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Poll Results: What do you charge for a PLAIN white 8" two layer cake (vanilla and buttercream with fondant)

Poll expired: Jul 31, 2013  
  • 3% (2)
    $0-$19
  • 3% (2)
    $20-$24
  • 16% (9)
    $25-$35
  • 75% (40)
    Over $35
53 Total Votes  
post #16 of 83
Thread Starter 

Thank you very much!

post #17 of 83

My price for the cake you described would be $460.  Just sayin'.

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Answers to the most often asked questions re: SPS. SPS instructions are on Page 15 of the Sticky at the top of the Cake Decorating Forum. Supplies can be ordered from Oasis Supply, Global or BakeryCrafts.
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post #18 of 83
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s View Post

My price for the cake you described would be $460.  Just sayin'.

Oh goodness, I wish. I just sometimes feel I may not be able to execute a nice enough cake to slap on a big price tag!

post #19 of 83
Thread Starter 

I have reassessed my business plan, come up with a base cost, overhead fee, and labour cost and added a small profit margin and I think I'm okay with having my cakes at $2 a serving (for now..). However, this puts my 12" buttercream cake at $110 ....Yikes. I hope that I can prove to my clients that they truly get what they pay for. I feel more excited to fill an order if I'll actually be paid decently for it.

 

 

Just a side note,

 

do you charge family?

 

I have an order for a close cousin's engagement in a week or two (60 cupcakes, individually wrapped), I feel bad for charging a family member, but those cupcake boxes sure put a dent in my wallet

post #20 of 83
Thread Starter 

BTW, designed my website myself so thank you for the nice comments!

post #21 of 83
When telling someone what their cake will cost I find it helps if you give it to them first as $/serving and then the total. So in your case when someone orders a cake to serve 55 people you tell them that they will need a 12" round cake and that you cN provide that for them for $2/serving which will come to $110. It just seems to help tonpoint out the per serving cost with some people.
As far as family goes, that is really up to you. Only you know what that relationship is like and whether they are likely to take advantage of you. Personally, I would give family a discount but I would make it clear that I am doing so.
Hope you do well with your business! I am in Ontario too. icon_smile.gif
post #22 of 83

If I was telling customers that i was going to give them cake for $2 a serving, no doubt they'd be thrilled. I'd have to say something more like $6.50-$10 a serving and that doesn't go over as well. How can anyone make money selling cake for $2. Sounds more like a donation to me.

post #23 of 83
Thread Starter 

as you wish, thank you so much! I wish you all the best as well.

 

howsweet, I think my clients would walk right out of the consultation if I gave them prices like that!

 

Goodness, you cake decorators have amazing work, but how on earth do you find people willing to pay for cakes like that?! Nobody seems to understand the value of an expertly crafted cake. I want to shake up London Ontario and give them a little wake up call.

post #24 of 83

You prices are a little low, food cost in restaurants/food businesses are usually below 30%. You'd do better to target your food costs at less then 25% of your retail price. But there are people here who's pricing is so off the charts high, that in my area that they'd never get business at that rate. So you have to know what your market will bare. You need to be above the price of cheap stores and below the most expensive (based on your skill level) bakers.

 

If your 'per person' charge for a decorated cake is $2.00 than what do you charge for cupcakes?

 

The reason I ask, is once you set prices on other items (lots of items) you realize in order to sell cheaper items (like cookies, bars or cupcakes) the more expensive items need to be higher priced. So then you re-evaluate your decorated cake pricing because there's far more work in a decorated cake then a swirl on top of a cupcake or cutting a bar cookie. It's all relative!

post #25 of 83

I just have to say that an 8" cake for me would be a bare minimum of $78, and most likely more.

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Beginners, be sure to parrot advice and get your post count up as fast as you can. After all, it's not what you know, it's what people THINK you know.
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post #26 of 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by NSuojhayer View Post

as you wish, thank you so much! I wish you all the best as well.

howsweet, I think my clients would walk right out of the consultation if I gave them prices like that!

Goodness, you cake decorators have amazing work, but how on earth do you find people willing to pay for cakes like that?! Nobody seems to understand the value of an expertly crafted cake. I want to shake up London Ontario and give them a little wake up call.
Shaking them uo ain't gonna happen by slinging cakes people can already get at a grocery store or bakery. The cheapest cake I sell is $150, and it's a tiny little two tier 4 and 6 inch. And you're selling a HUGE three tiered cake for 10 bucks more? Whewwww. If you want to make a statement and attract good paying clients, market yourself as THE place to go for luxury, outrageous, crazy, whatever you think you're good at that no one else can do, or isn't very common in your parts. Read Jason's links and the countless others about pricing and marketing. YOU are not your customer. I am not my customer. Take a break and make some fabulous dummies and photograph them well. Put together some verbiage about what makes you a kick a$$ decorator. Plan plan plan, study and study some more. And if it isn't going to feasible, then get a different job. No use slaving for pennies when you can rightfully pull a reliable pay check in from a job.
post #27 of 83
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture View Post


Shaking them uo ain't gonna happen by slinging cakes people can already get at a grocery store or bakery. The cheapest cake I sell is $150, and it's a tiny little two tier 4 and 6 inch. And you're selling a HUGE three tiered cake for 10 bucks more? Whewwww. If you want to make a statement and attract good paying clients, market yourself as THE place to go for luxury, outrageous, crazy, whatever you think you're good at that no one else can do, or isn't very common in your parts. Read Jason's links and the countless others about pricing and marketing. YOU are not your customer. I am not my customer. Take a break and make some fabulous dummies and photograph them well. Put together some verbiage about what makes you a kick a$$ decorator. Plan plan plan, study and study some more. And if it isn't going to feasible, then get a different job. No use slaving for pennies when you can rightfully pull a reliable pay check in from a job.

I like the way you think.

post #28 of 83
If you think people will balk at per serving prices, then don't sell them that way. I personally don't until I'm dealing with cakes that are around 50 servings and higher. It's easier for people to swallow a price for an entire cake rather than hear each slice is $xx. I certainly don't tell people a baby grand piano is $30 a serving, because that would make them cry. But $1000 for an authentic to scale replica baby grand piano with tufted bench, sheet music, wood paneled floor, hinged top, individually placed.strings, correct number of keys, gold detailing, etc. etc, all completely made out of sugar....it softens it up a bit. Not that I've sold more than one, but that's beside the point, I'm not going to do that work for any less.
post #29 of 83
Oh, and I am in a small town near the border, with a crazy high unemployment rate, rampant welfare abuse, and the fanciest store we have is Dillards. So it's not much to do with where you live either, to a point.
post #30 of 83
Thread Starter 

So, stick to my guns, practice, study cake, practice, study cake, repeat? Wait until a paying customer comes knocking, and then hope for more?

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