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Rolling out fondant to cover large cakes without breaking

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

Hello all,

I am relatively new to cake decorating literally only been doing it for a couple of months. My main problem at the moment is when I am covering cakes with fondant, especially large cakes like 10 inch cakes. How do I roll out the fondant evenly and drape it over the cake without making a hole or causing it to break. I find I have to do it multiple times to get it to even stay on the rolling pin to transfer and even after that I still get a hole in it.

I would really appreciate any thoughts and tips.

 

Many thanks in advance.

post #2 of 19
Hiya, if its tearing or getting a hole in it your probably rolling it too thin. You can get guides to help with this. When picking it up to put in on the cake, scoop your arms under it as if they are two long spades - am I making sense. Then as soon as its on the cake start at the top rim for the top inch or so as, as soon as that is stuck to the cake it takes the weight of the rest of the icing draping so it shouldn't crack or tear after that. Then work your way down the cake. When it comes to covering a cake, practice makes perfect x
Louise (www.AlanaLily.com)
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Louise (www.AlanaLily.com)
Please visit and like my Facebook page : www.facebook.com/AlanaLilyChocolatesandCakes
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post #3 of 19
^^ good advice. Use your arms maybe instead of the rolling pain. Also I saw someone rub a small amount of shortening around the top edge of the cake they said it helps with tearing.
post #4 of 19
For large cakes I roll out my fondant on a large silicone mat. Then I lift the whole mat, flip it over onto the cake and "peel" the mat back off the fondant. As a bonus, you don't need to use as much corn starch or powdered sugar to keep the fondant from sticking to your work surface, so it won't dry and crack.
post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thank you all so much. These are all very good tips. I will try them all.
post #6 of 19

I bought myself "the mat" and I must say it has made covering my cakes a breeze. I read good and bad reviews about the product but decided that covering cakes was one of my big issues and I needed all the help I could get and I have never had a problem with mine!

post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 
So what mat would you recommend before I go out and buy one? Thanks
post #8 of 19
What fondant are you using? Some tear more easily than others. This can also happen from over kneading &/or too much color.

I use a stainless steel table (purposefully got the wider one). I use the silly ole wilton pin w the rings to roll. I tried the expensive one from sweet wise, but the static is awful!

If its a large cake, I switch to a PVC pipe cut to 32".

www.VeryDeliciousDesserts.com

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Delicious-Desserts/207874222593145

 

It's never "just cake!"

 

You may get a cake for $way to little but you won't get this cake!

Animal
(4 photos)
 
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www.VeryDeliciousDesserts.com

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Delicious-Desserts/207874222593145

 

It's never "just cake!"

 

You may get a cake for $way to little but you won't get this cake!

Animal
(4 photos)
 
Reply
post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by bolus View Post

So what mat would you recommend before I go out and buy one? Thanks
Some people use "the mat", which they will have to give you info on, I don't know much about it. I just use this silicone mat:
http://www.goldaskitchen.com/merchant.ihtml?pid=6082&step=4
post #10 of 19

I have "The Mat"  and it works very well for me.  On smaller cakes I don't bother, but on larger cakes, it is very helpful because it makes transfer onto the cake so much easier.  There is a bit of a learning curve, and I think it works better with some fondants than others.  I use Massa Grischuna which works beautifully with the mat.  I also use Wilton and Satin Ice (for cake boards only), and they also work well with the mat.  There is a trick - after rolling out a bit, release (peel off) the top piece of plastic and lay it right back down again.  Flip the whole thing over, roll some more, release and flip.  Keep repeating until it is the size and thickness desired.  Releasing now and then keeps it rolling well, and prevents ridges and humps because it is starting to stick. It also releases more easily at the end when you put it on the cake.  It does not work well with the softer stickier fondants in my experience, such as Duff's and fondarific.  With those types I can't seem to get a smooth surface - lots of pockets/indents and doesn't peel off well.  I haven't tried homemade fondant.  HTH!

I'd rather be baking!
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I'd rather be baking!
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post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 

I just saw a video on "the mat" and it looks really interesting but for now I think I'm just going to try using better grade of fondant not just the supermarket brand, roll it out quite thickly and use both arms to lift it up. Over here in the UK we get the regal ice or Dr Otker fondant. can anyone suggest which is better?

Many thanks all for your replies and tips.

post #12 of 19
There is also Renshaw in the uk and I also use Almond Art's own brand, I buy it on the Internet. I have tried the brand called Coverpaste but I found that abit nasty. Basically try different brands and you'll find the brand for you
Louise (www.AlanaLily.com)
Please visit and like my Facebook page : www.facebook.com/AlanaLilyChocolatesandCakes
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Louise (www.AlanaLily.com)
Please visit and like my Facebook page : www.facebook.com/AlanaLilyChocolatesandCakes
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post #13 of 19

Just go to a craft store like Hobby Lobby if you have one close to you and purchase 1/2 yard of clear plastic in the fabric department. You know, it's the same thing your grandmother used to put over her tablecloths to protect them.  Then rub a small amount of shortening on the plastic, roll the fondant out and pickup the plastic with the fondant attached and lay the fondant side onto the cake with the plastic still attached.  The plastic will help support the fondant so it won't tear then using your fondant smoother to adhere the fondant to the top of the cake give it a few glides.  Then gently remove the plastic peeling it back off the fondant carefully.  Cut the excess fondant off the bottom of the cake board using a pizza cutter.  I've taught students to do this for years and it works very well and is cheap.  Be sure to roll the matt around a wrapping paper roll to keep it from getting creases or else the creases will transfer to the fondant the next time you roll.

post #14 of 19

Oops - forgot to mention that is a very inexpensive method.  The cost of the plastic should be under $2.

post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cookie4 View Post

Just go to a craft store like Hobby Lobby if you have one close to you and purchase 1/2 yard of clear plastic in the fabric department. You know, it's the same thing your grandmother used to put over her tablecloths to protect them.  Then rub a small amount of shortening on the plastic, roll the fondant out and pickup the plastic with the fondant attached and lay the fondant side onto the cake with the plastic still attached.  The plastic will help support the fondant so it won't tear then using your fondant smoother to adhere the fondant to the top of the cake give it a few glides.  Then gently remove the plastic peeling it back off the fondant carefully.  Cut the excess fondant off the bottom of the cake board using a pizza cutter.  I've taught students to do this for years and it works very well and is cheap.  Be sure to roll the matt around a wrapping paper roll to keep it from getting creases or else the creases will transfer to the fondant the next time you roll.
Is that stuff food safe?
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