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Hi ratio shortening - Zero trans fat

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I have read the other threads.  I don't use trans fat in my shortening, using the crisco  I know- yuck. I do half crisco and half butter when I make this type of BC using the Wilton recipe.  I would like to try the CK zero trans fat hi ratio shortening- figuring it must be better and less greasy then crisco.  Has anyone used this?  

I did just make TCB lemon buttercream - wow what a difference.  But my flowers, piping and some basic recipes, I may be using the shortening so would like to know if this is a good idea.  The hi ratio with trans fat is not an option. Enough trans fat out there, so if I have a choice not to use it, this would be it.

Thanks for the help.

post #2 of 11

All Crisco has trans fat, by the way. Even if it's labeled "trans fat free".  That just means under a percentage PER SERVING. 

If it's hydrogenated oil, which solid crisco is, or any high-ratio shortening as well, then it's a tub o' trans fats.

 

I prefer to call it "motor oil by-product sludge".

 

Because I consider it just that appetizing. :)

I homeschool because I don't believe in the mass production of human beings.
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I homeschool because I don't believe in the mass production of human beings.
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post #3 of 11
If high ratio shortening zero has tras fat in it its minimal
I use the high ratio shortening with trans fat in it
regardless what one you use high ratio shortening is way better than crisco. And butter has trans fat in it, so one could argue against using butter. Anyways high ratio shortening has addtives in it that make the shortening behave differently than normal shortening , it holds more water and sugar and leaves a less greasy taste and feeling in your mouth. High ratio shortening makes for a good base to a yummy buttercream.

www.littleladycakes.com/2009/04/high-ratio-shortening.html?m=1

Now upon reading this link high ratio shortening zero would be a bit different because it has minimal fat in it.
post #4 of 11
We use Sweetex Z, it is high ratio shortening with <0.5g of trans fat per serving (low enough to be called "zero" trans fat). It results in a higher quality product than using Crisco, the biggest downside versus regular high ratio shortening is that the Sweetex Z is more temperature-sensitive.
post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 

Yes, thank you.  I know that all of the products out there that say "Zero " trans fat, and most other Zero's aren't actually zero.  

I prefer to use as little as possible when I have the choice, so I am interested in this product as opposed to the 3.5 gms trans fat per serving of the regular.  If it is no good, then that's what I wanted to find out. My TCB lemon buttercream I just made and put on cake was very soft. I prefer more structure for decorating.

Any one have experience with this "zero" trans fat Hi ratio shortening to share?

post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thank you. Sounds like no one has used it. I'll give it a try and post my results in case anyone else wants to.

post #7 of 11
It's likely that the CK zero trans fat high ratio shortening is just repackaged Sweetex Z.
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by kazita View Post

And butter has trans fat in it, so one could argue against using butter.

I don't know what butter you are using, but real butter does NOT have trans fats. It has *saturated* fats, which are common in nature and are not the boogeyman the margarine industry has made them out to be,but saturated fats are not the same thing as trans fats.
Trans fats are created from manmade chemicals,not in anything that is a real food.
I homeschool because I don't believe in the mass production of human beings.
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I homeschool because I don't believe in the mass production of human beings.
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post #9 of 11
Real butter does contain a small amount of naturally occurring trans fat, enough to force some food manufacturers to swap it out for alternative products.

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/07/dining/07tran.html?_r=0
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft View Post

Real butter does contain a small amount of naturally occurring trans fat, enough to force some food manufacturers to swap it out for alternative products.

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/07/dining/07tran.html?_r=0

Thank you.
post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 

agree.

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