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4 tier wedding cake disaster - outdoors, hot, humid, buttercream, etc.. - Page 2

post #16 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar View Post

Sugarshack's recipe is just an all-shortening one, if I rmember correctly. I have my own opinion about no butter in icing, but that aside, i've seen that kind of icing slide right off a cake in the Virginia heat. So it depends on where you are and the actual weather.

 

I used that recipe on all my cakes for several years now without any problems. I live in NE Ohio which will reach into the 90's June-August regularly. Last summer I deliveryed an all buttercream cake to an outdoor venue in over 90 degree heat without any problems. The photographer sent me a couple pictures of the cake she took during the reception (a couple hours after delivery) and the cake still looked great. I can understand you have an opinion about "buttercream" with any butter but if the recipe works for the envirornment it is used in and tastes great - I have no problem using it. My brides love it and I never worry about melting.
"who says you can't have your cake and eat it too?"
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"who says you can't have your cake and eat it too?"
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post #17 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by cai0311 View Post

 

I used that recipe on all my cakes for several years now without any problems. I live in NE Ohio which will reach into the 90's June-August regularly. Last summer I deliveryed an all buttercream cake to an outdoor venue in over 90 degree heat without any problems. The photographer sent me a couple pictures of the cake she took during the reception (a couple hours after delivery) and the cake still looked great.I can understand you have an opinion about "buttercream" with any butter but if the recipe works for the envirornment it is used in and tastes great - I have no problem using it. My brides love it and I never worry about melting.

My point is that the humidity also plays a role. I don't know what the humidity is in Ohio, but it can get pretty heinous here, especially since we're relatively close to the river. I've seen all-shortening buttercreams slide off the cake partly because of the heat, but also because it's absorbing the moisture in the air and turning into liquid.

post #18 of 44
I just posted this is a seperate thread but ill repost here, basically you did the right thing. My cake was fondant covered and it still didn't survive!:

I feel for you this past New Years I did a tipsy turvy 4 tier for a friends wedding I'm in Australia and our summers are HOT well of course it hit the hottests day on record for the year! 46 degrees celcius (about 115 F) and the cake was on a table sitting in direct sunlight all day. There was nothing I could do about it and it was an outdoor wedding on a property so nowhere else to put the cake. After a few hours (before the reception had even started) the cake couldn't take it anymore and one side of the cake just slid off. I was horrified! Thank god she was a friend and understood it was out of my control. It literally started to melt!
post #19 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Petals_and_Pearls_cakes View Post

I just posted this is a seperate thread but ill repost here, basically you did the right thing. My cake was fondant covered and it still didn't survive!:

I feel for you this past New Years I did a tipsy turvy 4 tier for a friends wedding I'm in Australia and our summers are HOT well of course it hit the hottests day on record for the year! 46 degrees celcius (about 115 F) and the cake was on a table sitting in direct sunlight all day. There was nothing I could do about it and it was an outdoor wedding on a property so nowhere else to put the cake. After a few hours (before the reception had even started) the cake couldn't take it anymore and one side of the cake just slid off. I was horrified! Thank god she was a friend and understood it was out of my control. It literally started to melt!

Oh that's awful! And there's absolutely nothing you can do if it's that hot and the cake is in the sun. I've had deliveries to places where the humidity was so bad the fondant looked wet and shiny and just wouldn't dry out, but at least they had it in the shade.

post #20 of 44
What if you don't like all shortening recipes? I really dislike shortening buttercream, the cake I got for my niece's engagement was shortening buttercream, and you can taste it. I didn't make the cake because we were so far, and though the cake was gorgeous, it tasted artificial. Is there any butter buttercream recipe that can be used in the summer? What about refrigerating the cake before delivery?
post #21 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by nancylee61 View Post

What if you don't like all shortening recipes? I really dislike shortening buttercream, the cake I got for my niece's engagement was shortening buttercream, and you can taste it. I didn't make the cake because we were so far, and though the cake was gorgeous, it tasted artificial. Is there any butter buttercream recipe that can be used in the summer? What about refrigerating the cake before delivery?

If the cake is going to be inside it isn't an issue, but any cake that's sitting outside in the direct sun is going to melt even if it's all-shortening. Heat and sugar don't play well together. If a cake is going to be outside in the summer I will only do fondant on it, and if thy won't go for that they can go get it from someone else. I don't need to deal with someone who thinks the laws of physics don't apply to her.
post #22 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar View Post

If the cake is going to be inside it isn't an issue, but any cake that's sitting outside in the direct sun is going to melt even if it's all-shortening. Heat and sugar don't play well together. If a cake is going to be outside in the summer I will only do fondant on it, and if thy won't go for that they can go get it from someone else. I don't need to deal with someone who thinks the laws of physics don't apply to her.

I agree. I think I am going to have this same policy.
Thanks!
post #23 of 44

It's not your fault at all, if you explained all that information to the bride and the placement of the cake was her decision then you made it clear. That type of heat is too much for almost any type of cake so you did well, she probably needs to talk to the caterers or the people who moved the cake, not you so much. 

post #24 of 44

Firstly....I think you did everything correctly.  I have a clause in my contract that says I am not responsible for cake left in temperures over 75% or direct sun.  It also states that I am not responsible for any damage the cake receives once I have delivered it and set it up

"Cheap cakes are not good, and good cakes are not cheap"
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post #25 of 44

I absolutely hate baking things in summer for this reason but that's when everyone wants to have parties! Next week I get to decorate 200 cupcakes at work with buttercream... in a crowded kitchen that has no air circulation, humidity you can swim in and a temperature no less than 35C. Grr.

 

Sometimes for important things, I try to use half shortening but I find it's already so soft to begin with and when it melts, it can't be removed from any of my tools because it's impossible to break down. <- that's why it sticks to your mouth and inside all of your arteries when you eat it. Plus the smell and the taste of it is so awful. I don't think other people really notice it though.

post #26 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by nancylee61 View Post

What if you don't like all shortening recipes? I really dislike shortening buttercream, the cake I got for my niece's engagement was shortening buttercream, and you can taste it. I didn't make the cake because we were so far, and though the cake was gorgeous, it tasted artificial. Is there any butter buttercream recipe that can be used in the summer? What about refrigerating the cake before delivery?

I know some will disagree with me but I was told by a very successful caker and culinary instructor that he uses IMBC for outdoor weddings in August here in VA. He does use some shortening (hi ratio or with trans fat) but you absolutely cannot taste it. Since then I use it all of the time....and I LOVE it and so do my customers, friends, family.... "Italian meringue's unwavering stability allows the resulting desserts to be finished in the oven, frozen, or torched to dramatic effect."-Martha Stewart  I did 1 wedding cake outdoors in a covered arena and it was very hot. My icing stood up fine. I was so worried because it stood for about 2-2 1/2 hours.

post #27 of 44

I'm sure a bit of shortening would help stabilize a meringue buttercream, but in the quote by Martha Stewart, I believe she is discussing Italian Meringue, not Italian Meringue Buttercream.  I've never seen anyone put IMBC in an oven or torch it, but you do that with plain Italian Meringue quite often (pies, baked Alaska, etc.).

 

Liz
 

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post #28 of 44

Good point..I did not read that closely. But as I have said I have read other supporting articles and spoken with bakers/chefs. Although I have only done 1 wedding cake that was out in the heat I also us it on almost all of my cakes (many outdoor parties) and have never had a single issue.

post #29 of 44
This is what happens to a cake in he Virginia heat, you can also look at the vido for Texas heat,

I wouldn't trust IMBC outside for any length of time. Most cakes will sit outside for 5 hours os ro before the cake cutting, unless they move the cutting time up. If I was going to use IMBC I would experiment with it first to see what would happen, but I know that when it starts to melt it gets soft really fast. http://acaketorememberva.blogspot.com/2012/05/cakes-will-melt-in-heat.html
post #30 of 44

Before I did the cake I set the IMBC out in the sun (not the same batch I used on the cake! LOL) It is a very soft icing (which is why I love it!) but if your cakes have settled properly I don't see that as a problem. It was soft but it did not come off of the cake.

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