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Which type of icing should I use to create a swirl

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

I'm relatively new to cake decorating. If I am wanting to create a swirl pattern on a cake with marshmallow fondant, which type of icing should I use and what can I do to make it work properly? (buttercream vs. RI.... consistency, tips. etc...) This cake is similar to what I'm talking about.

CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 80

 

 

post #2 of 14

I would use royal icing.

post #3 of 14
I would use royal, medium peak with a small amount of piping gel added
post #4 of 14

I just use regular buttercream.  I have several scroll cakes in my gallery.  I just thin it enough so it can be piped smoothly without making your hand uncomfortable (squeezing too hard).

post #5 of 14
Is use buttercream

www.VeryDeliciousDesserts.com

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Delicious-Desserts/207874222593145

 

It's never "just cake!"

 

You may get a cake for $way to little but you won't get this cake!

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www.VeryDeliciousDesserts.com

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Delicious-Desserts/207874222593145

 

It's never "just cake!"

 

You may get a cake for $way to little but you won't get this cake!

Animal
(4 photos)
 
Reply
post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 

did the shortening or butter in your buttercream effect the fondant at all?

post #7 of 14

I pipe buttercream onto fondant. Never had any problems with it

post #8 of 14

I would also use royal icing. An advantage is that if you mess anything up it can be picked off when dry! By the way, those curly cues are harder than they look...practice first on the sides of a cake pan, so you are working vertically like you will be on the cake. I think Wilton makes a set of plastic curly cues that you can use to emboss the fondant slightly - sometimes it's easier to pipe over a design that's already there than do it freehand. 

post #9 of 14

Oh, and I would use a number 2 tip, 3 at a push.

post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayti View Post

I would also use royal icing. An advantage is that if you mess anything up it can be picked off when dry! By the way, those curly cues are harder than they look...practice first on the sides of a cake pan, so you are working vertically like you will be on the cake. I think Wilton makes a set of plastic curly cues that you can use to emboss the fondant slightly - sometimes it's easier to pipe over a design that's already there than do it freehand. 

I can pick my buttercream off as well. Especially when it is on fondant.

post #11 of 14

Yes I could too, but sometimes you get a greasy mark! RI doesn't tend to leave a trace.

post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thanks for all the tips!

post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thanks you all this has been very helpful!

post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dayti View Post

I would also use royal icing. An advantage is that if you mess anything up it can be picked off when dry! By the way, those curly cues are harder than they look...practice first on the sides of a cake pan, so you are working vertically like you will be on the cake. I think Wilton makes a set of plastic curly cues that you can use to emboss the fondant slightly - sometimes it's easier to pipe over a design that's already there than do it freehand. 

My only concern with RI, (I've never used it) but I heard that it dries to a hard, candly-like consistency. Does the "crunch" not bother some when eating it? I guess I get the impression one would bite in to a cake and be met with these hard candy like pieces.

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