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Silly question about something I should know already - Page 2

post #16 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by anneuk View Post
I do use dowels but usually to secure the cakes together so they don;t slide. Now If i am right this wont stop them squishing the cakes below so I should be boarding between the layers?

You should use a support system for every 4" of cake height, so if it's an average height single tier it's not necessary unless you're referring to multiple tiers.

 

Dummies can be coated with shortening or sprayed with water before applying fondant.

post #17 of 28
I've read on here where you still put buttercream on the cake dummy so that the fondant has something to stick to. I have also read where some people sand the edges just alittle bit because there so sharp that they make the fondant tear.
post #18 of 28
You can use royal icing,piping gel or buttercream to cover your dummy. But be careful of the sharp edges around the dummy it could cut the fondant- sanding it down slightly will help with this. Good luck and let us know how you do!!
post #19 of 28

I'll be at ExCel on Saturday! icon_biggrin.gif icon_biggrin.gif icon_biggrin.gif

 

If using a dummy tier, there's no need to buttercream.  Lots of people just wet them all over to get the sugarpaste to stick.  My personal preference is to use either piping gel or diluted liquid glucose.

 

If doing a really tall tier of cake, then depending on just how high it is, you'll need to put a board inbetween at either half way or two boards, each one a third of the way and then put dowels underneath, just like you would a normal tiered cake (only, in this case, the tiers are the same diameter, if you see what I mean?)

 

I always marzipan my cakes - even sponge cakes...  it gives a nice smooth finish.

 

M&B do do nice colours, but not the best to work with.  I use Regalice (or Renshaws Professional, as they've just re-branded it!!)
 

Inside this fat body, there's a thin woman screaming to get out...... but I can usually shut her up with chocolate!
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Inside this fat body, there's a thin woman screaming to get out...... but I can usually shut her up with chocolate!
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post #20 of 28
Thread Starter 

my local shop sells dummy's which have slightly cured edges so no need to sand....

 

so...

 

I am going to follow all advice on my next project come Sunday...

 

I am going to make a two tier cake as a practice for my sons birthday cake....

 

so following the link in a post above I will do the squish the cake thing after torting.....  now if I do a 6" and 9" round  cake of 3" high each tier... how many dowels will I need?

 

I am not going to marzipan under the fondant but I will crumb coat then butter cream a full layer before fondant and with the filling I will make sure that i place it well inside the edges of the cake so that it doesn't spill out as advised in the thread linked to in a post above :)

 

Hopefully I will get a beautiful finish that will restore my confidence lol OR I will practice more and end up getting it right eventually!

post #21 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Relznik View Post

I'll be at ExCel on Saturday! icon_biggrin.gif icon_biggrin.gif icon_biggrin.gif

 

If using a dummy tier, there's no need to buttercream.  Lots of people just wet them all over to get the sugarpaste to stick.  My personal preference is to use either piping gel or diluted liquid glucose.

 

If doing a really tall tier of cake, then depending on just how high it is, you'll need to put a board inbetween at either half way or two boards, each one a third of the way and then put dowels underneath, just like you would a normal tiered cake (only, in this case, the tiers are the same diameter, if you see what I mean?)

 

I always marzipan my cakes - even sponge cakes...  it gives a nice smooth finish.

 

M&B do do nice colours, but not the best to work with.  I use Regalice (or Renshaws Professional, as they've just re-branded it!!)
 

oops posted before i saw your reply!

 

Are you on any classes at Excel... I only just decided to go with my friend so they all sold out but I am sure it will be a great day.... I am looking forward to speaking to the sugar veil folk as I still haven't had any sucess with it after months of trying lol

post #22 of 28
If you are covering with a full thickness of bettercream, make sure to chill it real hard before you cover with fondant, or it is just going to squish out the bottom, and be a complete mess. You may know this, it just wasn't in your post where you said what you were going to do icon_wink.gif
Beginners, be sure to parrot advice and get your post count up as fast as you can. After all, it's not what you know, it's what people THINK you know.
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Beginners, be sure to parrot advice and get your post count up as fast as you can. After all, it's not what you know, it's what people THINK you know.
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post #23 of 28
Thread Starter 

yes in the thread link above leah i think it is says to pop it in the freezer till really hard but not frozen?  I am hoping it wont squish when it comes back to room temp lol

post #24 of 28
As long as it has settled properly, it won't squish, but it is very important to use a cake board in there somewhere. If it is a 6" cake, some people put it at the 4" level and then put 2" on top of that, others do 3" and 3" with the board between.
Beginners, be sure to parrot advice and get your post count up as fast as you can. After all, it's not what you know, it's what people THINK you know.
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Beginners, be sure to parrot advice and get your post count up as fast as you can. After all, it's not what you know, it's what people THINK you know.
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post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by anneuk View Post

Thanks for some good advice... is Viva like a smooth towel?? not sure what an equivalant might be here in the uk.. all of ours are like dimpled??

 

I do use dowels but usually to secure the cakes together so they don;t slide. Now If i am right this wont stop them squishing the cakes below so I should be boarding between the layers?  No that can't be right.. lol i am tying my brain in knots now.... if i were to buttercream and smooth it fully would I then chill over night before putting fondant on? Does this cause problems with grease or condensation anything?

 

LOL I have more questions than I had at the start lol

 

Yes, there should be boarding every four inches or so.  Do you have bulging where the layers are?  this would be caused by overfilling, not having a proper dam between layers, or the weight of upper layers impacting the lower layers.  If there is a discernible groove where your layers are, you haven't filled properly between layers or you haven't crumb coated thickly enough.

deborahanne

http://grandmasugarskitchen.blogspot.com/
http://fromlinetocolor.blogspot.ca/

Life begins at 325° F, and, yes, that IS powdered sugar in my hair.

Baby Shower
(6 photos)
Birthday Cakes
(6 photos)
Christmas
(6 photos)
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deborahanne

http://grandmasugarskitchen.blogspot.com/
http://fromlinetocolor.blogspot.ca/

Life begins at 325° F, and, yes, that IS powdered sugar in my hair.

Baby Shower
(6 photos)
Birthday Cakes
(6 photos)
Christmas
(6 photos)
Reply
post #26 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by anneuk View Post

 

Are you on any classes at Excel... I only just decided to go with my friend so they all sold out but I am sure it will be a great day.... I am looking forward to speaking to the sugar veil folk as I still haven't had any sucess with it after months of trying lol

Yes, I'm doing Paul Bradford's choc wrap cake demo. 

 

I've got some Sugarveil - but only the powder....  I would LOVE one of the mats, but simply cannot justify the cost! Around £50!

Inside this fat body, there's a thin woman screaming to get out...... but I can usually shut her up with chocolate!
Reply
Inside this fat body, there's a thin woman screaming to get out...... but I can usually shut her up with chocolate!
Reply
post #27 of 28
Viva is a smooth paper towel I have read on here of people using other paper towels but they leave little marks in the buttercream. You can use either parchment paper to smooth your cake or again I've read on here where you can use a piece of computer paper to smooth your cake.
post #28 of 28
When you are filling cakes, make sure you do a "dam" of very stiff buttercream around the edge of the layer and then fill with your buttercream. The dam keeps the buttercream from squishing out and bulging under the fondant.
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