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Do you provide clients with cakes that feed exactly their guest count?

post #1 of 38
Thread Starter 

Hello all! I just came to the realization that I have been making cakes for customers for exactly the number of guests they have attending an event. Some threads/forums, however, say cakes should be made to feed less than the guest count as not everyone takes a serving of cake. This has prompted me to ask, am I going about the this the wrong way?!
 

What do you offer clients and customers? Do you suggest a cake should feed a certain percentage less than the guest count or create cakes exactly the size needed to feed exactly the guests anticipated to attend? 

Look forward to hearing your opinions! 

 

post #2 of 38
I recommend that customers order more servings than guests in case anyone wants seconds, unless other desserts will also be served at the event.
post #3 of 38

I never suggest making less cake than there will be guests, I've attended two weddings where they ran out of cake, kinda sucks being in line and being told, "sorry, no cake for you".

Not to mention, the couples were really embarrassed.

post #4 of 38

If I know, and I ask point blank too, that there will be heavy partying at the bar, then I suggest about 80% of the expected count. Sometimes, I suggest 100% of the count, and sometimes more. Just depends.

"I can do that, because this is my sandbox and I've got the bullsh*% shovel." ~Dianne Sylvan, Author and Lunatic
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"I can do that, because this is my sandbox and I've got the bullsh*% shovel." ~Dianne Sylvan, Author and Lunatic
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
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post #5 of 38

i have had brides purposefully order a cake too small like by half or more because that's all they could afford and when it runs out it runs out--that mighta been one of the lines you were in, scrumdiddly ;)

 

i just make what they pay for

my cookies are prettier than your cookies because this is the second time i substituted my opalescent sanding sugar when i ran out of sugar to make the batch ha!

 

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my cookies are prettier than your cookies because this is the second time i substituted my opalescent sanding sugar when i ran out of sugar to make the batch ha!

 

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post #6 of 38

I always told brides to order the same number of servings of cake as the number of plates of food/beverages/chairs.  Why should cake be different?  Especially if they want the caterer to cut and plate and the servers to deliver the dessert to the tables.  Then you really do have to have a serving to put in front of each guest.  I have even been so snarky as to ask if they think all the guests will be bringing gifts?  Then why would you short your guests on food?

 

Worst case scenario is leftover cake.  And that's not a bad thing at all.

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Answers to the most often asked questions re: SPS. SPS instructions are on Page 15 of the Sticky at the top of the Cake Decorating Forum. Supplies can be ordered from Oasis Supply, Global or BakeryCrafts.
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post #7 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s View Post

I always told brides to order the same number of servings of cake as the number of plates of food/beverages/chairs.  Why should cake be different?  Especially if they want the caterer to cut and plate and the servers to deliver the dessert to the tables.  Then you really do have to have a serving to put in front of each guest.  I have even been so snarky as to ask if they think all the guests will be bringing gifts?  Then why would you short your guests on food?

 

Worst case scenario is leftover cake.  And that's not a bad thing at all.

 

 

bwuwahahahaha--love a good snark story

my cookies are prettier than your cookies because this is the second time i substituted my opalescent sanding sugar when i ran out of sugar to make the batch ha!

 

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my cookies are prettier than your cookies because this is the second time i substituted my opalescent sanding sugar when i ran out of sugar to make the batch ha!

 

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post #8 of 38

When giving a quote, I give a few options for tier sizes around their expected turnout and recommend rounding up. Better to have too much cake then not enough!

post #9 of 38

I ask these questions: Will there be another dessert? Is there going to be an open bar? Are your guests big cake eaters or more of a drinking crowd? Are you doing a candy or cookie table? Based on that kind of thing I recommend 80% plus or minus some of the number of guests for the number of cake servings, Not everyone has cake after a full meal, drinking and dancing, and there's absolutely no reason to provide 100% of the number of guests for the number of cake servings unless the cake is the only thing people will be eating. If they want to order more than what I'm suggesting that's fine, but I tell them that they'll probably have cake left over, which for some people is good, but some would prefer not to pay for something they're not going to eat.

 

There are also some kinds of weddings where there's so much food there's no way that people are all going to be eating cake. Indian weddings come to mind, but I ask about the food too in most cases. The venue managers who I talk to say that when the brides order a serving per guest they always end up with half the bottom tier left over. I can't see running out of cake unless you only buy half the number of serving compared to guests, which would be too low anyway. Most venues cut the cake smaller than we think they do, so you end up getting more servings out of the cake, too.

post #10 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar View Post
The venue managers who I talk to say that when the brides order a serving per guest they always end up with half the bottom tier left over.

I'm always surprised when I hear this... the venue should be smart enough to know to serve the largest tiers first because smaller leftover tiers are easier to box, bring home, and freeze!

post #11 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWR41 View Post

I'm always surprised when I hear this... the venue should be smart enough to know to serve the largest tiers first because smaller leftover tiers are easier to box, bring home, and freeze!
The venue employees are also smart enough to know that if all the cake is served there won't be any for the venue employees to box, bring home, and freeze. icon_wink.gif
post #12 of 38
The Leland Awards cake worked out to just enough cake for everybody who wanted a piece to get one, with maybe one or two people getting seconds, and my dairy-allergic fellow docent getting her made-to-order dairy-free cupcake (literally the only cupcake I've ever made).

James H. H. Lampert
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Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

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James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

Reply
post #13 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by CWR41 View Post

I'm always surprised when I hear this... the venue should be smart enough to know to serve the largest tiers first because smaller leftover tiers are easier to box, bring home, and freeze!

 

There's an idiot baker in town who goes around telling venues how to cut the cake. He says to start at the top and work your way down so that you don't have to disassemble the cake while you cut it. I suspect that a lot of people do it that way because they can serve the cake from the cake table without moving it into the kitchen first. Jason might be right about the extras in thkitchen, too. I once had a country club call me from the kitchen while they were cutting the cake and plating it up to tell me that it was the best cake they ever had, and they almost didn't want to send it out to the guests. I thought oh, that's so nice of them to call to tell me that, then I realized that it meant the staff was in the kitchen eating the cake before they even gave it to the guests!

post #14 of 38

I worked at a fairly dodgy wedding venue when I was at uni, and the boss used to cut a big slab off the cake and take it home before serving the guests.

post #15 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by hbquikcomjamesl View Post

The Leland Awards cake worked out to just enough cake for everybody who wanted a piece to get one, with maybe one or two people getting seconds, and my dairy-allergic fellow docent getting her made-to-order dairy-free cupcake (literally the only cupcake I've ever made).

 

awesome james, any pictures?

 

'just enough' is code for 'ate all gone' ;)

 

such a thoughtful nice touch to have a dairy free cupcake for your allergic friend

 

very cool

my cookies are prettier than your cookies because this is the second time i substituted my opalescent sanding sugar when i ran out of sugar to make the batch ha!

 

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my cookies are prettier than your cookies because this is the second time i substituted my opalescent sanding sugar when i ran out of sugar to make the batch ha!

 

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