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Items with hidden soy

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Other than vegetable shortening, oil and some margarines, are there any products that you have been surprised to learn have soy in them?

 

We have a local bakery that cannot accomodate soy free requests, and I'm wondering if there are other products where you wouldn't expect to find soy.

 

Thanks!

 

Liz

Follow me on my Twitter handle: @Sugar_Iowa

Or on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SugarFineBakedGoodsAndConfections

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Follow me on my Twitter handle: @Sugar_Iowa

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post #2 of 7
# Obvious
Soybean 
Soy Flour / starch / "Vegetable" starch
Soy panthenol
Soy protein / "Protein" / Protein extender / Soy protein isolate or concentrate 
Soy sauce 
Soybean oil / "Vegetable" oil
# less obvious
Hydrolyzed vegetable protein (HVP)
Textured vegetable protein (TVP)
Lecithin  "hydrolyzed protein"
Monodiglyceride
Monosodium glutamate (MSG)
Vitamin E
# unnamed
Thickener / Bulking agent / Emulsifier / Stabilizer 
# gums
Vegetable gum / Guar gum / Gum arabic / Gum tragacanth
 
and
 
# Cross reactors - simulate a soy reaction
Bean family
Carob 
Alfalfa (sprouts)
Cassia or senna
Fenugreek 
lupins
Licorice 
Peanut 
Tamarind 
post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 

Thank you Auzzi!  That is just what I was looking for.  On your "less obvious" list, I notice emulsifiers, and I immediately thought of my LorAnn emulsions.  I will check with them next week and see if soy is one of the emulsifiers.

 

I did not know about the cross reactions - I believe licorice is from anise seed, which is very similar to fennel seed (is that from fenugreek?).

 

And I didn't realize the gums were derived from soy.

 

I really appreciate your help.

 

Liz

Follow me on my Twitter handle: @Sugar_Iowa

Or on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SugarFineBakedGoodsAndConfections

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Follow me on my Twitter handle: @Sugar_Iowa

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post #4 of 7

Cross-reactions are those that are caused by similar chemicals in other products - they are not soy in origin. 

 

Soybean is a member of the Fabaceae or Leguminosae - the legume, pea, or bean family. 
 
It's usually the protein that causes the problems. As proteins are chains of polypeptides containing strings or sequences of amino acids, plants from the same family tend to have polypeptides and/or amino acids in common. Thus the protein from one plant in the family can be similar enough to cause a reaction that soy would normally cause ...
 
Legumes
Peanuts, Liquorice/liquorice, Lupins, Chickpeas
Tamarind, Tamarindus indica, is a unique species of legume tree.
Guar gum comes from seed pods of Guar which is a legume.
Gum arabic is from the sap of two species of the acacia tree, which are legumes.
Gum Tragacanth is from the sap of several species of trees, that are legumes
 
"vegetable" gums could mean anything ..
 
Beans
Runner bean, Lima bean, butter bean,black bean, kidney bean, pinto bean, green bean, navy bean, kidney bean, mung beans etc
Cassia or senna is a member of the bean family. This cassia does not refer to not Cinnamomum aromaticum or cassia cinnamon that is used in baking ..
 
Peas
Black-eyed/garden/Snap/Snow pea, Yellow/white/red pea, green/red lentils
Carob, Alfalfa, Kudzu
Fenugreek, Trigonella foenum-graecum, is a member of the pea family while Fennel, Foeniculum vulgare, is a perennial herb and not related.
 
.
post #5 of 7
Just an FYI, being part of the same family of foods is usually not enough to trigger a reaction if someone is allergies to a different food in that family. For example, many people are allergic to peanuts, but soy allergies are not nearly as widespread.

Soy-free is certainly possible, but it is a pain...more annoying than gluten-free, not as annoying as corn-free.
post #6 of 7

Here's a great resource as well. I point my children's caretakers to this website all the time, and everyone seems to find it very useful. If you scroll to the bottom there is a pdf file that informs on how to read a label for various food allergies to include soy. 

 

http://www.foodallergy.org/allergens/soy-allergy

post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 

Thank you Jason and tdovewings!

 

Liz
 

Follow me on my Twitter handle: @Sugar_Iowa

Or on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SugarFineBakedGoodsAndConfections

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Or on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SugarFineBakedGoodsAndConfections

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