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What sort of cake fillings do you suggest? - Page 2

post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bramsley View Post
 

Wow! I'm trying to understand what I'm being told here. :shock:

 

Are you saying that perishable food should not be eaten after 4 hours at room temperature? Is that right? How do you make and decorate a cake in 4 hours, let alone allow clients enough time to have them on show, say for a reception, before eating?  And what about commercial cakes on sale in supermarkets that aren't refrigerated but have days on their use-by dates?  

 

I clearly have a lot to learn, and will do some research into this, but have I understood you correctly?

Thank you

 

Hi Bramsley!  It is great that you are willing to learn more about this topic, to keep your family/clients safe!

 

Since you are in the UK, here is a link that might be of help to you: http://multimedia.food.gov.uk/multimedia/pdfs/publication/hygieneguidebooklet.pdf

 

It seems to contain similar information to our US ServSafe classes, which are required of at least one staff member or owner of every restaurant here (at least in my state).  The potentially hazardous nature of food depends on many things, including pH, water activity, acidity and nutrient content, along with how it was processed (cooked/fresh/etc.)  So in your original example, I would have felt safe using the commercial preserves in a cake that would be held at room temperature, but I still would only consider a couple of days the maximum total time from beginning to end, if I weren't able to fridge or freeze it.  Your problem was when you added fresh raspberries to the mix - they are a perishable item.  Fresh fruit is perishable.  The berries in the commercial preserves not only were processed (cooked, which helps kill some organisms) they also are being helped along by the sugar and acid in the preserves.

 

The cakes in grocery stores probably contain sleeve fillings, which can be shelf stable.  They are commercially manufactured just for that purpose.

 

As much as customers want to have it all (highly detailed/decorated cakes with all the best, fresh fillings) sometimes you just can't accommodate what they desire, unless you can do your decorating inside of a walk in cooler. :)

 

Please ask if you have any more questions!

 

Liz

Follow me on my Twitter handle: @Sugar_Iowa

Or on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SugarFineBakedGoodsAndConfections

Reply

Follow me on my Twitter handle: @Sugar_Iowa

Or on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SugarFineBakedGoodsAndConfections

Reply
post #17 of 19

Also, here is a quote regarding bacteria growth over time, with foods in the danger zone noted above:

 

Under ideal conditions some bacteria may grow and divide every 20 minutes. Consequently, one bacterial cell may increase to 16 million cells in 8 hours.

 

This is how food poisoning happens - you don't see it, and you probably won't taste it, but that bacteria can grow fast!

 

Liz

Follow me on my Twitter handle: @Sugar_Iowa

Or on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SugarFineBakedGoodsAndConfections

Reply

Follow me on my Twitter handle: @Sugar_Iowa

Or on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SugarFineBakedGoodsAndConfections

Reply
post #18 of 19

As you are in the UK I would suggest this:

http://www.saferfoodhandler.co.uk/

 

Even if you are just doing it as a hobby. It's really reasonable and very informative. 

 

EHOs will tell you to stay away from perishable fillings, such as fruit. Even if there is no mould on it, the bacteria can still be there. Mould is when it has got to the excessive level and can be seen, but to get to that level there is still millions of bacteria. 

The Danger Zone (insert Top Gun tune here) is 5 to 63C.

If you are doing perishable fillings such as fresh cream then you are high risk. My council approval is based on the understanding that I only do shelf stable fillings, which is fine by me!

Anyway, I recommend the course ;-D

post #19 of 19
Thread Starter 

Thank you everyone

 

I panicked when I read some of the earlier posts, hence my confusion. I knew I must have mis-understood something - I failed to realise that it was perishable food that was being discussed. I feel calmer now, but not exactly happier. 

 

Thank you Liz at Sugar and anaelisabethlee - those look like really helpful links which I plan to read more closely and will look into the course. 

 

However, I'm not sure I will continue to make cakes for others in future. I don't want to put anyone's health at risk, but I do this as a hobby for my own enjoyment as much as anything, I enjoy the artistic side of creating of something unique that doesn't look like cake and don't want to compromise that either by trying to rush it. 

 

Thankfully none of my friends or family has ever suffered any ill effects from a cake of mine so far. 

 

This thread has given me a lot to think about. 

Thank you.

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