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Satin Ice Fondant is cracking - Page 3

post #31 of 47

good to know Alaska....I wasn't sure if it was only good for the specific bags sold for it. I was wondering how it would freezing cakes or cupcakes.g

 

JWinslow..Black Satin Ice is $9.99/2lbs now on GSA. Not sure about shipping

post #32 of 47

Chilled Cheese Cakes only, and no sucking.  Just slip them in the bag and seal.  Done  it several times.

~~We are living in a world today where lemonade is made from artificial flavors and furniture polish is made from real lemons. ~Alfred E. Newman  
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~~We are living in a world today where lemonade is made from artificial flavors and furniture polish is made from real lemons. ~Alfred E. Newman  
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post #33 of 47

Try to knead in a little bit of corn syrup into your fondant - it may help with pliability and will prevent it from drying.

post #34 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by JWinslow View Post


I thought it was just me.  I thought the Satin Ice seemed softer than what I remembered.  I'm going to be using it again this month (black).  Here's hoping this one comes out better than the last...

 

Good luck!
 
And to those of y'all paying so much for Satin Ice - consider getting  a tax exempt certificate and buy it from a regular supplier if there's one in your area. I pay about $65 for a 20 lb bucket, which is $3.25 per lb.
post #35 of 47

Rude is defined as:  Offensively impolite or ill-mannered.

 

It is not a blanket word to call someone just because.    

 

Move on please or the thread gets locked/deleted.

 

Comments I find off topic are being deleted.

post #36 of 47
We've used Satin Ice for two cupcake orders now, and have not had a problem at all with it. When we open a new box, the leftover fondant we seal in a Ziploc bag, very tightly. (It also tastes better than the Wilton fondant!) Fortunately, our supplier is only about a mile from our house, which is very handy.
post #37 of 47

Update: It turned out my last 3 buckets of Satin Ice were a bad batch - I wonder if I'm going to be getting any money back on this. It was batch number 3062004, in case anyone out there had the same problem.

post #38 of 47

I had the exact same problem , i needed a bright orange color and i did not have time to knead it that deep, so i changed my regular brand and got a satin ice tub , was very happy with the results until in the morning the cake was all cracks although i kneaded it well . 

post #39 of 47
Wow
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s View Post

I've used Satin Ice for years, and just do not have all the problems that others report.
1.  You do have to knead it until it warms up and becomes elastic.  The kneading activates the gums in the product that make it elastic.  Probably 5 minutes of kneading.

2.  I always roll it out with the thinnest film of veg shortening smeared on the counter.  Haven't used a mat, just because I was taught to pick it up supported by my forearms and place it on the cake.

3.  Fondant goes on a cold cake better.

4.  The temp of your cake has nothing to do with making bubbles under the fondant.  

5.  Cakes don't make gas.

6.  There is, quite naturally, air inside you cake.  It may be between the filling and the cake layers (see thread on "My newest trick" to get air out of cakes and prevent bulging)  ;  it may be between the bc/ganache and fondant.  To allow it to escape, you *always* run a thin sharp knife edge along the bottom of the fondant and board.  Sealing up the cake too tightly by thoroughly pressing the fondant to the board traps the air underneath the fondant.  As it naturally tries to move out, you'll get a bubble.  If the tier is to be stacked, just poke a hole (skewer sized generally works) into the top.  This hole will be covered by the next tier.

7.  If you do get a bubble, insert the tiniest straw like thing you have into the bubble and suck the air out.  You are not putting your mouth on to the cake and you are not blowing onto it.  Suck the air out.  To repair the hole you just made, dissolve some of the fondant into water and make a thick, thick paste.  Using a light touch and a small spatula or knife edge, repair the hole with the paste.  

8.  To keep your fondant softer, after its applied, rub some veg shortening - a tiny bit - onto your hands and rub your hands lightly al over the cake.  It will be a bit shiny, but the fondant will stay a bit softer.  However, applying dusts will likely be streaky if you're applying them all over, and painting on the fondant will likely not be successful.  If you're just applying fondant decos, there's no problem.

9.  Fondant is *supposed* to get firm on the outside of the cake.,  Very firm.  Some people might call it hard.  It's what it's designed to do.  It seals the cake.  If you don't like the product, use bc.
!

Wow! Awesome tips, especially on how to deflate a bubble! I've never thought of that! 👍👏😘 thanks!
post #40 of 47

and it happend to me again with brown fondant from satin ice, by the time the cake was served it was cracked like craaaaaaaaaaazy :(

*

post #41 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Theodor View Post

and it happend to me again with brown fondant from satin ice, by the time the cake was served it was cracked like craaaaaaaaaaazy icon_sad.gif
*

OMG that cake is sooo good!!
post #42 of 47

Are you guys using the Satin Ice, or the Satin Ice Buttercream Fondant?  I use the Buttercream Fondant and don't seem to have the problems you're talking about here.  If I'm using fondant that is a bit older, meanig not bought the day before or the day of the cake covering, it can get a little dry, but it doesn't crack like you're talking about, especially if I knead it with a bit of shortening on my hands.  More times than not, it goes on the cake with no problem whatsoever.  I so far haven't covered a lot of cakes in fondant, but the ones I have, have been fine.  Maybe it's the consistency of the Buttercream Fondant over the regular fondant, I don't know.  I get the Buttercream one because it tastes a better than the regular one.  I have purchased the pre-colored Satin Ice (blue and red) and didn't have any cracking with those either.  But I do knead the dickens out of it!

post #43 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerle View Post

Are you guys using the Satin Ice, or the Satin Ice Buttercream Fondant?  I use the Buttercream Fondant and don't seem to have the problems you're talking about here.  If I'm using fondant that is a bit older, meanig not bought the day before or the day of the cake covering, it can get a little dry, but it doesn't crack like you're talking about, especially if I knead it with a bit of shortening on my hands.  More times than not, it goes on the cake with no problem whatsoever.  I so far haven't covered a lot of cakes in fondant, but the ones I have, have been fine.  Maybe it's the consistency of the Buttercream Fondant over the regular fondant, I don't know.  I get the Buttercream one because it tastes a better than the regular one.  I have purchased the pre-colored Satin Ice (blue and red) and didn't have any cracking with those either.  But I do knead the dickens out of it!


 




i used this product and i kneaded it sooooo long it was hard to knead but fine , ended up cracking, never satin ice again

http://www.goldaskitchen.com/merchant.ihtml?pid=13649&step=4
post #44 of 47

That's what I call the "regular" Satin Ice.  The kind I get definitely says "White/Buttercream" on the label.  And that is the problem with the buttercream one.....you can only get white, so you either color it or have to buy the "regular" Satin Ice to get colored.  I get it from a local cake supply store here in town.  I will admit....if I add gumpaste to the buttercream fondant, it will cause it to dry out more so than using the straight fondant, so I only use it for decorations, not for covering a cake.

post #45 of 47

I don't think I will ever use it to cover a cake again--it was awful. I didn't add gumpaste. I kneaded till my hands nearly fell off. When I used to use the Wilton fondant, this never happened but it was awful tasting. Any suggestions for a good tasting, reliable fondant that will cover cakes well?

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