tutorials showed-- tape a clean sheet of wax paper to that second board. When you are ready to lift that board, first untape (is that a real word? haha...) the wax paper from the board. Take the board off the cake. Then now, carefully peel the wax paper from the surface of the cake. Makes for a lot smoother surface. Hope it helps!

post #10 of 10

Thanks, Six, I will try that next time :-)
 

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