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Freezing/Thawing Cakes

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Hello,

 

Before I tell you my query, I would like to say that I know there are already several threads on this topic but after reading several of them I still haven't found my answer.

 

Firstly, I'm going to explain what I'm trying to achieve. I need a sponge cake covered and filled with whipped fresh cream for lunch tomorrow. I've already baked the 8 inch sponge, let it cool for 10 minutes in the tin, then wrapped it in two layers of cling film/saran wrap, then one layer of foil and finally put it in the freezer.

 

Here's where I need help. As this is the first time I've frozen a sponge and I did it to test the method. I don't know how to go about defrosting/thawing it. I know I can fill it and crumb coat it straight after I take it out of the freezer but then what do I do?

 

Do I let it carry on thawing before I completely frost it or can I frost it with the freshly whipped cream and then let it thaw?

 

If I have to wait to let it thaw before I finish frosting it, how long do I let it thaw for approximately?

 

If I have to wait, do I cover it back up with the cling film or not?

 

And if anyone's wondering why whipped cream instead of IMBC/SMBC, it's because here in lLondon fresh cream cakes are really popular.

 

I hope all you great people can help me.

 

Kind Regards

post #2 of 9

Can you please explain why you would both freeze and thaw a cake half a day ahead of its being served?

 

It suffices to simply let the cake get completely to room temperature, (add jam or curd filling) and cover with whipped cream, and immediately place it into the fridge for overnight.  The whole cake should be in a box to prevent transfer of odours from other foods in the fridge.

 

Whipped cream is not like icing, it keeps the cake moist but it must be refrigerated at all times if possible. Crumb coating with whipped cream is a quick smear with a spatula, there is no chilling required  before the final coat. 

 

And please reconsider  freezing a warm cake...it is bad for the cake and bad for your freezer.  Letting the cake cool completely to room temperature is the best way to avoid blowouts when you would cover with fondant. When an unfrosted cake must be frozen for storage, it must be completely cooled before it can be wrapped.

 

If your sponge is too dry, you need to address issues like how you measure flour and how long you cook...a simple sandwich cake should never need the contortions that you have already started.

post #3 of 9
I always repeat always freeze my cakes while still a tad bit warm here's a whole thread about how freezing cakes ROCKS

cakecentral.com/t/687120/im-convinced-freezing-cakes-rocks/15

It makes your cakes moist.
post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BakingIrene View Post

Can you please explain why you would both freeze and thaw a cake half a day ahead of its being served?

 

It suffices to simply let the cake get completely to room temperature, (add jam or curd filling) and cover with whipped cream, and immediately place it into the fridge for overnight.  The whole cake should be in a box to prevent transfer of odours from other foods in the fridge.

 

Whipped cream is not like icing, it keeps the cake moist but it must be refrigerated at all times if possible. Crumb coating with whipped cream is a quick smear with a spatula, there is no chilling required  before the final coat. 

 

And please reconsider  freezing a warm cake...it is bad for the cake and bad for your freezer.  Letting the cake cool completely to room temperature is the best way to avoid blowouts when you would cover with fondant. When an unfrosted cake must be frozen for storage, it must be completely cooled before it can be wrapped.

 

If your sponge is too dry, you need to address issues like how you measure flour and how long you cook...a simple sandwich cake should never need the contortions that you have already started.

The reason I wished to freeze and thaw my cake half a day ahead is because I wanted to try the freezing method and see what the results are. There are many baker's that recommend freezing the cake when slightly warm. I know it increases the temperature of the freezer which results in increasing the chances of the other items in the fridge defrosting. However, that's not a concern if it's an empty fridge. Also, I found chilling the cake did make a big difference to how smoothly the Whipped cream applied onto the cake and that was what I was hoping for so it worked for me. 

post #5 of 9

I never freeze slightly warm.  I wrap it slightly warm, then freeze. 

 

To thaw, just take the cake out and leave it on the counter for a couple of hours.  Leave the wrapper on so the condensation develops on the wrapper.  It really doesn't take long to thaw out.  I never fill and ice frozen cakes.  I don't use fresh whipped cream, but air bubbles happen in buttercream when you ice them cold or frozen and expose them to a warmer (room temperature) environment.  Since you're using fresh whipped cream, it might get watery and break down as the cake thaws out.  You will just have to try it and see.

post #6 of 9

Freezing warm cake is fine. Freezing seems to make my cakes more dense, which might be a problem for a sponge cake - you'll have to decide whether you think it does. I think two layers of wrap plus foil is a bit of overkill. I use one layer of wrap, which works fine for me.

 

Cakes takes hardly any time at all to defrost, so you don't have to wait for ages. My really dense cakes only take about half an hour or so to thaw, so by the time you cut and fill etc, I suspect your cake will be pretty thawed out anyway.

post #7 of 9
I've read all the threads attached to this post and want to say two things I've learned over time. I know for sure that wrapping my cakes while still slightly warm and freezing them immediately after does in fact make for a very moist cake. The reason I do this is because I like to split up the decorating and bake time and have cakes baked during the week. Frozen cakes are easier to handle when stacking as well, they thaw quickly. Also, putting a final coat of icing on a slightly frozen dirty iced cake is by far the easiest way to achieve a smooth finish. A tip my mom taught me that I'll pass on...get a large cup of super hot water, dip the spatchula in and swipe off water with a towel, then work quickly to turn and smooth cake...dipping in water as needed.
post #8 of 9

I guess I should clarify why I don't freeze them warm.  It's because I have a tiny freezer and it's packed with all my other food.  I'm not putting a warm cake in there with everything else.  I have a lot of expensive food in my freezer and it's just not happening.  I wrap it when it's warm and then when it cools I put it in the freezer.  In my opinion the temperature of the cake is not really important when it goes in the freezer, as far as improving texture goes.  For many recipes (not all), freezing does improve the texture if they are wrapped properly.

post #9 of 9

To apply a smooth coat of whipped cream, it is first of all necessary to NOT over-whip the cream.  It should be on the soft side.

 

Next it is necessary to apply a full centimetre (3/8 inch) thickness, then you can take off to a smooth coat. A turntable greatly helps with round cakes.

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