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First Real Cake Order... Help?!

post #1 of 63
Thread Starter 

I have a co-worker whose daughter is turning two in August and she has asked me to make an Elmo cake. She needs to serve approximately 60 people. I found the full body Elmo cake pan and discussed that that pan would not feed 60 people. I am going to make a sheet cake on the side for her to serve the rest of the guests. Both cakes are going to look “furry” like Elmo, layered with strawberry buttercream icing. The Elmo cake pan is not much bigger than a 9x13 pan. Any suggestions on how large the sheet cake should be? Do I need to use dowels or will it stay put if it is level?

 

**I am not charging for the Elmo cake, just the sheet cake**

post #2 of 63

You can get an 11x15 pan from Wilton at Michaels or Joanns. I would put at least 2 dowels in to hold the Elmo from sliding while you transport. With the 2 tiers, this should feed 60 easily.

post #3 of 63

i would skip the special Elmo pan. It doesnt give you anything that a printed image won't. I would make two 9x13 cakes and put them together (trim so that the ends match up), crumb coat and outline your image with a toothpick , then decorate with the same technique. If you can't eyeball the inner lines, just cut the image apart or poke thru the paper with your pick. 

 

this is how i did all my son's birthday cakes. before I turned pro. 

post #4 of 63

I would use an 11 x 15 sheet cake and place the elmo cake on it (like a tier)  I think it would give a cohesive look.

post #5 of 63
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynne3 View Post

I would use an 11 x 15 sheet cake and place the elmo cake on it (like a tier)  I think it would give a cohesive look.

That is really cute!! Thank you for the idea. My biggest concern is making sure I have enough to serve 60 people and the cake doesn't fall apart on my way there. I will not be cutting the cake for her, should I give her a paper with how big each piece should be? I'm kind of in shock how quickly this all came about.... Can you tell?! icon_surprised.gif

post #6 of 63

If you place the elmo cake on the sheet cake, stack it like you would any tiered cake.  

Dowels in bottom sheet, and elmo on a cake board that rests on the bottom dowels.  

Make sure to put icing on the underside of the Elmo cake to help adhere it to the board.

 

Refrigerate well and transport very cold.

You can get a sheet cake box that holds in the coolness.

post #7 of 63
Don't forget to get written permission from Sesame Workshop to use Elmo's likeness for commercial purposes, otherwise you'll have to stick to licensed toppers.
post #8 of 63
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft View Post

Don't forget to get written permission from Sesame Workshop to use Elmo's likeness for commercial purposes, otherwise you'll have to stick to licensed toppers.

This was another concern. Which is why I was going to do the two cakes seperately. Give her the Elmo cake and only charge for the sheet cake. I also don't have a formal business, I am not leaving my name or any business name with the cake. Does that make a difference?

post #9 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by newbe86 View Post

This was another concern. Which is why I was going to do the two cakes seperately. Give her the Elmo cake and only charge for the sheet cake. I also don't have a formal business, I am not leaving my name or any business name with the cake. Does that make a difference?

To avoid copyright infringement you still need permission to reproduce a copyrighted character, regardless of whether or not you charge for it. The fact that you are aware of this issue and are trying to circumvent it by giving the Elmo cake for "free" (would the Elmo cake still be free if the customer decided they didn't need the sheet cake?) is actually worse because it demonstrates malicious intent instead of just ignorance of the law.
post #10 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft View Post


To avoid copyright infringement you still need permission to reproduce a copyrighted character, regardless of whether or not you charge for it. 

I thought you would only get into trouble if you charge for it/benefit from it another way? If she buys the Elmo pan, bakes the cake, and gives the cake away, she'll still be infringing? Why do they even make character pans then if you then have to write and ask if you can use it?

post #11 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayti View Post

I thought you would only get into trouble if you charge for it/benefit from it another way? If she buys the Elmo pan, bakes the cake, and gives the cake away, she'll still be infringing? Why do they even make character pans then if you then have to write and ask if you can use it?

Character cake pans are typically for personal use only, which means you can bake a cake for yourself or your family, bring it to a friend's party, etc. You cannot sell the cake.

If OP was bringing the cake to the co-worker's party as a friend and not charging her for the sheet cake it might be more defensible, but this is obviously a commercial transaction despite the OP's attempt to hide that fact.
post #12 of 63

But it could be argued that giving away the Elmo cake, while charging for the sheet cake on the same order, amounts to splitting hairs, and that if one didn't "give away" the Elmo cake, one would not be able to charge as much for a sheet cake on the same order.

James H. H. Lampert
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Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

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James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

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post #13 of 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by hbquikcomjamesl View Post

But it could be argued that giving away the Elmo cake, while charging for the sheet cake on the same order, amounts to splitting hairs, and that if one didn't "give away" the Elmo cake, one would not be able to charge as much for a sheet cake on the same order.

Bingo. Unlike in Hollywood, using a clever scheme when breaking the law tends to make things worse. It's like trying to get around health dept laws that regulate the commercial sale of food by selling a simple cake stand for $500 that happens to include a free 4-tier wedding cake.
post #14 of 63
The 6 Ps Law states Proper Preparation Prevents Pi$$ Poor Performance.

-Mr. Morganti
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The 6 Ps Law states Proper Preparation Prevents Pi$$ Poor Performance.

-Mr. Morganti
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post #15 of 63

Playing at being above the law is an expensive game. Unless you're a multi-national corporation that has either the money to hire armies of lawyers, or the power to bring national governments to their knees, you can't afford it.

James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

Reply

James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

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