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How many?. . .

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
For all the experts out there. . .
How many boxes of cake mix would it take to make a half-sheet cake? The pan measures 12x18 and is 2" deep. (I think it's a half-sheet) Is it super difficult to slice it in half -- with the saw-like thing from Wilton -- to make it into a 2-layer cake?
Thank you in advance for all the advice.
-Lynelle
post #2 of 16
I am no expert, but I have a round 14x3 and it holds 3 cake mixes..When I first used it I thought shoot it will hold 4 with no problem, well that and my oven. Took me forever to get the smoke out! And the mess was ---> icon_surprised.gif As far as cutting it. I freeze mine first then I add little dots on the sides to make a center cut. I use a bread knife. I just insert the knife as far as it will go and start cutting one side then I turn it around and do the same to the other side. Works every time!
A woman is like a bag of Tea.
You don't know how strong she is until you put her in hot water.
Sweet Days and Happy Baking!
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A woman is like a bag of Tea.
You don't know how strong she is until you put her in hot water.
Sweet Days and Happy Baking!
Reply
post #3 of 16
I'd say 3-4 mixes. I use almost 2 full mixes in my 9*13 pan.

I torte all my cakes using a bread knife, even though I own the leveler you described. just faster and easier in my mind.
post #4 of 16
I have this pan and I use 3 mixes
post #5 of 16
I find the larger cakes a little hard to torte with either a cake leveler or a bread (or cake) knife. I mark the height that I want the layer to be with a knife in intervals all around the cake and then use dental floss (unflavored!) to "cut" the cake. Holding a long piece of floss stretched out between each hand, I start at one corner and pull the dental floss around and though to the opposite corner, checking to make sure I'm on track with my marks as I go. Kind of like flossing, kind of like cutting with a string type cutter. Sounds weird, but it works great!

Sandi
post #6 of 16
I don't torte my sheet cakes. If I need two layers of cake that is the same height as one (ie. 2 inches not 4 inches), I just bake two thinner layers. BUT I don't do this on a regular basis. I don't do torted sheet cakes for customers unless it ends up being a 4" high cake, and I CHARGE for that big time.
post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all of the replies! I love this forum.
My next question is how do you separate the layers once they are torted? With the smaller cakes (square and round) I can kinda "flip" the top layer off and into my hand. How is this done with a cake so large?
post #8 of 16
Lift up one end and slide a cake board under it.
post #9 of 16
For my cakes that are large I use an extra cake board (larger than the cake I am torting) I wrap it with contact paper (clear) and the cakes just slide on and off.

As for torting...for my large cakes I use sewing thread.
Mrsfish94- making cakes since 9/04 and loving it!!!
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Mrsfish94- making cakes since 9/04 and loving it!!!
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post #10 of 16
torte? Is that the same as leveling?
post #11 of 16
Torting just means cutting a cake into layers. If you want your cake to have four layers, cut each cake in half and fill one layer, then stack another on top, followed by more filling and stacking.

Sandi
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Quote:

When I first used it I thought shoot it will hold 4 with no problem, well that and my oven. Took me forever to get the smoke out! And the mess was icon_surprised.gif



Briansbaker, that made me laugh out loud! icon_smile.gif

'Helpful thread here.
post #13 of 16
Lynelle~

Take my advice... I learned this from a disaster. I posted it on the cake disaster forum.. icon_eek.gif

I used to turn my smaller cakes over in my hand but NOT anymore!!! I wasn't thinking & turned my first large cake over in my hand (out of habit I guess) & it fell in pieces onto the counter top!!! icon_cry.gificon_cry.gificon_cry.gif Needless to say I couldn't put it back together again..... I had to bake another cake!!!!! icon_sad.gif So now just to be safe I never turn a cake over into my hand. It's hard to break old habits!! tapedshut.gif

About your question about the sheet cake.. Isn't 12x18 a full sheet cake???? I have made several choc sheet cakes. I always measure the batter I put into my cakes. I use 20 cups of batter so that would be 3 cake mixes. Amount of icing needed would be 8 cups so I'd make 4 batches of BCI, that way you'd have plenty of icing~ If you have any left over you can always put in in the frig!

Good luck~ thumbs_up.gif
"Learn from a turtle... it only makes progress when it sticks it's neck out"
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"Learn from a turtle... it only makes progress when it sticks it's neck out"
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post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by linnburg

Torting just means cutting a cake into layers. If you want your cake to have four layers, cut each cake in half and fill one layer, then stack another on top, followed by more filling and stacking.

Sandi



Thanks, Sandi. The coolest thing about this site is I learn something new pretty much everytime I log in. This site is a newbie's dream!! icon_biggrin.gif

Joe
post #15 of 16
Thread Starter 
All of these tips and tricks are great! I could picture myself flipping the large cake onto my hand and having it flip into pieces all over the place. I just pictured the cake "catching" on a cake board if I tried sliding it through the two pieces. . .but if that is what you all say works -- I will try it. I appreciate all of the information provided by you experts. You make it all sound so easy.
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