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Explain the price of a cake to my client? - Page 2

post #16 of 21

Hi Ashsantos, I agree with a lot of what the other posters have said.  This is a spectacular cake for a 3-year old's birthday!

I would let the customer know that a single-tier is the standard order for a 3 year old's birthday cake, but if she would like a three-tier then this is obviously going to involve three times the ingredients and three times the labour.

When I started out in the business, I had set prices from day one and this avoided so many awkward conversations with customers expecting the sun, moon & stars for little or nothing in terms of payment.

As for the fact that you're a new decorator, this is irrelevant once you are able to make and decorate the cakes your customers request. So there's no need to charge less than your counterparts in your area.  In fact, it will make it harder in the long run to get your prices up.  In any case, custom cakes are a luxury product. If you charge less than the going rate, people will infer inferior quality.

It's tough when you're starting out to have the confidence to deal with customers' put downs over prices, but you have to stand your ground and be willing to lose the order than cut your rates. Otherwise you will be working for much less than the minimum wage catering to customers whims, when your time would be better off spent with your family and friends.

Best of luck!

post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by CakeGeekUk View Post

 

I would let the customer know that a single-tier is the standard order for a 3 year old's birthday cake,

 

Really? 

"I can do that, because this is my sandbox and I've got the bullsh*% shovel." ~Dianne Sylvan, Author and Lunatic
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
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"I can do that, because this is my sandbox and I've got the bullsh*% shovel." ~Dianne Sylvan, Author and Lunatic
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Birthday Cakes
(2 photos)
Reply
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture View Post

Really? 

The vast majority of our birthday cake orders were single tiers (2 layers, usually round).
post #19 of 21

AZ....I definitely do not want the "new doctor discount!"  LOL 

Debbie - US Army (Retired) --aka "The Cake Sarge"

Good Cake Ain't Cheap! Cheap Cake Ain't Good!
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Debbie - US Army (Retired) --aka "The Cake Sarge"

Good Cake Ain't Cheap! Cheap Cake Ain't Good!
Reply
post #20 of 21
Thread Starter 

Thank you everyone for being honest and for all the advice :) I am learning the "business end" of cakes and honestly this is the first and I am sure not the last client that has had a request like this and wanted it for practically free. I would have loved to make this cake but not for what she was willing to spend LOL. I just don't really know the pricing structure and how I should price everything so that has been a learning curve. I don't know anyone that does what I do so it has been something I have been doing alone. I just didn't know if my prices should be lower because I do not have any formal training. I guess I don't know what is appropriate to charge. I work very hard and am very meticulous when it comes to my cakes so the last thing I want to do is undercut myself. thank again everyone :)

post #21 of 21
It's difficult to figure out pricing, many people struggle with it! There are tons of successful, self taught decorators/designers, including myself icon_wink.gif
The fact the there aren't many (or any) decorators that do what you do in your area that gives you even more of an advantage, definitely charge for your time and try not to second guess yourself. Not everyone can afford a custom cake and it's much better to walk away from an order then work your butt off for someone not willing to pay/appreciate it. I'm glad you took the advice! If you value your work others will too.
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