Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › How Do I? › Pipe neatly on the side of the cake.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Pipe neatly on the side of the cake.

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I want to pipe something like the arches on the second tier of this cake:

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/58907930@N04/8273662105/in/photostream/

 

I can pipe those pointing down rather than up - but my arches are very untidy, and I'm sure I'm doing something wrong.

 

I've been googling tutorials, but can't find anything that shows me that.

 

Does anyone have any advice (apart from practice more - I'm all over that, but I'm sure there's a technique I'm missing), or a tutorial they can point me towards?

 

Thanks!

post #2 of 12

Have you looked tutorials up under string work. I think they use royal icing!  I have seen it also called oriental string work. Hope that helpsicon_smile.gif
 

post #3 of 12

It's done with royal icing(string work)  Most important is marking off spaces before you start using a measuring tape or paper you put around cake and then mark off evenly.  Practice working on sides of cakes... it's so much easier piping something flat like a cookie.

  I have been taught to use real egg whites for royal icing when piping like this... much stronger

Of course chocolate is the answer!
Reply
Of course chocolate is the answer!
Reply
post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 

Yes, I've been using royal icing.

 

I found this video for oriental stringwork (oriental was the word I was missing!):

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dVn-iwdvZro

 

where the arches pointing upwards are done by flipping the cake over.

 

Is that what everyone does? So in the cake I posted earlier, would the second tier be turned over to pipe those arches? Because I can do that. I thought there was a way people were piping those neat arches with the cake sitting upright.

post #5 of 12

Take you some calculator paper, wrap it around the sides of your cake till the two ends meet and cut it. Then take your paper and fold it evenly in half, then fold that half in half again evenly until you have it folded with how many times you want to do swags around the cake. Some people may fold it 6 or 8 times. Then draw an upside down line on top and cut it. You will end up cutting all 6 or 8 folded sides equally depending on how many times you folded it.  Then you can pin it on your cake once you are ready to pipe to use as a guide for going around the cake. I have seen some people just take toothpicks and mark their lines on top of their cut paper around cake then they pipe and follow the toothpick lines.

 

I guess everyone does it differently. This is my way. Maybe someone else here that is more experienced will have a better way to do it. Good luck/Mary

post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 

I'm not explaining myself well, I don't think.

 

I'm using royal icing on fondant. I get how to make sure it's all spaced out evenly. I can pipe swags, because I can touch the icing to the cake, and when you pipe a line, it falls in a nice neat swag.

 

However, when I want to pipe the same curve, but with the curve pointing upwards, like a rainbow, rather than falling downwards, I'm having trouble getting the same neat, even line.

 

I'm wondering if there's a particular technique I'm missing, or if people are just piping the line and can do it more neatly than I can.

 

If people are just neater than me, it's fine and I'll practice some more.

post #7 of 12
To me it looks traced. Mayne take a round cutter and indent a little and then trave that as steady as possible?
Hey everybody! Check out google.com ! This is clearly an attempt to direct traffic onto that site and away from cake central. Because everyone knows you can only have one browser open!
Reply
Hey everybody! Check out google.com ! This is clearly an attempt to direct traffic onto that site and away from cake central. Because everyone knows you can only have one browser open!
Reply
post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcaulir View Post

I'm not explaining myself well, I don't think.

 

I'm using royal icing on fondant. I get how to make sure it's all spaced out evenly. I can pipe swags, because I can touch the icing to the cake, and when you pipe a line, it falls in a nice neat swag.

 

However, when I want to pipe the same curve, but with the curve pointing upwards, like a rainbow, rather than falling downwards, I'm having trouble getting the same neat, even line.

 

I'm wondering if there's a particular technique I'm missing, or if people are just piping the line and can do it more neatly than I can.

 

If people are just neater than me, it's fine and I'll practice some more.

I think it's done exactly as you described earlier, traditional stringwork with the tier flipped upside down.

post #9 of 12

Yep. I'd flip it upside down to do the string work. Not that I've ever done string work, though it just seems to me the best way to accomplish it.

post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks for your input, everyone. I'll flip it over and give it a go!
post #11 of 12

Perosnally, I don't think I'd be comfortable flipping a sugarpasted cake.  I'd be worried.  But that's just me.

 

I think a tilting turntable is an absolute must for piping something like this....  so that you can have it tilting away from you...

 

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=tilting+turntable&client=firefox-a&hs=bb0&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=0o-YUe_REI3EPJvqgKgM&ved=0CAoQ_AUoAQ&biw=1680&bih=916

 

Good luck - very pretty cake!

 

Suzanne x
 

Inside this fat body, there's a thin woman screaming to get out...... but I can usually shut her up with chocolate!
Reply
Inside this fat body, there's a thin woman screaming to get out...... but I can usually shut her up with chocolate!
Reply
post #12 of 12

mcaulir definitely tip your cake over.  Mark your cake with pinpricks for the start and end of each drop.  Don't try and follow the line but start with your tip at one pinprick and pull away slightly from the cake, squeezing until your length is right for the drop and reattach at the next pinprick.  Practice, practice, practice. If you are having trouble getting even drops you can make a mask out of baking paper with the drops cut into it and wrap it around your cake to use as a guide.

Relznik flipping fondant covered cakes is not a problem.  You just rub a bit or cornflour on the top, place a cardboard round over the top of your cake and then flip on to that.  If your cake is covered properly the fondant will stay put.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: How Do I?
Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › How Do I? › Pipe neatly on the side of the cake.