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Macarons stocking to paper - help please!!!

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

Hi, so i made my first batch of macarons today, they went well had the feet and all but arent easy to remove from the baking paper. So i put them in the freezer for a bit and now they are coming off with the paper stuck to the bottom. Im using just norman baking paper without the coating on it, shoul i be using another type of baking paper? Also they are really almondy and not smooth to taste. Should i be blending my almond meal for longer to make it smaller and smoother?

Kinda need to get this sorted as i have a friend wanting me to make her 50 for an engagement party!

post #2 of 19

When you remove baking tray from the oven - place it on a cooling rack.

The air will circulate and cool yor macarons down.

When completely cold they will come off the baking paper just as easily as they did after popping them in the freezer...

No, you don't need to add anything to the baking paper...

 

Did you pass your ground almonds through a fine sieve three times?

If not - do so next time - this will get rid of any tiny bits of hull and make sure that all your ground almond  is fine enough for a smooth batter.... and taste.

They are meant to taste almond(y).

 

 

Bluehue

post #3 of 19

Chuck your almond meal and icing sugar into a food processor and give them a whiz to make finer.  This will also make them easier to sieve.  I bake mine on a silpat and nothing sticks to those.

post #4 of 19
You can also put the baking paper upside down on the counter immediately when you take them out of the oven and brush the paper with cold water, and then let them cool. This makes them easier to remove

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post #5 of 19

Your almonds should be finely ground. I have a food processor that is just ok. But it still leaves little lumps so I sift it and re-grind the small bits in a coffee bean grinder I use only for macarons. 

 

As for your macarons sticking, you may not have cooked them long enough. they should pop off rather easily if you cooked them properly once they have cooled down like Bluehue said. I use parchment paper, but I know some use silicone mats like Silpat.

post #6 of 19

Sounds like they aren't actually done yet, I've used 'clumpier' nut flour before, (on purpose), and they didn't stick to the parchment.

post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the tips guys! Im determined not to let these little buggers get the best of me. Maybe i am taking them out too early.

I do put my almond meal and confectioners sugar in a food processor and blend for about 3-4 minutes and then sift. I dont only sift once so i will definately sift a few more times which should hopefully make them a lot smoother. My hubby liked the ones i did get off so thats start haha.

I have heard that i should put another tray under the tray they are piped onto aswell? So when i pull them out of the oven do i leave them on the tray then onto cooling rack or lift paper off and put the paper directly onto the cooling rack?

Thanks for your help!

post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pheoner View Post

Thanks for the tips guys! Im determined not to let these little buggers get the best of me. Maybe i am taking them out too early.

I do put my almond meal and confectioners sugar in a food processor and blend for about 3-4 minutes and then sift. I dont only sift once so i will definately sift a few more times which should hopefully make them a lot smoother. My hubby liked the ones i did get off so thats start haha.

I have heard that i should put another tray under the tray they are piped onto aswell? Yes, this helps if your baking trays are on the thin side....stops the *feet* from burning whilst the rest of the mnacaron is cooking...... So when i pull them out of the oven do i leave them on the tray then onto cooling rack yes, once out of the oven the baking tray will cool down quickly on the cold rack....honestly - once your macarons have cooled they will be easier to lift off the baking paper. Unless you are in a mad rush.... dont stress.....remember, perfection takes time lolllllllllllllll...no no, just joking...but dont rush any process when making baking or cooling.... then you will be happy with the end result...

 or lift paper off and put the paper directly onto the cooling rack?  no, more chance of the little darlings cracking or crumbling before completely set....and cold.

 

Bluehue

Thanks for your help!

post #9 of 19

If you do not have a convection oven (fan-blowing oven), then you have to do several things for your macs to turn out correctly and come off the silicone mat/parchment without browning too much. Such things include:

1. age your whites for 3 days at room temperature

2. use starch in your meringue

3. rest your piped batter until you cannot make an indentation

4. nest, or double up, your baking pans

5. preheat your oven with a baking stone (pizza stone)

6. keep your oven door cracked open just a bit as you bake your macs

post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by pquinene View Post

If you do not have a convection oven (fan-blowing oven), then you have to do several things for your macs to turn out correctly and come off the silicone mat/parchment without browning too much. Such things include:

1. age your whites for 3 days at room temperature

2. use starch in your meringue

3. rest your piped batter until you cannot make an indentation

4. nest, or double up, your baking pans

5. preheat your oven with a baking stone (pizza stone)

6. keep your oven door cracked open just a bit as you bake your macs

WHAT???   icon_surprised.gif icon_eek.gif

 

#1 doesn't determine if your shells come off the paper easily or not - this will determine you get the little feet - and that it will absorb into the almond meal

 

#2 doesn't determine if your shells come off the paper easily or not - NEVER have i done this - and no book i have ever read says to do that. Why would you want to add starch.... ewwwww, perish the thought.

 

#3 doesn't determine if your shells come off the paper easily or not - this is the resting period so as you get the *feet* -

 

#4 doesn't determine if your shells come off the paper easily or not - this prevents the bottom of your shell cooking to quickly and prevents any tinge of browning - thats all.

 

#5 doesn't determine if your shells come off the paper easily or not - NEVER read that anywhere - nor done it - nor know of any bakery that does it

 

#6 doesn't determine if your shells come off the paper easily or not - again, dont know of any bakery that does that - nor ever read a book to say do that.

 

No wonder so many people get scared or put off at the thought of baking the gorgeous little shells.....

Seriously - not sure if you have been on CC before or really are a Newbie, but eitherway.... none of what you wrote determines shells coming off the paper easily.

 

You make it sound as tho making and cooking these little babies is Rocket Science...where in actual fact, they are just another item one can bake at home in their oven and enjoy such little delights.

 

Common sense must prevail  if one is using baking paper......  then you allow your little shells to cool before lifting them offf.

If one is using the sil mat method - then of course they come off  easier

 

Me?

I wait the whole 2 minutes it takes for them to cool slightly and then lift them with a spatular............2 minutes isnt long out of one's lifetime - even if making 6 trays of them.............................................................................

 

 

Bluehue

post #11 of 19

I love all the 'macaron rules' you find online, lol.

They are actually very simple little cookies to make, but people have made the instructions so crazy complicated that people mess them up by trying all the 'tips' they find on pinterest.

 

I only let mine cool until I can take them off without burning my fingers, I single pan them, on parchment. I use both convect, and non convect, the only thing you have to do differently is adjust the temp by 25 degrees... and you won't find an egg white 'aging' anywhere near my kitchen!

 

The only reasons thy would stick to paper is if the recipe is flawed or if they are underdone.

post #12 of 19

Baking is science. Why do you think most professional recipes are written according to weight not volume? It boils down to the ratio of fat, starch, protein, acid, and base molecules. And if someone doesn't have a convection oven to quickly cook the entire batter at the same time, then there are several things that can be done.

 

While the question/problem was whether the macs come off easily, I stated that my suggestions would help them turn out correctly and come off without browning too much. It's easy to make pretty macs; macs that are filled with meringue are harder to come by. Ever notice most people post pictures of intact macs? How many actually take a pic of the insides?

 

Again, baking is science. My suggestions are based on science and experience. Crack open the books by Paula Figoni and Shirley Corriher...you'll discover plenty.

post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by pquinene View Post

If you do not have a convection oven (fan-blowing oven), then you have to do several things for your macs to turn out correctly and come off the silicone mat/parchment without browning too much. Such things include:

1. age your whites for 3 days at room temperature

2. use starch in your meringue

3. rest your piped batter until you cannot make an indentation

4. nest, or double up, your baking pans

5. preheat your oven with a baking stone (pizza stone)

6. keep your oven door cracked open just a bit as you bake your macs

I don't use starch in my meringue, nor do I preheat my oven with a baking stone. I don't even know what that is. I also don't leave my oven door open. I don't make them that often, but when I do they turn out well. I have pictures in my laptop of the innards of my macarons but I'm using my work computer at the moment.

 

Yes, there is a science to baking them but I don't think that it's so difficult to learn. There are so many tutorials, warnings, do's and don'ts that it can be overwhelming. The argument isn't about the ingredients used, or even if you should be weighing ingredients vs just using a measuring cup.  It's more about the technique that sets people up to fail.

 

I learned from Helene Dujardin and I think her method is pretty simple. 

post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by pquinene View Post

Baking is science. Why do you think most professional recipes are written according to weight not volume? It boils down to the ratio of fat, starch, protein, acid, and base molecules. And if someone doesn't have a convection oven to quickly cook the entire batter at the same time, then there are several things that can be done.

 

While the question/problem was whether the macs come off easily, I stated that my suggestions would help them turn out correctly and come off without browning too much. It's easy to make pretty macs; macs that are filled with meringue are harder to come by. Ever notice most people post pictures of intact macs? How many actually take a pic of the insides?

 

Again, baking is science. My suggestions are based on science and experience. Crack open the books by Paula Figoni and Shirley Corriher...you'll discover plenty.

 

I'm going to venture to say that there were no convection ovens in the 1500s when the macaron was invented.

deborahanne

http://grandmasugarskitchen.blogspot.com/
http://fromlinetocolor.blogspot.ca/

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deborahanne

http://grandmasugarskitchen.blogspot.com/
http://fromlinetocolor.blogspot.ca/

Life begins at 325° F, and, yes, that IS powdered sugar in my hair.

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post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by pquinene View Post

Baking is science.

Yes, i understand/know this

What i said was its not ROCKET science......meaning one doesnt have to have a degree in rocket science to prep, make and bake them.

 

 Why do you think most professional recipes are written according to weight not volume?

Yes, but there are recipes that are volume based......and one doesnt need to be profesional to use that kind of recipe.

Try an oldy but a goody.... Australian Scone recipe using just  an old teacup to measure all your ingerdiants in......

You will never et anything so warm, soft and mourish.

 

 It boils down to the ratio of fat, starch, protein, acid, and base molecules....see, here is another  example of rocket science...

No wonder so many people come on to CC asking everyday questions and having self doubt....because they are bombarded with  this kind of sentance.

No wonder the art of baking has gone out the window.... it should be enjoyable - it should be fun and should be easy.

Its Baking - not constructing the next rocket to head into space.

 

 

And if someone doesn't have a convection oven to quickly cook the entire batter at the same time, then there are several things that can be done.

Oh for goodness sake - now you are drawing a long bow...

Over 50 years ago i can clearly remember my GM baking little mac shells and her little oven back then was fueled by wood.

Please, this is where i return to my original saying of *making them doesnt need to be Rocket Science*

Her kitchen wasnt air-conditioned during the stinking hot summers but cooled by a tiny little fan.

 

 

While the question/problem was whether the macs come off easily, I stated that my suggestions would help them turn out correctly and come off without browning too much.

They ccme off easily when slightly cooled -

Any mac cookbook will tell you to allow them to cool slightly before removing from baking tray.

for a couple of reasons...

1 - because they are still softish nd you dont want to ruin the shape

2 - you dont want them to crack.

3 - you dont want to burn your fingers if not using a spatular.

Just the same as noone i know tries and gets a cake out of a cake tin AS SOON AS IT COMES OUT OF THE OVEN.

 

 

 

 It's easy to make pretty macs; macs that are filled with meringue are harder to come by.

WHAT???

I have no idea where you live - but i am having trouble following what you are on about.

There must be some rather shabby macs sold wherever it is that you live

 

Ever notice most people post pictures of intact macs? How many actually take a pic of the insides?

Bluehue throws her hand up admitting to this.

It would be like me posting a picture of a half ganached cake - who wants to see that - people want to see the end product.....

The see my creations in the raw so to speak when they come for a cake tasting......

 

Again, baking is science. yes....BUT not rocklet science.

My suggestions are based on science and experience.  i am happy for you.

Crack open the books by Paula Figoni and Shirley Corriher...you'll discover plenty. No i dont have to - i know how and do make gorgeous little macs....have for many a year - and whats amazing is that i have done so without all the rocket science.

 

Bluehue....

 

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