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Can i ice a cake with royal icing?

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
I want to ice a cake in Royal icing and i havnet done it so far..
I read it will be very hard. Is there anything that i can add to make it lil softer.. Should i apply anything on teh cake before i apply the royal icing?

Also can anyone give me a good royal icing recipe which tastes good?


Lisha icon_biggrin.gif
post #2 of 26
Sorry I can't help on making it softer but I know you won't be able to get it very smooth with royal icing. Is there a particular reason you want to use royal to frost the cake?
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A balanced diet is chocolate in both hands!
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post #3 of 26
I may be wrong but I think Royal Icing is not toxic but isn't recommended to eat.

I use Royal Icing for my dummy cakes because once it drys you can move it, bump it and it stays in place.

Our local decorating shop has a dummy cake done in Royal Icing that has been there over 25 yrs.
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post #4 of 26
Thread Starter 
I'm from India and i have fond memories of xmas fruit ckae iced with royal icing. So i just wanted to duplicte it..
Hmm i didnt know it was hard to smooth..
post #5 of 26
It is all sugar and egg whites .. why isn't it recommended for eating ?
Is it health reasons ? because of all the sugar ? all icing have a lot of sugar..that is probably one characteristic of icing or frosting.

RI is usually used in decorating sugar cookies. Isn't Royal Icing very popular in icing cakes in Great Britain ? I think I've heard that somewhere. I don't see why you can't. Just add less sugar so it won't be too stiff and won't get too hard. icon_smile.gif
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post #6 of 26
I have done this but back in the days when I didnt know better lol I did it on a pony cake for my daughter and although it looked nice it was hard to cut as the RI kept cracking but all the kids loved it cause it tasted more like candy than icing. Now I use it to do things like the eyes or small things like feet or such that way when I cut it I cut where the bc is and the kids still get that candy part if they want.
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Darlene
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post #7 of 26
lishajijo:

I would check out Ron Ben Isarel or Toba Garrett books. They both add a little piping gel to the Royal Icing so it won't shatter when cutting.

Then check out many of the Aussies and UK cake artists since Royal Icing is very popular outside of the USA. icon_biggrin.gif
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Award winning cake designer and fine art sculptor.

"An artist discovers his genius the day he dares not to please." ~Andre Malraux
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post #8 of 26
To ice the cake in royal, you should make sure and put a layer of marzipan on the cake first. Then, you can add a little corn syrup to the royal icing before you ice with it. It is not toxic because royal icing is used on 99% of the cakes in the Caribbean, England, and Australia.

You will have to apply the royal icing on more than one day though. You would cover the cake in marzipan and spread a layer of royal as smooth as you can today. leave a day to dry and then add another layer of royal in another day or two and let that completely dry. A third layer may or may not be necessary depending on thick you applied the first two layers. Also, you may have to sand it a little smooth, they make a special rpyal icing sander that I've seen somewhere.

Good luck, I grew up eating cakes covered in royal and it was not hard at all. The marzipan halps keep it sof underneath, just crunchy on top!
post #9 of 26
My mistake - I should have worded differently.

Personally, I wouldn't want to frost and serve a cake with Royal Icing because how hard it is when it dries. I personally don't use it on my cookies.

I guess I'm cautious because I have broken a front tooth eating something hard. To me it's just easier for me to use the Buttercream.

When I decorate a cake with Royal Icing flowers I always tell the people eating it, that the flowers won't hurt you but I don't think you would want to eat them. That is all I need someone chipping a tooth eating a cake I made.

I also find it harder to smooth.
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post #10 of 26
RI is a beautifull covering for a cake, providing the base is correct. Im quoting a RI expert that gave me some advise on another message board. This person has actually written books on RI so she def knows what shes talking about.

Glycerin is added to royal icing (when coating as it attracts moisture) so that you will be able to cut through the icing on the cake ie not need a hammer and chisel.

To coat a cake with royal icing you need a firm surface - a sponge cake does not have this - too much spring plus the fact a sponge cake has too short a shelf life (seven days). Correctly speaking a cake has three coats of royal icing - one per day (so that's half your shelf life gone).

In the UK a cake would always be covered with marzipan before coating in royal icing. If someone opts not to use the marzipan, then they are in the same position as person covering a cake with butter-cream - the cake crumb can work its way to the surface (which looks awful)..plus the fact with a fruitcake you would get discolouration in the icing because of the moisture in the fruitcake

The glyserine ratio is 1 teaspoon for every lb icing.

Hope this helps someone
post #11 of 26
Thread Starter 
Thanks a lot everyone for the ideas and suggestions. Where can i find marzipan? Is it similar to teh almond paste we get in the regualr grocery stores?

Thansk
Lisha
post #12 of 26
An expert can correct me if I'm wrong but the essential difference between marzipan and almond paste is just the almond content. Store bought stuff should work just fine. When I learned to decorate using royal icing though we rolled it out like fonadnt and put it on the cake. I have never tried the method where you smooth it on like you would with buttercream.
post #13 of 26
The royal icing they are using to decorate cakes is different from the royal icing we use for making flowers. They have added lemon juice and glycerin. The lemon juice takes away some of the sweetness and the glycerin is used to soften the royal icing (just as it does in fondant).

Someone borrowed my copy of the book (without my permission) but you can find the receipe in "Fabulous Cake Decorating".
post #14 of 26
you use the almond paste in the recipe for marzipan. i sent you a pm with the recipe.
post #15 of 26
Thread Starter 
Thanks everyone. i'm making the cake tonight..
Will let youknow how th icing came out.
I saw couple recipes for RI which you roll out like fondant and put it on the cake..
I have an eye on that also as i have worked with fondant.. I took the wilton course 1 and 3..Didnt get a chance to take 2 yet..


Lisha
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