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Weather delay... storing a fondant covered cake for 2 weeks??

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

Hello everyone! I've browsed these forums a lot and just about everything I've ever been curious about has always had an answer! Everyone is so knowledgeable around here!

 

Well, my best friend has a dilemma. There was a baby shower planned today and a fondant covered two tiered cake was already made and delivered yesterday, before the snow and bad weather came today. The shower has been postponed for two weeks. Is there any way to store this cake until then? These things are expensive, and any way to salvage this would be wonderful.

 

Thank you so much for any advice!

 

Kim

post #2 of 15
The only thing to do really would be to put the cake in the box and wrap the box with a couple of layers of plastic wrap. Freeze it. Remove from freezer 1 day before the party to let it defrost at room temperature. Keep the plastic on the box while it defrosts.
post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 

Thanks you... I don't know how stored cake will taste in two weeks. I talked to the shower host and if we can figure out a way to at least salvage how the cake LOOKS... I can bake cupcakes to be served to eat instead of eating stale and old cake. That way she won't have to spend hundreds on a new cake. 

post #4 of 15
If it tastes good now, it should taste good in 2 weeks after freezing. Just make sure you box it and wrap the box well. Freeze it upright obviously...
You could always contact the baker and see what they suggest too. I am assuming you didn't make the cake?
post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 

I will let her know to do that... from what I've gathered, as long as nobody touches the fondant while it's being stored and as it's warming to room temp, the cake should be okay.

 

No didn't make this cake. Just trying to help the frantic host salvage the expensive things for the shower, custom cake and custom iced sugar cookies... which I found a wonderful blog on how to store them (http://bakeat350.blogspot.com/2012/05/yes-you-can-freeze-decorated.html for anyone who encounters the same problem)

post #6 of 15

Place the decorated cake in box. Wrap the box in several layers of saran wrap and a layer of aluminum foil.Place box in freezer.

 

24 hrs. before serving, place still wrapped box in refrigerator to defrost.

 

Several hours before serving, place still wrapped box on counter to come to room temp.

 

Remove cake from box and serve.

 

Cake will be fine and look & taste as if just made.

 

I've done it many times [when I was unavailable for a client when the cake was needed].  I've stored them and have had clients store them.  Never had a single issue with decoration, texture, or taste.  Directions must be followed exactly as written.

post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by maybenot View Post
 

Place the decorated cake in box. Wrap the box in several layers of saran wrap and a layer of aluminum foil.Place box in freezer.

 

24 hrs. before serving, place still wrapped box in refrigerator to defrost.

 

Several hours before serving, place still wrapped box on counter to come to room temp.

 

Remove cake from box and serve.

 

Cake will be fine and look & taste as if just made.

 

I've done it many times [when I was unavailable for a client when the cake was needed].  I've stored them and have had clients store them.  Never had a single issue with decoration, texture, or taste.  Directions must be followed exactly as written.

 

 

AWESOME advice. Thanks for sharing your practiced technique. I always wonder if this method actually works, because in theory it sounds like it would. 

 

I've never had to freeze a cake, but now that I know I can, I might try this. My family live about 200 miles away and I rarely visit them, so unfortunately they end up with a lot of grocery store bought birthday cakes. If I knew they could freeze them, I could bring them up with me when I visit.

 

How long do you think a cake could be frozen for with this method? I mean without tasting like it was frozen.

post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by maybenot View Post
 

Place the decorated cake in box. Wrap the box in several layers of saran wrap and a layer of aluminum foil.Place box in freezer.

 

24 hrs. before serving, place still wrapped box in refrigerator to defrost.

 

Several hours before serving, place still wrapped box on counter to come to room temp.

 

Remove cake from box and serve.

 

Cake will be fine and look & taste as if just made.

 

I've done it many times [when I was unavailable for a client when the cake was needed].  I've stored them and have had clients store them.  Never had a single issue with decoration, texture, or taste.  Directions must be followed exactly as written.


I like this idea of letting it defrost in the fridge. Less of a "shock" to the cake and it will probably keep its appearance better too.

 

We froze my wedding top tier cake in a deep chest freezer and then pulled it out for our 1 year anniversary and it still tasted wonderful!

post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeanneW View Post
 

How long do you think a cake could be frozen for with this method? I mean without tasting like it was frozen.

In all honesty, if the box is wrapped properly, a cake would be fine in a modern freezer for at least a year.

 

For a client, I tell them 30 days or less.  As I recall, the longest a client needed to store a cake [because I was going to be away well before the event] was 2 weeks.

 

For my family, they're usually gone in 6 months.

 

I really would rather not do it at all--I know there's a "stigma" attached to frozen cakes--but when time constraints or client pleadings force the issue, I'm glad to know it works, too.

 

I've traveled with a cake that was frozen from OH to NH--10 hrs. by car.  When I got there, it was defrosted, in perfect condition, and ready to serve.

 

Glad to be of help

post #10 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thank you SO much! I passed the info to the shower hostess. I think the expensive cake and cookies will be salvaged!!
post #11 of 15

Since most of us on Cake Central are bakers and decorators, we know that some people can find our artisan and artful creations expensive and they can cost hundreds of dollars, so you really don't need to mention it in each of your posts!

post #12 of 15
Thread Starter 
I'm just relieved, thank you.
post #13 of 15

So apparently fondant will not dry out by freezing it on a cake because I'd like to freeze my basic fondanted cake until the morning of (2 days later) when I'll place the finishing decorations. Plus, transporting it frozen helps soooooo much! But what if I can't find a box large enough for the board my cake is on but small enough to fit my freezer? How well does the "box" need to fit to achieve the protection your saying it does for the cake?

post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geri Day View Post
 

So apparently fondant will not dry out by freezing it on a cake because I'd like to freeze my basic fondanted cake until the morning of (2 days later) when I'll place the finishing decorations. Plus, transporting it frozen helps soooooo much! But what if I can't find a box large enough for the board my cake is on but small enough to fit my freezer? How well does the "box" need to fit to achieve the protection your saying it does for the cake?

The issue is really more about not getting condensation droplets on the fondant when it's coming to room temp.  That's the reason for the box because as the cake defrosts, the condensation goes to the box and not onto the cake.  The wrapping of the box is what helps to keep the cake/fondant from getting freezer burn/drying out and also from keeping odors away from the cake as it defrosts in the fridge.

 

The box needs to be big enough to fit the cake, top to bottom and side to side, and there needs to be enough space the both the freezer and the fridge for the wrapped box to be stored.

post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geri Day View Post
 

But what if I can't find a box large enough for the board my cake is on but small enough to fit my freezer? How well does the "box" need to fit to achieve the protection your saying it does for the cake?

 

Sorry a little late with my reply, but could you freeze each tier separately in its own small box, then stack and place in a bigger box in the fridge when defrosting? You would want to dowel the tiers before you froze them, then you can simply stack and defrost.

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