Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › How Do I? › Cake photography
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Cake photography

post #1 of 30
Thread Starter 

Since I put a lot of time into decorating my cakes, I would like to take the best possible photographs of them.  Are there any tips or tricks to highlight the cake?  When you scroll through cake decorator's photos of their cakes, the pictures look crisp, clean, clutter-free & simply beautiful.  I would love to achieve similar results!  Thank you.

post #2 of 30

i am a dud at photography--i know that a few times i've caught a picture of my cake in the fridge and that little light up above really enhanced the whole deal--so i learned that by accident--and to hold my breath when i squeeze the button--also i try to pin my elbows to my side--

 

sunlight--sunlight is best--even trot stuff outside is a great idea (not when it's 20 below--not that that needs to be mentioned agh)

 

and that is about all i've allowed myself to learn about it--there are great photographers on here though so hopefully someone smart will pipe up for you

if you had your own tv show what would be your favorite commercial/sponsor

i think i'd like ghirardelli and hershey for starters...

Reply

if you had your own tv show what would be your favorite commercial/sponsor

i think i'd like ghirardelli and hershey for starters...

Reply
post #3 of 30

There must be tutorials, and even one of those Craft classes for photography.  I've seen books on 'food' photography in book stores. 

 

It is always disappointing to make a cake, carefully pick the colors you want, then click a pik and it looks awful.  You will notice that the nicest cakes usually have the most professional photography.≈

~~We are living in a world today where lemonade is made from artificial flavors and furniture polish is made from real lemons. ~Alfred E. Newman
Reply
~~We are living in a world today where lemonade is made from artificial flavors and furniture polish is made from real lemons. ~Alfred E. Newman
Reply
post #4 of 30

If you're photographing your cakes at home, look into making a lightbox, there are lots of articles online about how to do that. If you're photographing them at the reception site for weddings you're more limited because the light in those palces is usually terrible, so you just need to learn how to use your camera. The custom white balance is the best tool I've found to really get the best color, then changing the lighting using photoshop later helps if necessary. http://acaketorememberva.blogspot.com/2013/03/taking-better-photos.html

post #5 of 30
Agreed with costumeczar my hubby is a photog and he keeps buggin me about gettin a light box (or making one) but my ration is I don't do enough cakes to keep a light box stored, but I'm starting to see his point I want better pics of my cakes:)
make a little birdhouse in your soul TMBG
Reply
make a little birdhouse in your soul TMBG
Reply
post #6 of 30

A little contrast and saturation can go a long way in making a cake look great in a picture. I've been doing that for a while but still always liked the photographers pictures better than my own. A couple weeks ago I took about 500 pics of 2 different dummy cakes going in every room and random place I could think of until I found the best light/background. You could be surprised. Experiment and find what works best for you. Try different angles/backgrounds/props etc.  I used this post long ago to start editing my photos http://www.lilaloa.com/2012/01/photo-editing-for-cookie-makers-not.html  

 

Here are some of my favorite pics from my 500 photo session. 

 

 

 

post #7 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar View Post
 

If you're photographing your cakes at home, look into making a lightbox, there are lots of articles online about how to do that. If you're photographing them at the reception site for weddings you're more limited because the light in those palces is usually terrible, so you just need to learn how to use your camera. The custom white balance is the best tool I've found to really get the best color, then changing the lighting using photoshop later helps if necessary.

 

http://acaketorememberva.blogspot.com/2013/03/taking-better-photos.html

 

Is this a point and shoot Canon camera, or a more complicated one.  Your white balance in your blog is pretty cool.  That was interesting, about our brains making things right for us.

~~We are living in a world today where lemonade is made from artificial flavors and furniture polish is made from real lemons. ~Alfred E. Newman
Reply
~~We are living in a world today where lemonade is made from artificial flavors and furniture polish is made from real lemons. ~Alfred E. Newman
Reply
post #8 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by bakingkat View Post
 

A little contrast and saturation can go a long way in making a cake look great in a picture. I've been doing that for a while but still always liked the photographers pictures better than my own. A couple weeks ago I took about 500 pics of 2 different dummy cakes going in every room and random place I could think of until I found the best light/background. You could be surprised. Experiment and find what works best for you. Try different angles/backgrounds/props etc.  I used this post long ago to start editing my photos http://www.lilaloa.com/2012/01/photo-editing-for-cookie-makers-not.html

 

your cakes are incredible, it reminds me of why I like to visit Seattle as often as possible.

~~We are living in a world today where lemonade is made from artificial flavors and furniture polish is made from real lemons. ~Alfred E. Newman
Reply
~~We are living in a world today where lemonade is made from artificial flavors and furniture polish is made from real lemons. ~Alfred E. Newman
Reply
post #9 of 30

I believe in only using natural sun light, only.

 

 

If I can take something outside I can get the most perfect photographs. The sun gives the most brilliant full color spectrum that artificial lights just can't match. 

 

But where I live it's cloudy probably 50% of the time so I have to shoot indoors. For that I've found my sliding glass door in my kitchen gives me the most even lighting of all the windows in my home. I put a sheet of white foam core on my kitchen table and prop one up right in a chair to create a cheap "light box". The white helps reflex the sun onto my cake and eliminates background images.

 

Once upon a time I liked showing a natural setting like the examples in bakingkat's post. But in time I always regret having a background behind my cakes....because it dates the image...like a funky bridesmaid dress. (Although professional photographers can make backgrounds work so brilliantly, I just can't.)

 

Here's what my foam core setup looks like when I shoot:

 

 

It's not perfect like costumeczar mentions in her blog, the white is more of a blue. Than I use my Photoshop software to crop my photos and I can auto correct the white tone to correct my bluish white.

 

 

Still never as good as a outside natural shot............

post #10 of 30

I agree natural light is best, and it is even better coming from windows on the north side of your shop/home/office, if you must be indoors.  That is for continental U.S. - I'm sure that rule varies depending of where you are in the world, but it is the most even light, for both photography, and painting portraits.

 

Liz

Follow me on my Twitter handle: @Sugar_Iowa

Or on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SugarFineBakedGoodsAndConfections

Reply

Follow me on my Twitter handle: @Sugar_Iowa

Or on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SugarFineBakedGoodsAndConfections

Reply
post #11 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by MBalaska View Post

Is this a point and shoot Canon camera, or a more complicated one.  Your white balance in your blog is pretty cool.  That was interesting, about our brains making things right for us.

I have a canon EOS rebel, so it's an SLR but it's not an expensive one. Some of the newer point and shoots actually do have settings that you can adjust, so I guess it would depend on your camera.
post #12 of 30
I have 3 roller blinds on my wall: black, white and empty to which I add patterned wall paper. these 'store' my backdrops really nicely.

If you can't get good natural light go for:

A flash or strong lamp pointing away from the cake with something white to bounce off- think of it like hitting a snooker ball off the cushion- the light has to bounce off and come back toward the cake at an angle, hitting the cake straight on with the flash is too harsh.

if you don't have a flash/lamp use a high wattage bulb not an energy saver and not LED light - try not to shadow your cake when you stand in front of it

lighting from above with a cooker hood light looks good, use nice white or black foam core as an easy backdrop

If using an SLR use the lowest ISO you can to reduce noise, use tripod or a beanbag on the back of a chair to keep your hand steady (turn the chair sideways and kneel on it), if you still get shaky hand blur set a timer so you can press the shutter button and then keep still icon_smile.gif
post #13 of 30
Thread Starter 

Thank you!

post #14 of 30

Inspired by a collection of a beautiful tea set.

 

Hi everybody, I too have a Cannon EOS rebel, mine is an older version. I used to feel all the time as if my camera was in control and it was :) - I have been taking some time to learn a bit about photography as I feel that is one of those things that we need in the cake industry in order to brand our image better. I certainly do not have the funds to hire a photographer every time I have a cake ready to go, so I been learning on my own. I am actually starting a blog within the following weeks in which I will talk and provide more info on the subject. 

 

There are 3 elements to keep in mind:

 

1. Aperture: Referring to the size of the opening of the lens. Also known as the f/stop

2. Shutter Speed: The amount of time that the camera sensor is exposed to light when a photograph is being taken. This is measured in seconds or fractions of seconds.

3. ISO: It measures how sensitive the sensor is to the light.

 

I love photography that is bright, clean and as such taking pics during the day is better than later in the day. Keep in mind that the higher your f/stop number, the smaller your aperture and the less light that comes in. The lower the f/stop number, the larger the aperture, which leads to more light. 

 

Elizabeth Houde 

post #15 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweettales

 



There are 3 elements to keep in mind:



 



1. Aperture: Referring to the size of the opening of the lens. Also known as the f/stop



2. Shutter Speed: The amount of time that the camera sensor is exposed to light when a photograph is being taken. This is measured in seconds or fractions of seconds.



3. ISO: It measures how sensitive the sensor is to the light.



 



Elizabeth Houde 


 



The order in which to consider these three is generally:

1 - how blurry do I want the background? The wider the aperture (the lower the f-stop number) the blurrier the background will be, standing back and zooming in makes this effect even stronger, this work even with point and press cameras. A low number like F3.5 will have only a thin part of your cake in focus, the rest in front and behind that point will be out of focus; this is a lovely effect for close-ups. F20 or more will likely keep your whole cake in focus but you will need more light (or a slower shutter speed).

2 - so, you have chosen what you want you picture to look like, now you have to balance ISO and shutter speed so your picture isn’t too dark or too light. You want the lowest ISO possible e.g. 50 or 100, as this reduces the grainy noise making lovely sharp pictures, but the smaller the ISO number the longer the shutter speed you will need so if you can't keep the camera still with a tripod and self timer setting (so you don't nudge the camera letting go of the shutter button!) then you have to increase either the ISO or the light in the room (more lamps or a camera flash or wait for a sunny day). Usually a shutter speed of 200 or more is fast enough to cancel out shaky hands especially if you can lean on something. Try not to go above ISO 800 unless your camera is an amazing SLR or you will get lots of noise.

Take lots of pictures going through the settings and delete the pants ones icon_smile.gif

ps lovely cake, setup and photo Elizabeth!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: How Do I?
Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › How Do I? › Cake photography