Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Recipes › Which type of buttercream stays better?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Which type of buttercream stays better?

Poll Results: What kind of icing do you prefer for a wedding cake?

 
  • 9% (2)
    Italian BC
  • 38% (8)
    Swiss BC
  • 19% (4)
    Genache
  • 19% (4)
    Regular BC
  • 14% (3)
    Other, Please leave a comment to tell me what it is!
21 Total Votes  
post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

Hi, 

 

I have experimented with American, Italian, and Swiss BC, For a birthday cake, American/reg BC is just fine and holds great!

 

But, for a wedding, in which taste is also important, which one is better? IMBC or SMBC? 

 

Also, does anyone know what  Mouselline is? Found that term while reading on another forum. 

 

Thanks

post #2 of 17

In my 30+ yrs of decorating I have always used good ol' ABC.  I love it and so do my customers.

To me using IMBC is like eating a whole stick of butter right out of the pkg :(

Not sure what you mean by 'hold'.  In dry, HOT central CA ABC works just fine.  It does not melt or cause me any problems.

post #3 of 17

I love SMBC, but my family thinks it is like eating pure butter.  ABC is always a hit!

post #4 of 17

I prefer IMBC or SMBC (but I don't add all the butter as indicated in the recipe and add vanilla and/or other flavorings), so I've never experienced the too much buttery taste (except once when i did add all the butter indicated in From Scratch SF's SMBC recipe).

 

ABC- it's too way sweet (and a bit fake tasting too) for me and honestly I'm not into the idea of shortening mixed w/ sugar on my cake. it sort of grosses me out- especially that high ratio stuff. 

 

I do use ganache under my fondant 99% of the time.

post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 

Thank you all ! :)

post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakefat View Post

I prefer IMBC or SMBC (but I don't add all the butter as indicated in the recipe and add vanilla and/or other flavorings), so I've never experienced the too much buttery taste (except once when i did add all the butter indicated in From Scratch SF's SMBC recipe).

 

ABC- it's too way sweet (and a bit fake tasting too) for me and honestly I'm not into the idea of shortening mixed w/ sugar on my cake. it sort of grosses me out- especially that high ratio stuff. 

 

I do use ganache under my fondant 99% of the time.

ABC frosting can be made with butter only. The shortening is not required.

 

Quote:

Don't aspire to make a living, aspire to make a difference.

 

 

Reply

 

Quote:

Don't aspire to make a living, aspire to make a difference.

 

 

Reply
post #7 of 17
I always go with ABC. Besides in culinary school when we used SMBC. And I also use butter instead of shortening.. Although a small amount of shortening can stabilize it a bit without the filmy taste..
post #8 of 17

as far as I know ABC means that the butter cream was not cooked. can be made with butter and or shortening. I usually put shortening when im making a cake in the middle of summer, i live in Texas where summer temps are 110*, or when I need a really white butter cream.    Can you share your ABC recipe?  my IBC  does  not taste too much like butter, according to me, here is my recipe.

 


*Mod edited to remove mixing instructions which is a possible copyright violation.
post #9 of 17

i put Other because i have been doing quite a few combos of SMBC and ABC for weddings.  The SMBC with fresh strawberries or caramel for fillings and then the ABC for the outer buttercream layer because the cake will be outside or in a warm area.  Customers are building their own flavors at the consult, and this is often a great compromise. 

post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by j92383 View Post

ABC frosting can be made with butter only. The shortening is not required.

 

I always forget about this as I don't make it anymore and haven't in the longest time. Is this is a crusting buttercream? 

 

Also, if you do add a bit of shortening in it, for stability, does this crust as well? 

 

thanks!

post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakefat View Post

 

I always forget about this as I don't make it anymore and haven't in the longest time. Is this is a crusting buttercream? 

 

Also, if you do add a bit of shortening in it, for stability, does this crust as well? 

 

thanks!

Sorry haven't been on here a couple days. Yes it does crust. I've only used shortening once or twice it does make it more stable but I also find that it doesn't crust as well. And like you I just don't care for the idea of shortening in butter cream. I don't care what anyone says I can taste it when butter cream is made it. 

 

Quote:

Don't aspire to make a living, aspire to make a difference.

 

 

Reply

 

Quote:

Don't aspire to make a living, aspire to make a difference.

 

 

Reply
post #12 of 17
Mousseline probably refers to Rose Levy Beranbaum's French buttercream recipe (called Mousseline Buttercream in her book) which is a meringue buttercream made with the whole egg. It's very rich and delicious, but obviously it is more yellow than say IMBC.

I used IMBC on my own wedding cake but where I live it's not as popular as the sweeter stuff. I've modified a recipe which uses powdered sugar but I use a considerable amount of whipping cream to lighten the texture. It is no longer crusting after my modifications but I use a scraper anyway so crusting isn't important to me.
post #13 of 17

RLB's Mousseline buttercream is an Italian meringue buttercream made with all whites.  I made it many times before switching to SMBC.  ( Her "Classic Buttercream"  is made with yolks ).  SMBC tastes much less buttery and is my absolute favorite.  The recipe I use uses the lesser amounts of butter.  I also really like the fluffy American buttercream that I learned of from CC.  It is half way between the meringue buttercreams and ABC.  

I'd rather be baking!
Reply
I'd rather be baking!
Reply
post #14 of 17
Thanks for clearing that up yortma. I didn't have my book in front of me to verify the recipe. Incidentally, I use Warren Browns IMBC recipe and Rose's whole egg (Neoclassical) buttercream.
post #15 of 17

I was taught that Mousseline is a general term which refers to jam mixed into whipped cream (or bc) so it is lightly colored and flavored :) I think it is also used to describe anything whipped cream has been added into for body, like hollandaise sauce. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Recipes
Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Recipes › Which type of buttercream stays better?