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Underbaked Cake----What am I doing wrong?! - Page 2

post #16 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stitches View Post

Ah, I just re-read one of your posts when I checked the recipe. 

 

"Here's the recipe I used (except for the cream part, I used all milk):"

 

That's where you went wrong. You can't use all milk, milk doesn't have as much fat as the cream. Believe it or not, that small chemical difference is all that it takes to change the chemistry of that batter. All milk made the batter leaner and wetter so the tiny air pockets collapsed on each other as the cake baked. 

 

Thanks everyone for taking the time to reply to this.  This was a new recipe for me and when I had to rebake it I had to go back to the store for more cake flour and decided to get the heavy cream too.  The second try came out much better.

 

I will also remember to double-check my leavening agents going forward. When I tripled the recipe I could have mis-measured.

 

I appreciate everyone's replies and help. I love Cake Central!

post #17 of 24

All that chocolate came from ONE cup of batter mixed with chocolate?  Did you stir the chocolate mix into the batter by hand, or did you use your mixer?  Given that the chocolate is concentrated in the center and it domed, you may have over mixed the chocolate part, or mixed it too vigorously.

 

I'll agree that using the milk rather than the cream would have upset the fat balance and led to issues.

 

I will also say that I would NEVER compress the dome on my chocolate cakes, especially not while they're still warm.  The result would be a dense soggy mess. 

 

I also note that the recipe says to allow the cakes to cool completely in the pan, are you sure the 12 minutes was long enough? 

deborahanne

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deborahanne

http://grandmasugarskitchen.blogspot.com/
http://fromlinetocolor.blogspot.ca/

Life begins at 325° F, and, yes, that IS powdered sugar in my hair.

Baby Shower
(6 photos)
Birthday Cakes
(6 photos)
Christmas
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post #18 of 24

A similar thing happened to me a few weeks back. I checked with a stick and it came out dry, but once it had cooled and I sliced it it wasn't baked in the center. I figured out that it was because I dropped the oven door (by accident) during baking. Maybe something similar might have happened to you??

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post #19 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakeyouverymuch View Post

All that chocolate came from ONE cup of batter mixed with chocolate?  Did you stir the chocolate mix into the batter by hand, or did you use your mixer?  Given that the chocolate is concentrated in the center and it domed, you may have over mixed the chocolate part, or mixed it too vigorously.

 

I'll agree that using the milk rather than the cream would have upset the fat balance and led to issues.

 

I will also say that I would NEVER compress the dome on my chocolate cakes, especially not while they're still warm.  The result would be a dense soggy mess. 

 

I also note that the recipe says to allow the cakes to cool completely in the pan, are you sure the 12 minutes was long enough? 

I tripled the recipe, so I used 3 cups of batter mixed with the chocolate (x3).  I stirred the chocolate by hand and just until it came together, not vigorously.

 

I honestly didn't notice that the recipe said to let cool in the pan. In the past when I have done that I wasn't able to get the cakes out of the pan without tearing them. I have started using parchment on the bottoms and sides of my pans, so that shouldn't be an issue going forward either. I was wondering if maybe I should have let them cool completely in the pan since the parchment would prevent them from sticking once totally cool.

post #20 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tarttokig View Post

A similar thing happened to me a few weeks back. I checked with a stick and it came out dry, but once it had cooled and I sliced it it wasn't baked in the center. I figured out that it was because I dropped the oven door (by accident) during baking. Maybe something similar might have happened to you??

No, I didn't have anything unusual like that happen.

post #21 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkern777 View Post

I am using a single batter, separating it, and adding chocolate to it. I had to triple the recipe for the cakes I was doing and had a little left over.

 

Here's the recipe I used (except for the cream part, I used all milk):

http://www.marthastewartweddings.com/224423/marble-cake

So, this is interesting. I have the Martha Stewart's Wedding Cakes book. I used the Marble Cake recipe from that for my daughter's wedding cake ( I used the mocha version). It has the same picture as this link but the recipe calls for buttermilk, not a mix of milk and water. The recipe in the book is on a larger scale but all the ingredients aren't exactly tripled so maybe something is off in the online, smaller version?

 

5 1/4 cups cake flour

2 tbs baking powder

1 1/4 tsp salt

1 1/2 cups unsalted butter

3 cups + 3 tbs sugar

9 large eggs

1 tbs vanilla

2 cups buttermilk

1/2 cup + 1 tbs cocoa

(+6 tbs espresso powder for mocha)

3/4 cup boiling water

 

It's one of the few MS cake recipes that adusted well to my high altitude.

post #22 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkern777 View Post

It is not burned. That is dark chocolate cake that you are seeing.

 

It didn't fall, I had to cut a slight dome off to level.

 

This picture is of the cake sliced through them middle horizontally to add filling.

 

I have no idea what the holes are, unless they were air holes. I always tap my pans on the table to try to remove air bubbles before I put them in the oven, so I'm not sure what that is about.

 

I forgot to mention that this was a recipe that I had never tried, but gets good reviews. It was Martha Stewart's marble wedding cake recipe. I did have to make a change from using half heavy cream and half milk to all milk because I didn't have the cream on hand. It made the batter really runny, so the vanilla and chocolate parts ended up blending together instead of marbling.

 

I tasted the dome that I cut off and it tasted great, was not overcooked or dry. I just want to know if anyone else has had their cake testers come out clean and the cake was still basically raw in the center.

If you change someone's recipe you are not using their recipe , that would be your problem. 

post #23 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elcee View Post

So, this is interesting. I have the Martha Stewart's Wedding Cakes book. I used the Marble Cake recipe from that for my daughter's wedding cake ( I used the mocha version). It has the same picture as this link but the recipe calls for buttermilk, not a mix of milk and water. The recipe in the book is on a larger scale but all the ingredients aren't exactly tripled so maybe something is off in the online, smaller version?

 

5 1/4 cups cake flour

2 tbs baking powder

1 1/4 tsp salt

1 1/2 cups unsalted butter

3 cups + 3 tbs sugar

9 large eggs

1 tbs vanilla

2 cups buttermilk

1/2 cup + 1 tbs cocoa

(+6 tbs espresso powder for mocha)

3/4 cup boiling water

 

It's one of the few MS cake recipes that adusted well to my high altitude.

That looks like the one I had used in the past, found here:

http://www.marthastewart.com/339716/marble-cake

 

I tried the other one instead because it was listed as working well for wedding cakes. I used all milk in mine (not buttermilk) the first time because I was out of cream. In my head I had thought that it took buttermilk (now I know why I thought that) so I thought whole milk would work.

 

I noticed another difference in the 2 Martha Stewart recipes.....the one that contains buttermilk says to cream the butter and sugar with the paddle attachment and the one with heavy cream says to use the wire whisk attachment. I usually use the paddle attachment unless the recipe says to do otherwise.

 

Would the whisk cause the cream to thicken more than the paddle? It is not whipped by itself like whipped cream, but rather mixed with the milk and added in alternated with the flour. I prefer the paddle, but used the whisk the second time I baked when I used the cream/milk mixture. 

post #24 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chellescakes View Post

If you change someone's recipe you are not using their recipe , that would be your problem. 

I wasn't rating the MS recipe. I was simply stating what I had done so that people who wanted to try to help could do so with all of the information.  My question was why my cake tester came out clean as if it was done, but was not actually done.

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