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Let's talk French Macarons - Page 4

post #46 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by KakeMistress


and as my husband says you cant be good at anything,



He'd better NOT say that to, or your CakeCentral buddies will jump to your defense!!! icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif
post #47 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by JGMB

Quote:
Originally Posted by KakeMistress


and as my husband says you cant be good at anything,



He'd better NOT say that to, or your CakeCentral buddies will jump to your defense!!! icon_lol.gificon_lol.gif



LMAO I ment EVERYthing. I probably had him and my daughter talking to me at the same time and I wasnt really paying attention.

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post #48 of 58
I've been making macarons for awhile now and have had moderate success but they have not been perfect. I usually get them to either look perfect on the outside but a little hollow on the inside (using a silpat) or they're perfect on the inside but misshapen on the outside (parchment that puckers). Has anyone tried "reusable parchment" for macarons? I see it on Amazon and am intrigued. It seems to be a cross between a silpat and parchment? Any advice would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!
post #49 of 58
I have mastered a recipe, but now I don't know how to package them! Any ideas?
To baking be true!
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To baking be true!
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post #50 of 58
You can package them in fancy gift boxes. Just wrap or put them on top of foodsafe paper. There are tons of sites offering boxes in bulk. I found some that match my regular packaging.
post #51 of 58
there is a recipie on cake journal that looks good
post #52 of 58

Does anyone know the best way to make a macaron tower?  I've seen them stuck to styrofoam with toothpicks, but that doesn't seem like a good idea. Thanks for your help!

post #53 of 58

After I tried them out of town for the first time I decided I had to be able to make them, since no one where I live was making them at the time. I did a lot of reading up on them, and it does seem over whelming at first but it's not that difficult. I find that these are the most important factors when making them:
 

  1. Use finely ground almond flour and make sure you sift it. If you let big bits of almond get into it you will have cookie lookalike macs. Another point is that when the ground almond particles are big they don't trap the liquid well. This often causes an ugly macaron "foot" that sticks out at the bottom.
  2. Don't use almond flour that looks oily - store it in the freezer or a cool dry place.
  3. I sift my icing sugar into the sifted almonds, then whisk the 2 together and sift in small batches into another bowl. This combines it pretty well and means you don't have to sift it another 4 times to mix it properly.
  4. Don't overheat or underheat your syrup for the meringue. Underheat it, and your Macaron's bottom half may not stay attached and your macarons shell will not stay crisp for long. Overheat it, and your macarons won't flatten out nicely leaving a possibly lumpy top part. 
  5. Let them dry out a bit. I normally let them sit for about 30 to 40 minutes first, and then put them into an oven preheated to 220 degrees C and switch the oven off. It only needs about 11 minutes and then pop the oven onto a low temp eg 145 -150C for another 14 minutes.
  6. Piping with the right technique will save you a lot of heartache. Bluehue recommended using a traced stencil of sorts which will help a lot. You could also permanently mark your macaron trays with a non toxic marker which will save you those additional 5 minutes each time you make macarons.
  7. I don't wet the counter when I pull the sheets of baked macarons onto it. I find that it you just allow the macarons to cool right down before moving them, they come off clean by themselves.
post #54 of 58

Hi I know this is a little late in answering but I just found this site I thought you might like for boxes for Macarons...

brpboxshop.com

post #55 of 58
Just stumbled upon this thread....I have never mad macarons, but have been fascinated by them. I was wondering...could you use the containers of egg whites that you can buy in the store, instead of cracking eggs? Just curious....

"When you look at a cupcake, you've got to smile." ~ Anne Byrn

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"When you look at a cupcake, you've got to smile." ~ Anne Byrn

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post #56 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by havealittle View Post

Just stumbled upon this thread....I have never mad macarons, but have been fascinated by them. I was wondering...could you use the containers of egg whites that you can buy in the store, instead of cracking eggs? Just curious....

 

Nope. Pasteurized egg whites won't make a fluffy meringue. They just don't inflate. 

 

Does anyone have a tip for adding the right amount of food coloring? I used red and my cookies were barely pink after baking

post #57 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by ellavanilla View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by havealittle View Post

Just stumbled upon this thread....I have never mad macarons, but have been fascinated by them. I was wondering...could you use the containers of egg whites that you can buy in the store, instead of cracking eggs? Just curious....

 

Nope. Pasteurized egg whites won't make a fluffy meringue. They just don't inflate. 

 

Does anyone have a tip for adding the right amount of food coloring? I used red and my cookies were barely pink after baking

I always use pasteurized egg whites (don't want to waste yolks) and have no trouble making macarons.  I agree with your comment about not getting a fluffy meringue, but the egg whites do deflate when they are mixed with the almond flour... maybe thats why some of us still have luck with pasteurized whites?

 

Powdered food coloring should help.  I got a nice shade of blue that way

post #58 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennicake View Post
 

I always use pasteurized egg whites (don't want to waste yolks) and have no trouble making macarons.  I agree with your comment about not getting a fluffy meringue, but the egg whites do deflate when they are mixed with the almond flour... maybe thats why some of us still have luck with pasteurized whites?

 

Powdered food coloring should help.  I got a nice shade of blue that way

 

 

I"m going to try both, thank you!

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