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Cake mix that is closest to home made - Page 3

post #31 of 47

I always put cling wrap over the cut areas of my cake that has no frosting which helps them to stay moist and fresh.
 

post #32 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by remnant3333 View Post

I always put cling wrap over the cut areas of my cake that has no frosting which helps them to stay moist and fresh.
 

 

Thank you for that suggestion.  My problem was with cupcakes though. 

post #33 of 47

Cupcakes don't last long enough around my house to go stale. I always give them out to the neighbors so they are normally all eaten the same day I make them. I have never had them around long enough to know that they go stale quickly. Hopefully someone here has advice for keeping them fresher for a longer time.

post #34 of 47

Cupcakes will go stale quicker - they're not really meant to last for 3 days.

 

Try a mudcake recipe for cupcakes, though. They stay fine for days.

post #35 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by darkchocolate View Post

I love homemade cookies and don't care for the packaged versions.  On the other hand, in my experience a box mix (doctored-my preference) stays fresher tasting much longer than scratch cakes. 

They stay softer longer because they have propylene glycol in them, which is used in laxatives and antifreeze to keep things soft and lower the freezing temp.

 

As far as scratch cake goes, you have to have a balanced recipe, a good mixing technique and the right baking time to get a good result. I doubt that the best bakers in the world use cake mixes, too...A lot of the most well-known decorators do because they're not bakers, but if you went to a pastry competition and brought out the cake mix they'd throw you out after wetting themselves from laughing at you.

post #36 of 47

I'm really interested to start this pastry school. One of the students at the buffet said they purchased their puff pastry (she was culinary side of the house who dabbles in baking) others told me the chef's make it...still others say the students make it. This is their first year with students who are solely baking/pastry. Already signed my contract for $30K to see what it's all about. Actually that is not a bad price...

post #37 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcaulir View Post

Cupcakes will go stale quicker - they're not really meant to last for 3 days.

 

Try a mudcake recipe for cupcakes, though. They stay fine for days.

I have been thinking more about scratch cakes and I guess it is like when I tell my girls that my homemade bread is better eaten within 24 hours because there are no preservatives in it.

 

Do you have a link to a good mudcake recipe?  I have never had mudcake before.

post #38 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar View Post

They stay softer longer because they have propylene glycol in them, which is used in laxatives and antifreeze to keep things soft and lower the freezing temp.

 

As far as scratch cake goes, you have to have a balanced recipe, a good mixing technique and the right baking time to get a good result. I doubt that the best bakers in the world use cake mixes, too...A lot of the most well-known decorators do because they're not bakers, but if you went to a pastry competition and brought out the cake mix they'd throw you out after wetting themselves from laughing at you.

No preservatives also is why my homemade bread is better eaten freshly baked or at least within 24 hours.  I'm sure scratch cakes are similar.

 

In my experimenting, the recipe that stayed the freshest, the longest, had sour cream in it.  The other recipes were either butter or oil with milk.  I do know not to overbeat my batter because of the gluten. I also always check about 5 minutes early so I don't over bake.

 

I am considering using half oil and half butter in a recipe that we liked the flavor and texture, it just went dry too soon.  I also want to stir a little sour cream into my milk to see if that helps.

post #39 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by darkchocolate View Post

No preservatives also is why my homemade bread is better eaten freshly baked or at least within 24 hours.  I'm sure scratch cakes are similar.

 

In my experimenting, the recipe that stayed the freshest, the longest, had sour cream in it.  The other recipes were either butter or oil with milk.  I do know not to overbeat my batter because of the gluten. I also always check about 5 minutes early so I don't over bake.

 

I am considering using half oil and half butter in a recipe that we liked the flavor and texture, it just went dry too soon.  I also want to stir a little sour cream into my milk to see if that helps.

I wouldn't substitute oil for butter, but I think that I did have a recipe that I subbed out the milk for sour cream and that worked well. If you start messing around with the butter just remember that it's not 100% fat, it also has some water and milk solids, so you have to adjust for that. I think it's something like 80% fat and 15% water, so if you're multiplying it a lot you have to adjust the liquids to a certain extent.

post #40 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar View Post

I wouldn't substitute oil for butter, but I think that I did have a recipe that I subbed out the milk for sour cream and that worked well. If you start messing around with the butter just remember that it's not 100% fat, it also has some water and milk solids, so you have to adjust for that. I think it's something like 80% fat and 15% water, so if you're multiplying it a lot you have to adjust the liquids to a certain extent.

You are right about the butter and oil.  In fact, I was just reading today about how you could interchange Crisco/vegetable shortening for butter because it is a solid fat but that wouldn't work for oil and butter because of the water content.  I guess I was remembering how some interchange oil for butter in cake mix recipes.

 

Thanks for the reminder.

post #41 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by darkchocolate View Post

You are right about the butter and oil.  In fact, I was just reading today about how you could interchange Crisco/vegetable shortening for butter because it is a solid fat but that wouldn't work for oil and butter because of the water content.  I guess I was remembering how some interchange oil for butter in cake mix recipes.

Thanks for the reminder.

You still have to adjust the liquids if you use veg shortening instead of butter, but just slightly. It won't taste as good, either!
post #42 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar View Post


You still have to adjust the liquids if you use veg shortening instead of butter, but just slightly. It won't taste as good, either!

Thank you for letting me know about adjusting as well with shortening and butter.  I agree that I like the taste of butter much better.

post #43 of 47
Homemade cakes are hard to make - it took me a long time to figure out a recipe I liked. I highly recommend the Cake Bible by Rose Levy Berenbaum if you want to really learn about scratch baking. You must be sure to use the ingredients she recommends for best results - cake flour, good quality butter, real vanilla, cake strips on your pans, a calibrated oven, a kitchen scale to weigh your ingredients, having them at the correct temperature.

Box mixes have chemical stabilizers, preservatives, and softeners that make them foolproof. Scratch baking takes work and practice, but you'll find that after you get a good recipe and start eating scratch cakes, you can then taste the chemicals in the box mix if you try to go back.
post #44 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by sarahgale314 View Post

Homemade cakes are hard to make - it took me a long time to figure out a recipe I liked. I highly recommend the Cake Bible by Rose Levy Berenbaum if you want to really learn about scratch baking. You must be sure to use the ingredients she recommends for best results - cake flour, good quality butter, real vanilla, cake strips on your pans, a calibrated oven, a kitchen scale to weigh your ingredients, having them at the correct temperature.

Box mixes have chemical stabilizers, preservatives, and softeners that make them foolproof. Scratch baking takes work and practice, but you'll find that after you get a good recipe and start eating scratch cakes, you can then taste the chemicals in the box mix if you try to go back.

 

Thank you for the book recommendation, I'll check into that book.

post #45 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by darkchocolate View Post

I have been thinking more about scratch cakes and I guess it is like when I tell my girls that my homemade bread is better eaten within 24 hours because there are no preservatives in it.

 

Do you have a link to a good mudcake recipe?  I have never had mudcake before.

http://www.exclusivelyfood.com.au/2006/07/chocolate-mud-cake-recipe.html

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