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Someone talk to me about varying whipped ganache firmnesses :)

post #1 of 40
Thread Starter 

I want to fill my cake this week with whipped chocolate ganache.  I want it to be firm enough to support the cake once between the cake layers, but not so firm that it's too hard next the cake when eaten.  Do you know what I mean?

 

I'm sure you experts know the intricacies of the varying ratios of heavy cream to chocolate, as well as the different types of chocolate, that will help me determine what is best for my purposes!

Also, how far in advance can I make this? If I make the ganache and refrigerate for 2 days, and then whip when I'm ready to fill, will it be "too chilled" to whip?

 

Thanks :D

post #2 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by lrlt200

I want to fill my cake this week with whipped chocolate ganache.

What do you mean by *whipped* ganache?

Ganache is ganache..... not sure where you are getting the whipped bit from.....anyway,

 

 I want it to be firm enough to support the cake once between the cake layers, but not so firm that it's too hard next the cake when eaten.  

 

Do you know what I mean?

Sure do

 

I'm sure you experts know the intricacies of the varying ratios of heavy cream to chocolate, as well as the different types of chocolate, that will help me determine what is best for my purposes!

What BRAND of chocolate you use is up to you, what you can afford and what taste you like.

Ask 10 people what kind of chocolate they use and you will get 10 different answers.

Plus, it depends where you live and what is available.

 

If you are making Milk or Dark Chocolate Ganache use 1 part cream to 2 parts chocolate.

e.g.   for every 900ml of cream you use - use 1800 grams of chocolate

 

If you are making White chocolate Ganache use 1 part cream to 3 parts chocolate.

Also, how far in advance can I make this?

Three months in advance

Once made - allow to set overnight ON YOUR KITCHEN BENCH - then you can put it in an air tight container and pop it in your freezer....for up to three months.

 

 If I make the ganache and refrigerate for 2 days, and then whip when I'm ready to fill, will it be "too chilled" to whip?

YES - it will be rock hard and you wont be able to do anything with it ...except kill a low flying duck with it... lollllllll

Don't put it in the fridge....

Keep it on your kitchen bench.

 

When you want to use it - just zap it for 15 second intervals in your microwave - stirring well after each zap.

 

If you take it from the freezer....do so at night time

Place it on your kitchen bench

Go to bed

In the morning it will be back to room temp.

You may have to zap it again at 15 second intervals to get the consistency you require

Fill your cake

Allow to settle

Cover your cake in ganache..

 

Voula - GANACHED CAKE...

Nothing Whipped about it....  icon_smile.gif

We do not WHIP ganache - we stir it with a spatula...... repeat after me

 

WE DO NOT WHIP GANACHE - WE STIR IT WITH A SPATULAR

 

Because the last thing you want in ganache is air bubbles....

Whipping ganache will create air bubbles.

 

I am making this big print so as everyone who reads this post...will see it... icon_biggrin.gif

 

Bluehue

 

Thanks :D

post #3 of 40

You can find a good whipped ganache tutorial on Joe Pastry's site here: http://www.joepastry.com/2011/whipped-ganache/
 

I've used it before and it worked well.  You do have to be careful as he says not to over whip it and he includes a picture of what that looks like. 

 

Also, you probably don't want to refrigerate it because it will definitely firm up again as normal ganache does when refrigerated.  It should be fine kept at room temperature.

 

Hope that helps!

post #4 of 40
Thread Starter 
Bluehue, 
 
I understand how to make regular ganache, but whipped ganache can be used as a filling.   As for the types of chocolate, I don't mean brands, but the different % of cacao and how that affects your whipped ganache texture and firmness ;) I would imagine that using milk chocolate for ganache versus using darker chocolate with a higher cacao %--even with the same ratio of heavy cream to chocolate--would make very different ganaches (whipped or not).  At least, I think so! 

I LOL at your low flying duck example :D

 
post #5 of 40
Thread Starter 

I found these two links that I think helped me figure this out: http://thecookandthechemist.blogspot.com/2013/03/the-science-of-chocolate-ganache.html and http://chocolate.mit.edu/~chocolatiers/Wiki/index.php?title=Truffle_Making

 

I'm still not sure what is best for the whipped ganache I want, but I am guessing the best solution will be found by trial and error :) Anyone gone through this process and settled on the most ideal for whipped ganache filling that's not too soft and not too hard? :P

post #6 of 40

Bluehue, love, love, love your post (made my night!)

post #7 of 40

I make whipped ganache all the time, lol. The point is to get air into it, it changes the texture and you get the heavenly mousse like thick chocolate whipped cream.

 

A proper ganache is equal wet ounce cream to dry ounce chocolate, that's what I always use for darker chocolates, and I stack with it just fine. However, you can do more chocolate if you want it thicker, I would go for 2:1.

You can always add more chocolate if it doesn't set up firm enough, I would suggest doing a small batch to test, since different chocolates will set up differently.

post #8 of 40

I just used ganache on two mud cakes last week.  Used the same recipe for both cakes, but one I let set longer before whipping, and whipped it just a couple of minutes.  It had a softer consistency than the one I whipped as soon as it was cool (that one was whipped maybe 10 minutes).  So I can tell you than longer whipping results in a harder ganache, but not certain why.

 

Liz
 

Follow me on my Twitter handle: @Sugar_Iowa

Or on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SugarFineBakedGoodsAndConfections

Reply

Follow me on my Twitter handle: @Sugar_Iowa

Or on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SugarFineBakedGoodsAndConfections

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post #9 of 40
Thread Starter 

Thank you, scrumdiddlycakes and liz at sugar--those comments help my thoughts on this issue! I will be making ganaches tomorrow :) 

post #10 of 40

      lrlt2000 wrote

I would imagine that using milk chocolate for ganache versus using darker chocolate with a higher cacao %--even with the same ratio of heavy cream to chocolate--would make very different ganaches (whipped or not).  At least, I think so! 

NO

 

 


Quote:

Originally Posted by Claire138 View Post

Bluehue, love, love, love your post (made my night!)

LOLLLLLL - your most welcome...

 

Every week I see many posts about Ganache - what to do - how to do it - why did this happen - help........................... yadda yadda.

 

The OP posted about FILLING A CAKE....NOT FILLING CHOCOLATES....so that's why I wrote what I wrote.

Then blow me down, the OP comes back telling me *she knows*..................icon_confused.gif

 

My whole point being -

If you want to make a Ganache for cakes - you don't want air in it

If you want to make ganache for filling a chocolate - then you do want air in it.

 

Bluehue walks off to bang ones head against ones wall..................................*Bang - Bang - Bang*

 

Arghhhh.................... that's better...................icon_wink.gif   icon_lol.gif    icon_lol.gif   icon_lol.gif

 

Bluehue

post #11 of 40

I also whip ganache for a filling (bluehue, it is a lovely truffle like filling and a nice alternative for butter cakes that would normally get a buttercream or a mousse filling. Don't bang your head against a wall until you try it icon_smile.gif.  Not all ganaches must be thick and creamy. sometimes a little fluff is a nice change)

 

 

I often second guess myself when whipping ganache for a filling.  It seems much too light, but then firms up too much for the cake.  I have started to add a bit of butter to my ganache when whipping and it stays looser when chilled. 

post #12 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluehue View Post

 

 

My whole point being -

If you want to make a Ganache for cakes - you don't want air in it

If you want to make ganache for filling a chocolate - then you do want air in it.

 

Bluehue walks off to bang ones head against ones wall..................................*Bang - Bang - Bang*

 

Arghhhh.................... that's better...................icon_wink.gif   icon_lol.gif    icon_lol.gif   icon_lol.gif

 

Bluehue

There is a thing called "whipped ganache". It does indeed have lots of air in it - that's the whole point. You make ganache, let it set, and whip it to a mousse. It has nothing to do with not understanding ganache. Sometimes you do want that air.

Lambeth'ing the night away
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Lambeth'ing the night away
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post #13 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gefion View Post

There is a thing called "whipped ganache".

Yes, that's right .......but as I have said many a time before - why would one want whipped fluffy ganache in-between layers of a cake when the last thing one wants is air trapped in-between the layers....

One might as well just whip up a mousse.

The same as there is something called *ganache* with Butter and sugar and and and icon_confused.gificon_rolleyes.gif

 

Whipped ganache is nothing like Ganache.....

 

 

It does indeed have lots of air in it - that's the whole point.

Yes, again - that's right because if you whip anything - it will get air into it.

You make ganache, let it set, and whip it to a mousse.

Yes, this I know...... HOWEVER, when we fill our cakes and then cover them with Ganache - we don't want nor should there be - all that air....

FOR CAKING.

 

It has nothing to do with not understanding ganache.

Really ?

Well from 97% of the ganache threads I see and read on here it makes me think otherwise.

Sometimes you do want that air.

Yes, and sometimes you don't want nor need that air...

Perhaps people need to read what I am typing and realise that I am not talking about filling chocolates.... or filling pastry shells - or filling dessert glasses

We are using it to fill cakes and then cover those cakes.

 

Oh hang on - here's a thought -

Fill your cakes with Whipped fluffy moussey ganache - then squish the living daylights out of it so as to get rid of all the air.... yep, that's makes sense.

 

Honestly - its like flogging a dead horse....

 

Bluehue

 

 

 

post #14 of 40

I don't understand what this opposition to whipping ganache is all about! This is one happy Aussie ganache whipper here!

 

OP, I whip ganache for cupcake toppings AND for filling cake layers, its a beautiful, not gritty, smooth delicious and above all LIGHTER alternative to regular ganache.

 

I definitely add more chocolate to cream the lighter the chocolate. It also depends on your weather, the warmer your weather, the more choc to cream. Definitely do not over whip. If your ganache is not whipping nicely you can add some scalded cream.

 

I refrigerate white choc ganache because it can taste rancid/weird depending on the type of choc you use. And for any type, because with whipping you have added air to your ganache, keep your whipped ganache leftovers frozen/refrigerated as it WILL deteriorate faster.

 

 

Hope this helps!

Life's too short to make cake pops.
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Life's too short to make cake pops.
___________________________________
www.sweetperfection.com.au

www.sweetperfectioncakes.blogspot.com.au/
www.facebook.com/sweetperfectioncakes (come visit sometime!)

Reply
post #15 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evoir View Post

I don't understand what this opposition to whipping ganache is all about!

Put simply - whipped/whipping ganache is not ganache.

 

This is one happy Aussie ganache whipper here!

 

OP, I whip ganache for cupcake toppings AND for filling cake layers, its a beautiful, not gritty, smooth delicious and above all LIGHTER alternative to regular ganache.....and there it is right there.....alternative to REGULAR GANACHE....which is actually  *ganache*

 

I definitely add more chocolate to cream the lighter the chocolate. It also depends on your weather, the warmer your weather, the more choc to cream.

Why?

Definitely do not over whip. If your ganache is not whipping nicely you can add some scalded cream.

How can you over whip whipped ganache Evoir?

 

I refrigerate white choc ganache because it can taste rancid/weird depending on the type of choc you use. And for any type, because with whipping you have added air to your ganache, keep your whipped ganache leftovers frozen/refrigerated as it WILL deteriorate faster.

Now I have heard it all

If your cream is bought to the right temperature - how can it deteriorate faster...........................just asking

 

No wonder people get so utterly confused about ganache.

 

Hope this helps!

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