Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Cake Disasters › Buttercream ruffles kept falling off ombre cake.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Buttercream ruffles kept falling off ombre cake. - Page 2

post #16 of 32
Relznik, just out of curiosity do people still get their wedding cakes slathered in royal icing over there? It's only 11 years since I had mine, but I don't recall any other option being offered!
elsewhere.
Reply
elsewhere.
Reply
post #17 of 32

Have you tried using hi-ratio shortening with your butter? I know many of my previous students that used Crisco, no butter, and not enough liquid had issues with falling decor. Keep trying and best! Ro

post #18 of 32

I agree with the others that said your buttercream was probably a little too dry.  Of course if it's too wet the ruffles can fall from being too heavy too, so it's another one of those things were the consistency has to be just right.  Also be sure you are keeping the wide part of the tip in contact with the cake as you pipe.

Jen
Reply
Jen
Reply
post #19 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by kblickster View Post

I really appreciate all of you taking the time to let me know what I am doing wrong.  I read and watch videos as much as possible but it seems I still miss things.  Everyone on this site is so helpful.  Thanks.

The videos never show you the very most important part of all. Ingredients carry a variable amount of water vapour.  You have to test and adjust each batch.

 

Put a little of the mixed icing onto a small plate and squish it between your bare fingers. Yes I am telling you to play with your food.

 

Then take a table knife, dip the tip into the bowl, and pull up to see what kind of peak your batch makes.  You have to match the feel and knife consistency to what you are planning to do. 

 

For a crumb coat, we old-school bakers dilute with water or milk to get the icing soft enough that it doesn't pull crumbs out. It sets pretty quick anyway because the bare cake helps.

 

For a final coat, we learned to make the icing soft enough that paper towels were not needed. A slow crust is handy for the piped decorations, but too much crusting makes the cake taste not as good.

 

For piping onto a crusted surface, the icing in the bag has to be extra sticky. We use corn syrup instead of water to thin down buttercream, because it mixes better and gives you a LOT more control in the bag.  If you are all out of corn syrup, piping gel or even liquid honey work the same way. How much is determined by the exact kind of piping that you plan to do.


Edited by BakingIrene - 2/1/13 at 9:48pm
post #20 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by kikiandkyle View Post

Relznik, just out of curiosity do people still get their wedding cakes slathered in royal icing over there? It's only 11 years since I had mine, but I don't recall any other option being offered!


Not really...  royal icing is also the exception, rather than the norm.

 

The skill of royal icing a cake (well!) was a bit of a dieing art, but from what I can gather, it is making a bit of a come-back.  But it's still definitely the exception rather than the norm.

 

The vast, vast, vast majority of cakes are covered in sugarpaste (fondant).  And no-one makes their own over here, either!! icon_wink.gif

 

Suzanne x

Inside this fat body, there's a thin woman screaming to get out...... but I can usually shut her up with chocolate!
Reply
Inside this fat body, there's a thin woman screaming to get out...... but I can usually shut her up with chocolate!
Reply
post #21 of 32
I just remember all the wedding and christening cakes we ate as children, with that rock hard icing on the outside! And all the marzipan...

I think the old school Lambeth style is coming back a little here too.
elsewhere.
Reply
elsewhere.
Reply
post #22 of 32

Thank you so much :) It took quite a long time and it's one of those cakes that you have to step away from to see it's beauty since you're sitting up close for so long! haha

post #23 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by BakingIrene View Post

The videos never show you the very most important part of all. Ingredients carry a variable amount of water vapour.  You have to test and adjust each batch.

 

Put a little of the mixed icing onto a small plate and squish it between your bare fingers. Yes I am telling you to play with your food.

 

Then take a table knife, dip the tip into the bowl, and pull up to see what kind of peak your batch makes.  You have to match the feel and knife consistency to what you are planning to do. 

 

For a crumb coat, we old-school bakers dilute with water or milk to get the icing soft enough that it doesn't pull crumbs out. It sets pretty quick anyway because the bare cake helps.

 

For a final coat, we learned to make the icing soft enough that paper towels were not needed. A slow crust is handy for the piped decorations, but too much crusting makes the cake taste not as good.

 

For piping onto a crusted surface, the icing in the bag has to be extra sticky. We use corn syrup instead of water to thin down buttercream, because it mixes better and gives you a LOT more control in the bag.  If you are all out of corn syrup, piping gel or even liquid honey work the same way. How much is determined by the exact kind of piping that you plan to do.

Wow!  Awesome info!  Thank you for sharing that with us.

post #24 of 32

You could always use a dummy cake under the ruffled part of the cake.  Easier to get a good 'glue' on dummy.  Either that, or ganache under fondant, then apply ruffles.  This will give you a firmer base to apply ruffles to.

post #25 of 32

@ Relznek----  How do you get your MMF so white?  Mine always has a hint of cream.  I have used Wilton's white white.  Is there another trick?

post #26 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by stampinron View Post

@ Relznek----  How do you get your MMF so white?  Mine always has a hint of cream.  I have used Wilton's white white.  Is there another trick?


I don't use MMF.

 

I'm in the UK and no-one makes their own fondant (or, sugarpaste, as we call it!) here!!

 

I buy a brand called Renshaw's Regal-ice.

Inside this fat body, there's a thin woman screaming to get out...... but I can usually shut her up with chocolate!
Reply
Inside this fat body, there's a thin woman screaming to get out...... but I can usually shut her up with chocolate!
Reply
post #27 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by SugaredSaffron View Post

It's a lovely cake! Sorry you had ruffle trouble.

Maybe its just the way you post BI, but you do come off as a bit aggressive when you post sometimes. Maybe its the CAPITALS that does it lol.

Are you like the last person to take emphasizing as screaming? LOL

“If I was made of cake I'd eat myself before somebody else could.”
Emma Donoghue

Reply

“If I was made of cake I'd eat myself before somebody else could.”
Emma Donoghue

Reply
post #28 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by BakingIrene View Post

The videos never show you the very most important part of all. Ingredients carry a variable amount of water vapour.  You have to test and adjust each batch.

 

Put a little of the mixed icing onto a small plate and squish it between your bare fingers. Yes I am telling you to play with your food.

 

Then take a table knife, dip the tip into the bowl, and pull up to see what kind of peak your batch makes.  You have to match the feel and knife consistency to what you are planning to do. 

 

For a crumb coat, we old-school bakers dilute with water or milk to get the icing soft enough that it doesn't pull crumbs out. It sets pretty quick anyway because the bare cake helps.

 

For a final coat, we learned to make the icing soft enough that paper towels were not needed. A slow crust is handy for the piped decorations, but too much crusting makes the cake taste not as good.

 

For piping onto a crusted surface, the icing in the bag has to be extra sticky. We use corn syrup instead of water to thin down buttercream, because it mixes better and gives you a LOT more control in the bag.  If you are all out of corn syrup, piping gel or even liquid honey work the same way. How much is determined by the exact kind of piping that you plan to do.

BakingIrene, as always, I very much appreciate your kindness and generosity in sharing your knowledge and experience here in the forum. I have learned so much from all of the valuable information you constantly impart to help those in need, so thank you.  By the way, you could type in all caps and it wouldn’t bother me the least.

post #29 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ducky316 View Post

Are you like the last person to take emphasizing as screaming? LOL

YES I MUST BE!!!
"Taste your words before you feed them to people."
www.sugaredsaffron.co.uk
www.facebook.com/SugaredSaffron
Reply
"Taste your words before you feed them to people."
www.sugaredsaffron.co.uk
www.facebook.com/SugaredSaffron
Reply
post #30 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by kblickster View Post

Ah, if only anyone liked fondant.  Someone could make a fortune if they could change that mindset.  Which MM fondant recipe do you use?  Are your customers happy with it?


"Make" people like it by educating them....I always tell my customers that, in the US, Wilton has given fondant a bad name.  Many years ago when Martha Stewart started to focus on fondant, it seems like everyone wanted it for the clean look, but no one liked the taste.  Of course, most were using Wilton because I think that's just what was available?  So I tell them that I use the same that Duff and Buddy have used, so can it really be that bad?  I have recently began using Fondx, but used to use Satin Ice.  They usually always agree that it's pretty good.  ANOTHER problem I think happens is that people don't roll it thin enough.  I am on a cake club on FB and one lady says she rolls hers no thinner than 1/4".....my thought?  Gross!!!  To each his own, I guess!

Aah, cake. . .the 5th food group!!
Reply
Aah, cake. . .the 5th food group!!
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cake Disasters
Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Cake Disasters › Buttercream ruffles kept falling off ombre cake.