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' Pound Cake' ?

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

have been searching and Googling until I can search and Google no more! : slight exaggeration here but have tried to come to a decision as to what exactly a 'pound cake' is and it's UK equivalent. Am I right in thinking it's  just a basic sponge cake:

1 lb butter

1 lb sugar

1 lb SR flour

8 eggs?

 

It comes recommended in lots of forums and sites as the best recipe as a mix for a Topsy Turvy Cake. have yet to try making one but am edging closer to taking the plunge - any advice welcome- thanks :-) 

post #2 of 5
It's like British Madeira cake. Denser than Victoria sponge.
post #3 of 5

In the US, the original idea behind pound cake was a cake made of four ingredients - a pound each of flour, butter, sugar, and eggs. But as with most foods, recipes and definitions have changed. I think of pound cake as having a tight even grain with a soft crumb. Depending upon the application, this texture is often preferable.

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post #4 of 5

How long do you bake this? Do you just test and watch til it's done?

post #5 of 5

It depends upon your oven temp and pan size. Baking a large bundt or tube pan at 325 degrees F. will take far more than one hour. Small cakes (I often make 2 1/2" cupcake sized cakes) baked at 350 degrees F. can be done in 20 minutes. You're right - test and watch until done!

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