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Culinary Institute of America - Page 2

post #16 of 19

sorry, I was in a pretty grumpy mood when I read it, i was probably projecting attitude on to it. anyways, we're not all bad. the school that I was in had really great teachers and I really admire them. like others have said, it will be what you make of it. if you care, and apply yourself you won't be these people that she is referring to.

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post #17 of 19

I want to clarify - I never said anyone that has worked with me was "bad".  No way.  I hope I don't sound disrespectful saying this, but I love each woman I've hired and has worked with me, and I have no problems teaching them anything they want to learn.  But there is a lot of holes I have had to fill because the skills needed to do the type of baking and cake design I do is not taught to those that have come thru my door from culinary school because cake specifically, (to my understanding) it is only briefly touched upon. But I never said they sucked, can't learn, don't want to learn, or are bad.  

 

If you want to be a pastry chef and work for very fancy restaurants or go on Top Chef Just Desserts, then culinary school is totally the way to go.  But if you want to open a cake studio and focus on making special occasion cakes, I feel your money would be better served getting a business degree from a regular university and learning the rest from the private teaching circuit and so on.

 

Or be like me, get none of the above and do it anyway :D

post #18 of 19

I, too, never attended culinary school. Nor did I start out with business skills. I simply enjoyed baking for friends and family. But when I found myself an unemployed single parent with no source of income, I got a permit to start a home-based baking business. I learned as I went and grew my business into an all-scratch bakery and cafe. It was hard-going. Very hard. So while it's possible to open a bakery with no formal education, you would be smart to first take business classes; plus get a job in the industry to learn the daily issues involved in running a business. Good luck!   

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VISIT US at BAKINGFIX

 

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post #19 of 19

Like MimiFix, I also never attended culinary school.  But I've been baking and testing recipes for almost 30 years.  I have a bachelor's degree in marketing and finance, and all kinds of work experience that has helped me run our restaurant.

 

I would recommend finding a "chain" type of bakery to learn the ropes in.  This is where you will learn how to manage inventory levels, manage employees, food safety and holding requirements, etc.  A chain has the advantage of having policies and methods in writing and in place.  There is a way to do everything, without ever flying by the seat of your pants.

 

Liz

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Follow me on my Twitter handle: @Sugar_Iowa

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