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DOUBLE LAYER SHEET CAKE HELP!

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
I have to do an 11x15 sheet cake for my nephews 13th birthday this weekend. I need more height than the 2 inches the pan makes. I have never "double" layered a cake that size....any suggestions? Do i use dowels? Is this possible without too much trouble?? any help and suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance to everyone

Marianne
post #2 of 21
It will be fine. I've doubled 12 x 18 with no problems. I would just suggest using a thicker filling so it doesn't slide around. You don't need dowels if you are not stacking.

HTH
post #3 of 21
I have doubled a sheet cake before and it came out extremely tall. The next time I needed one I simply added more batter to my pan to make the cake a little more taller than normal. I liked that way better and it was easier to work with.

For instance, a 9x13 pan usually takes 1 boxed mix. I use 1 1/2 to get the taller cake. Its a bit of a waste of mix but you could always use the extra for a few cupcakes or something.
post #4 of 21
I would bake 2 of them. Level the tops, add filling and put the other one on top. Should be fine. I know the tops of mine are domed (i have a crappy pan) so I'd definitely have to level them, but if yours are already flat, you're good to go.
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post #5 of 21
I did a double sheet cake and it worked out fine. Very heavy but fine. It was very tall: see my Maxine Cake in my photos.
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post #6 of 21
BTW, I used ganache filling and I did not use dowels. HTH
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post #7 of 21
I make that cake all of the time. It is my standard family birthday cake. It works well. If you want height, that's the way to go. Make layers ahead and freeze individually. They are so much easier to work with then. No cracking or crumb worries. No dowels necessary.

One warning, do not use cardboard for the cake. Get foamboard at Walmart or craft store and cover with foil. The thinnest works and is so much more stable than cardboard.
post #8 of 21
Thread Starter 
thank you all so much. I have never heard of foam board...do you think I can get that at Michaels? There are no Walmarts around me (if you can believe that)!!!!

Also, I have to travel this cake about 15 miles....still no dowels then??? Just double checking.

I will bake the layers tonight then per suggestion and freeze them. thanks for the tip.

I appreciate your help!

Mar
post #9 of 21
Ok i'm going to come completely clean.

This is a do-ahead cake. I make it about ten times a year for birthdays at home and my wife's work. She doesn't understand why there is a brake pedal in her car so I can assure you, you don't need dowels and it will transport well.

Get the foamboard at michael's. Cardboard can bend along those lines it has under the weight of a cake like this. Cut it to be bigger than the pan. cover with a cake foil. If I remember, cutting it in half should work perfectly. If your frosting is OK in the freezer, this is a cake that you can crumbcoat and freeze. I have even made this completely decorated and frozen it. It needs about six hours at room temp to defrost, or overnight. Always defrost uncovered to let condensation out.

If you are not sure about your frosting in the freezer, just freeze the layers individually and continue with you method.

Have all of the confidence in the world that this will work. It does.
post #10 of 21
I don't do single layer cakes, so the sheetcakes are all double layer, but I make the layers thinner. 4 inch sheetcake just looks odd in my opinion, so I try to hit somewhere between 2.5-3 inches in height. I don't do any dowels, it's not really necessary. Any size past 9x13, the layers really need to be refrigerated as a minimum, frozen maybe even better. Otherwise they may break on you when you try to work with them. Also, I don't use foamcore, it's too expensive here. I just went to Lowe's and found me a sturdy MFD board, it was about $6.00 for a sheet. I got them to cut it in rectangles just a tick smaller than my boxes. It ended up 6 boards out of one sheet. I then wrap them in white contact paper. The cake is placed on regular cake board (glued with icing) that it does not slide on the board and then the cake board is taped with packing tape to the MFD. Once it's placed in the box, the cake is secured in the middle of the box, so even if the box slides, the cake does not get hurt. I also noticed that alot of people grab the cake by the sides instead of the bottom which causes unsturdy board to give and cause cracks in the icing. MFD prevents that as it's does not give even under the heaviest cake I've done. Good luck, P
post #11 of 21
Long before any of us decided to learn to make "decorated" cakes, we made 2-layer cakes all the time and never doweled it. Just because it's a longer cake, doens't mean it's a heavier cake that needs dowels in it. The weight per square inch in a 12x18 cake is the same as the weight per square in on a 6" square cake.

no dowels.
post #12 of 21
Thread Starter 
thanks everyone. As always I can count on you to help me when I'm in need!
I read the several suggestions of freezing or refrigerating prior to filling etc....... I was planning on a buttercream(indydebis of course) and then covering with MMF....I've never covered a chilled cake with fondant...can I do this with no problem?

Take care everyone
Mar
post #13 of 21
And since nobody mentioned this yet... You don't need as much cake if you have 2 full layers - that's TWIVCE as much cake! so they won't need a big 2x2x4" piece. Just something to keep in mind.
post #14 of 21
I have done several two layer 1/4 sheet cakes for family and friends. I bake one recipe take out and let cool while baking the next recipe. I level the cakes which is very important when stacking. I never have used the cardboard for sheet cakes because it just isn't strong enough without something else under it. I just use my tempered glass cutting board no cake board...LOL
LL
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post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by matthewkyrankelly

If your frosting is OK in the freezer, this is a cake that you can crumbcoat and freeze. I have even made this completely decorated and frozen it. It needs about six hours at room temp to defrost, or overnight. Always defrost uncovered to let condensation out.




If you defrost a cake wrapped, condensation will not get on the cake ito begin with.
Condensation does not come from the cake. It comes from moisture in the air in the room around the cake. Moisture in the warmer air of the room is drawn to the cooler object (the cake) where it will gather and condense on its surface. If a cake is wrapped, the moisture from the air will condense on the outside of the wrapping. If a cake is uncovered, the moisture from the air will condense on the cake itself.
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