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Coloring the Cake Batter

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Hello everyone,

 

Does anybody know how to color a cake batter without affecting the final results? First time I tried, my cake did not rise and harden. Do you recommend adding a big amount of color first to attempt to get the color you want faster and so you don't mix too much? I think mixing a lot was my mistake :/

 

Thank you cake lovers ;)

post #2 of 11
I color my batter all the time when I make red velvet.... dont use alot of color,add a couple drops at a time to achieve desired color and dont overmix.... ive never had a problem with the end result... cake always rises and is soft as well as moist. Hope this helps a little
post #3 of 11
Hi. I have coloured cake batters before with no problem and cake turned out very soft and spongy. Are you using liquid colours? I always use gel colours because a little goes a long way and does not change the batter consistency. And always start little and build up on colour it's easier to add then remove. I mix the batter slowly like folding so I do not over mix it. :Good luck! icon_biggrin.gif
post #4 of 11
I recently made a rainbow cake for a child's birthday. With every layer a different colour. To prevent the colour affecting the texture of the cake it needs to be added to the wet ingredients. And beaten in so that it is evenly distributed.

If you add it at the end you knock the air out of the mix and it fails to rise.

Use the colour pastes otherwise you will not get the colour concentration you are looking for.

If you are cooking for children then try to use colours that do not affect behaviour.

For red velvet I would go back to the original Recipe and use beetroot. It makes for a cake that is really moist.
post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by paperlace1 View Post

I recently made a rainbow cake for a child's birthday. With every layer a different colour. To prevent the colour affecting the texture of the cake it needs to be added to the wet ingredients. And beaten in so that it is evenly distributed.

If you add it at the end you knock the air out of the mix and it fails to rise.

Use the colour pastes otherwise you will not get the colour concentration you are looking for.

If you are cooking for children then try to use colours that do not affect behaviour.

For red velvet I would go back to the original Recipe and use beetroot. It makes for a cake that is really moist.

 

Quote:

 

I use soft gel paste colors (Americolor). since you say you add the color to wet ingredients, when you made the rainbow cake, did you make many different batters? and, to which of the wet ingredients do you add the color and how much you add? Thank you.

post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 

THank you all,  for your comments and suggestions. :)

post #7 of 11
I generally use a genoa sponge and beat the colour into the eggs. Yes I use the gel concentrates. The amount is more difficult because it depends on the amount of mix for a 4 egg mix I suggest about .5 ml . Be aware that the gels tend not to disperse in oil. I prefer not to take the colour too deep because it can put people off when it comes to eating. If you use orange or yellow it takes more get to achieve the colour because you have to overcome the natural colour of the sponge. some colours affect the flavour so counter balance with vanilla or other flavours.

Don't worry to much about batter types as long as you add the colour to the wet ingredients it will work fine
post #8 of 11

Have you tried Powdered Food Coloring.

~~We are living in a world today where lemonade is made from artificial flavors and furniture polish is made from real lemons. ~Alfred E. Newman
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~~We are living in a world today where lemonade is made from artificial flavors and furniture polish is made from real lemons. ~Alfred E. Newman
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post #9 of 11
No I haven't but I don't see why it would not work. It may be more difficult to decide how much to use. I would either sift it into the flour or mix it a small amount of liquid either milk or beaten egg. From a pricing view point gel colours would wor out cheaper.
post #10 of 11
I use powdered in baking, the price works out the same as my regular dyes.
I hate it if there's even a hint of the nasty gel flavour, which you really notice in a lot of red velvet cakes, and they've never messed with the way my cakes make up.
post #11 of 11
For my strawberry marble cake, most of the red in the contrast batter comes from the jam itself, supplemented with a few drops of good old McCormick food coloring. And I think I used a bit too much in the last one, because it shifted the color a bit too dark and too crimson. The jam affects the batter chemistry enough to where the contrast batter is slightly depressed compared to the white batter, but it doesn't screw it up completely (it still rises, and you don't even notice any difference in density).

James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

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James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

Reply
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