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Guide for lettering? - Page 2

post #16 of 24
Thread Starter 

Ok. Here is last year's Leland Award cake. Note how the lettering was rather uneven in size.

Cake for 2012 Leland Awards

 

And now, this year's cake, and the recipient, Michael Powe, with both the trophy and the cake:

Leland2013cakeLeland2013recipient

Note how the lettering, while I couldn't get it as dark, is at least neater (although I now notice that the "rd" in "Award" is just a bit shrunken), and how I did a better way of troweling the frosting smooth, and at least attempted to apply "The Family Pattern" to it.

 

It was well received, and I know I need (1) some food coloring of approximately a burnt sienna color, and (2) an offset frosting spatula of about the same size and shape as the 50-odd-year-old flat one I use, because the handle gets in the way of troweling it smooth.

 

And I think next year, I'll use roughly this same layout, but shift the trophy a bit to the right, and the Museum logo a bit to the left.

James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

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James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

Reply
post #17 of 24

nice work--well done--i love the hand crafted look--could each and every minute detail be more perfect--sure i guess--but you did an excellent job--

 

you need to think about jumping off the cliff and setting the cake on it's own board--just think about it--no pressure--just a thought for you--you might want to practice turning a cake out of the pan in the meantime--gathering up some materials--some boards--inflexible boards--a cake box--you'll want a little bit firmer fluffier icing to hold up on the edges--learn to pipe a border--or apply some nice candies for borders--

 

go for it ;) maybe for 2015--i don't know how soon the 2014 awards will be--just a thought--

my cookies are prettier than your cookies because this is the second time i substituted my opalescent sanding sugar when i ran out of sugar to make the batch ha!

 

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my cookies are prettier than your cookies because this is the second time i substituted my opalescent sanding sugar when i ran out of sugar to make the batch ha!

 

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post #18 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by -K8memphis View Post

nice work--well done--i love the hand crafted look--could each and every minute detail be more perfect--sure i guess--but you did an excellent job-- . . . .
Thank you. I try.
Quote:
. . . you need to think about jumping off the cliff and setting the cake on it's own board. . .

Believe me, I've thought of it. When I was much younger, I baked a sheet cake from a recipe that used to be on the Bisquick box, depanned it, and served it on an inverted cookie sheet*. And I haven't exactly got a choice with my dad's birthday cakes: what would be the point of baking a pound cake in a Bundt mold if you weren't planning on depanning? On at least one occasion, I've even depanned a 9x13 sheet cake, just to check the thickness, even though the intention was always to serve it in-pan.

The thing stopping me is transport and storage safety: a 9x13 pan with a snap-on cover is the most secure shipping and storage container I have for a cake; anything else would, especially in my car, run the risk of the cake being thrown around and ruined. I've seen cake carriers, but the only things I've seen that are suitable for shipping a 9x13 securely are decidedly non-cheap.

Another thing I think I'll change for the next one would be to pipe the initial ridges for "The Family Pattern," possibly even in a slightly darker shade, rather than carve furrows with the spatula (but still use alternating cuts with the edge of the spatula to form the pattern)

----
*Speaking of inverted cookie sheets, an old family baking trick is to invert the cookie sheet when baking cookies: you can then slide foil liners on and off quickly, reducing cleanup, and allowing you to prep the entire batch on foil liners.

James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

Reply

James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

Reply
post #19 of 24

cake box? no?

 

i mean you can't fold it under your arm like a football of course but a cake box set on an upside down cookie sheet-- set on top of a roll of paper towels to level out the car seat and the box strapped in with the lower part of the seat belt--done

my cookies are prettier than your cookies because this is the second time i substituted my opalescent sanding sugar when i ran out of sugar to make the batch ha!

 

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my cookies are prettier than your cookies because this is the second time i substituted my opalescent sanding sugar when i ran out of sugar to make the batch ha!

 

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post #20 of 24
Thread Starter 
And actually, I can carry -- or toss around -- a cake in that nice covered Nordic Ware pan as if it were a football; it's that secure.

As I recall, the only cake carriers I could find to accommodate a 9x13 were part of a set, with most of the parts designed to accommodate a <profanity>-load of cupcakes.

James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

Reply

James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

Reply
post #21 of 24
my cookies are prettier than your cookies because this is the second time i substituted my opalescent sanding sugar when i ran out of sugar to make the batch ha!

 

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my cookies are prettier than your cookies because this is the second time i substituted my opalescent sanding sugar when i ran out of sugar to make the batch ha!

 

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post #22 of 24

guide for lettering.......have you tried a small Frozen buttercream transfer?

you could make one for the whole word and place it neatly on top of your cake, if you don't want fondant, gumpaste or chocolate molded letters.

~~We are living in a world today where lemonade is made from artificial flavors and furniture polish is made from real lemons. ~Alfred E. Newman  
3D Figures
(1 photos)
Cupcakes!
(11 photos)
Fishing / Hunting
(10 photos)
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~~We are living in a world today where lemonade is made from artificial flavors and furniture polish is made from real lemons. ~Alfred E. Newman  
3D Figures
(1 photos)
Cupcakes!
(11 photos)
Fishing / Hunting
(10 photos)
Reply
post #23 of 24
Thread Starter 


Cardboard (albeit in a somewhat smaller size than you suggested, in my case) is all fine and dandy if one is selling the cake, and doesn't expect to see the container again, but I was looking at things more along the line of

 

http://www.wilton.com/store/site/product.cfm?id=BFB486EA-802D-F658-02B38E82FDA40AB1&killnav=1

or

http://www.containerstore.com/shop/kitchen/foodStorage/specialty?productId=10023954&N=74066

 

which are decidedly non-cheap (especially after what I just spent on building a new car-cord for my cell phone!)

 

The biggest pain in the butt is that most cake carriers are designed to hold a round layer cake, not a 9x13 sheet cake.


Edited by hbquikcomjamesl - 11/4/13 at 2:05pm

James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

Reply

James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

Reply
post #24 of 24
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