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That was easy! I'll tell ya what I know! - Page 4

post #46 of 72
I've only recently started making/using chocolate clay. It's amazing stuff. I first paid attention to the recipe when I found it in the back of "The Wedding Cake Book" by Dede Wilson. A portion of the description she gives for "Chocolate Plastic" says:

"Chocolate pastic, or modeling chocolate, is a combination of melted chocolate and light corn syrup. But the sum is greater than its parts because these two ingredients make a wonderful, malleable chocolate clay that can be rolled out and molded into a variety of shapes ...

You may make the plastic out of semisweet, milk, or white chocolate. Or, you can make all three and marbelize them together, or roll them out side by side to make broad stripes. ... When you combine thte corn syurup with the chocolate, the chocolate may look grainy and about to seize. Keep stirring, but don't worry if it doesn't look completely smooth. When you pour it out, the chocolate will resemble a large, thick puddle.

The white chocolate plastic can be tinted with paste colors and/or brushed with powdered colors ... The powders are applied after whatever you are molding is done. Powders can also be used on top of paste dyed plastic for a custom look ..."


Her recipe is:
28 oz chocolate
1 c. light corn syrup

I found this to be little too loose, in fact very loose. When I kneaded it later, I had a lot of oiliness. So I went to my local supplier and we discussed it. She suggested 14 oz. chocolate to 1/3 cup of corn syrup, so I melted more chocolate and added it to what I had. It became wonderful.

If you look in my gallery, there are 4 photos of chocolate clay work. The "Two on the Way" and "Twin Baby Girls on the Way" have chocolate clay-covered dresser, white chocolate clay rug with hand-painted roses of gel food color, the ruffles on the bassinette are of white chocolate clay, and the baby heads, blocks, lamp and other items on top of the dresser are of chocolate clay. The "Calla Lily Cookies" show just that and the 2 "Masters in Education" photos show a white chocolate clay diploma (white chocolate clay with cocoa powder blushed on to make a parchment-look), rose and tassel. The gold edging on the rose and the gold trim on the tassel were accomplished with gold luster dust with a little bit of lemon extract, mixed into a paste and brushed on the chocolate where I wanted the effect.

I love this stuff. You don't have to worry about taste, 'cuz it's pretty good. It doesn't need to "dry" because once it gets cool it becomes more solid. If it's too firm, just put it in the microwave for a few seconds until you can start to knead it and proceed. I think you can use it to cover a cake, but I don't know if it would drape the way fondant does. I think experimentation is in the works ... call it research and development, but call the neighborhood kids over and have a chocolate clay party! Yay!


Odessa[/i]
The Client doesn't generally understand the creative process we go through to make them a gorgeous confection ... it really IS more than "just" butter, eggs, and flour!
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The Client doesn't generally understand the creative process we go through to make them a gorgeous confection ... it really IS more than "just" butter, eggs, and flour!
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post #47 of 72
Okay, I posted my last comment, went to the home page and take a look at what was there ...

http://www.cakecentral.com/cake-photo-141373.html

If this doesn't prove how easy it is to work with chocolate clay, I don't know what does. Not even my cake, but what a great piece of work.

Enjoy!

Odessa
The Client doesn't generally understand the creative process we go through to make them a gorgeous confection ... it really IS more than "just" butter, eggs, and flour!
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The Client doesn't generally understand the creative process we go through to make them a gorgeous confection ... it really IS more than "just" butter, eggs, and flour!
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post #48 of 72
I can't wait to try this!
No matter how bad I think it looks, it always seems to taste good!!
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No matter how bad I think it looks, it always seems to taste good!!
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post #49 of 72
wow, that cake is beautiful....I wonder if it was hard for her to cover the cakes w/ the chocolate clay...
post #50 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakemommy

I would hope this recipe "reacts" differently than Wilton's Candy Clay recipe. I would never use that recipe to cover a cake with. I would have ever considered attempting to roll that recipe out to cover a cake with. It's not THAT soft even if you work with it. It's just too much to try and soften even in batches and roll out.

Now if this particular Chocolate Clay recipe is easier/softer/less messy than Wilton's Candy Clay recipe then I will consider using it.

The Wilton white Melts seized when I added color to it. Even the tiniest amount of color ruined it.

I'll have to give it a try. Has anyone made and used Chocolate Plastique?


Amy



I agree. Its ok for smaller items but not to cover a cake. Let me know what you think of the new recipe!
June 1996 ~ Thats when my life changed forever, I accepted Christ.
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June 1996 ~ Thats when my life changed forever, I accepted Christ.
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post #51 of 72
Do you think you could put this on cookies to decorate them like you would RBC or MMF?
Kim
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Kim
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post #52 of 72
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilkimberb

Do you think you could put this on cookies to decorate them like you would RBC or MMF?



I don't know why not. I have plenty left over.....I need to find something to do with it! I'll make some cookies tomorrow and see what happens! I'll pm you too.
post #53 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by katy625

Quote:
Originally Posted by lilkimberb

Do you think you could put this on cookies to decorate them like you would RBC or MMF?



I don't know why not. I have plenty left over.....I need to find something to do with it! I'll make some cookies tomorrow and see what happens! I'll pm you too.



I would love to know if you could use it on cookies as well... thx
post #54 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Strazle

I made the chocolate clay and colored it red before adding the syrup. After a couple days, the formed parts were blotchy with white everywhere. I had to throw it out and use fondant instead. Anyone else had this issue?



That sounds a lot like what happens when chocolate is overheated. A day or two after it is set, a bloom forms, which is blotchy gray or whitish.

Bloom can also form when chocolate is kept at too high or too low a temperature.

RedPanda
One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.
- AA Milne -
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One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.
- AA Milne -
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post #55 of 72
It does work on cookies.
post #56 of 72
lots of info to refer back to here....wow...thanks
post #57 of 72
CHoclate modeling clay, chocolate plastic or whatever you choose to call it, is for modeling roses, figures, etc. I don't suggest it for covering cakes. It does harden, making it near impossible to roll. Not to mention to roll it thin enough to cover it like you would fondant, would be very difficult as well. You also can't handle it the same was fondant, cause it will melt. You also couldn't soften it up in the microwave like fondant to make it easier to roll, cause it would melt. Not to mention, it hardens as it sits, which may not be very pleasing to the palate. What you can do, is make a chocolate fondant, which I think some people mistake for modeling chocolate. They aren't the same thing.
post #58 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakemommy

The recipe sounds awfully familiar to the Candy Clay recipe on the back of Wilton's Candy Melts. Am I to understand you do not use the melts? I've tried coloring the white melts with my Americolor before but it just siezed up

Did you use store bought (Nestle's or another brand) white chocolate chips and milk or semi-sweet? I would imagine it takes quite a few batches to cover a cake with this stuff.

Where did you get the recipe from?


Amy



I would think you would need to use candy color for that not to happen.
post #59 of 72
Actually, I have seen quite a few decorators on tv use modeling chocolate, which they specifically described as a combination of chocolate and corn syrup to cover cakes. There are different consistencies based on your ratio of chocolate to corn syrup - I have used some that was stiffer, which was wonderful for modeling. I have also used some that was too soft for that, but would be perfect for cake covering.
post #60 of 72
I've seen them cover rice crispies, but not actual cake. Like when Buddy did that planet cake, he covered the planets in it. But he didn't cover the actual cake part in it. It's pretty heavy stuff. You ould have to roll it thinner then fondant to be palate pleaseing. If someone has a great recipe that works though, please share. I would to see what one looks like.
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