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Tiered cake - Page 2

post #16 of 44
Thread Starter 

thank you

post #17 of 44
Thread Starter 

Well ladies, my second attempt at e tiered cake was crazy. lol The cake part itself was awesome but the fondant was horrible!!! lol I'll keep trying though thank you all

post #18 of 44

Oh no Tastee!!! I'm sorry to hear that :( I wish I had something helpful to offer but I myself have not been brave enough to cover a cake in fondant...yet. Maybe get an Agbay- I've convinced myself that it's the answer to everything (lol- jk of course). Hope your next one goes better! Keep at it :D

post #19 of 44
Tastee,

Maybe you should practice with cake dummies a lot until you're confident enough to cover a proper cake?

I know it's not the same, but it helps achieving that skill.

Beside, each dummy you cover well can be a base for a different decoration and that way you can put them in your portfolio.
"Everyday is someone's birthday"
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"Everyday is someone's birthday"
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post #20 of 44

Hi Tasteetreats,

 

You likely live near a place that offers Wilton classes. You might find it helpful to have an instructor demonstrate and help you hands-on. Wilton classes are very reasonably priced and cover a lot of the basics of decorating, including leveling and applying fondant. Of course you will use all Wilton products and methods in the class, so after you learn the basics you can expand into other types of tools and methods. But I highly recommend Wilton classes as a place to start, most decorators I know got their start with Wilton classes and tools. 

 

http://www.wilton.com/classes/classlocator.cfm

 

http://www.wilton.com/classes/

 

Good luck!

post #21 of 44
Thread Starter 

Yes, I start class #2 on Thursday, also I've requested the help of a friend of mine so hopefully I'll start to improve :) Thank you

post #22 of 44
Thread Starter 

lol, I think that I need a bigger rolling pin because the one I use is really little and I'm unable to lift it correctly to put it over the cake. So I'll be making another one this weekend. Wish me luck.....AGAIN!!! LOL

post #23 of 44
Thread Starter 

I know I keep hearing that I should do dummy cakes but baking real cakes give me a chance to try new recipes. Even when the fondant looks horrible I give the cakes away. lol

post #24 of 44
Thread Starter 

Here's the pic of cake#2 lol I promise my cakes are so much better lol

post #25 of 44
Tastee,

If you don't have/can't afford a big rolling pin yet, go to the craft store or the hardware store, and get a piece of some big PVC pipe. Ask them to cut it for you if possible, to a reasonable measure. Get home, disinfect and clean it really well. This substitute isn't as heavy (at all) as a proper rolling pin but it can serve the length purpose really well, and it's smooth too.

Good luck.
"Everyday is someone's birthday"
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"Everyday is someone's birthday"
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post #26 of 44
Thread Starter 

I'm going right after work to go purchase one, but thanks for the PVC advice. I'll definitely keep that in mind. I have a mini rolling pin and I THINK I end up rolling it out to thin with the smaller one because I'm trying to get the length and width I need.

post #27 of 44

I think a longer rolling pin will also help with the overall appearance/smoothness of the fondant too. When trying to roll out a large piece with a little pin, I would imagine that it's very easy to get divets and an uneven thickness in the fondant. A long pin will help to give you that smooth surface area. I'm planning on covering my first cakeboard in fondant for my next cake so was researching rolling pins the other day.The opinions seem very split. Many like the 20" Wilton fondant roller, especially because you can buy guide rings that help you achieve a more even thickness when rolling. They said it's also a great tool when it comes time to applying the fondant to the cake. Others said the Sil Pin is really awesome because of it's handles and weight. I happen to already have a stainless steel rolling pin that I'm going to try out first before buying another. We'll see if it does the trick.

 

Good luck Tastee. Keep us posted :)

post #28 of 44

Sadly, I had to buy a Wilton $7 leveler. Can't afford the Agbay this year. Do you ever see any sold used???

post #29 of 44

I did this the other day. Great suggestion!!! The dummy is even, so it is good for fondant practice. I got about 5 different looks with one roll of fondant for my portfolio. 

Nancy

post #30 of 44

Or go to a flea market/antique shop. The dustier the shop, the better. They always have some old really heavy rolling pins for less than $20. I love my old ones!! I would disinfect the heck out of it with bleach,  unless the other bakers know something about bleach not being good on old rolling pins. 

Nancy

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