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Pic of the cake - Page 2

post #16 of 29

Chris,

 

The sponge is a foam pad that you use for gumpaste and fondant.  The reason you use it is because it's a soft surface that "gives" when you push on it.  That's the kind of surface you need when you are using a ball tool on flower petals.  It makes the petals look more life-like and delicate.  You do this before you put the flowers on the cake.

 

http://www.globalsugarart.com/product.php?id=21195&name=Fondant%20Shaping%20Foam%20by%20Wilton&gdftrk=gdfV25706_a_7c2149_a_7c8856_a_7c21195&gclid=CJ2_rMTUg7UCFQWnnQoduUMAag

post #17 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnnieCahill View Post

Chris,

 

The sponge is a foam pad that you use for gumpaste and fondant.  The reason you use it is because it's a soft surface that "gives" when you push on it.  That's the kind of surface you need when you are using a ball tool on flower petals.  It makes the petals look more life-like and delicate.  You do this before you put the flowers on the cake.

 

http://www.globalsugarart.com/product.php?id=21195&name=Fondant%20Shaping%20Foam%20by%20Wilton&gdftrk=gdfV25706_a_7c2149_a_7c8856_a_7c21195&gclid=CJ2_rMTUg7UCFQWnnQoduUMAag


Ohh right icon_redface.gif thought you meant a sponge mix lol yes i have a mat, i did use it, was kind of scared to use it on the smaller flowers and daisies, esp the long think petalled flowers. xx

post #18 of 29

The cake looks great.  I actually like the design.  It's balanced with the right amount of white space.  Sorry, part of what I do for a living involves graphic design, so I am always aware of color and white space.

 

Your roses look really nice.  On your smaller flowers, next time you might want to try to roll your paste a little thinner.  It will just help them look a little more delicate.

 

Keep up the good work-this is a great start!

post #19 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnnieCahill View Post

The cake looks great.  I actually like the design.  It's balanced with the right amount of white space.  Sorry, part of what I do for a living involves graphic design, so I am always aware of color and white space.

 

Your roses look really nice.  On your smaller flowers, next time you might want to try to roll your paste a little thinner.  It will just help them look a little more delicate.

 

Keep up the good work-this is a great start!


Thank you Annie, i will try to make icing thinner on flowers next time, i did a few thin ones, but ripped the petals as i used the ball tool. do you use the small ball or large ball? I used the small ball? xxx

post #20 of 29

It could have been that your paste was too dry.  I am partial to the large ball (that sounds bad haha) but I have several that I use.  Maybe some of the other folks who are more experienced with sugar flowers can chime in.

post #21 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnnieCahill View Post

It could have been that your paste was too dry.  I am partial to the large ball (that sounds bad haha) but I have several that I use.  Maybe some of the other folks who are more experienced with sugar flowers can chime in.


Lol that does sound rather bad icon_biggrin.gif will give it a go with the large ball next time, xxx

post #22 of 29

Hmm. "Partial to the large ball." Why am I suddenly thinking of a certain infamous AC/DC song that I don't think I've ever actually heard (personally, my taste in rock bands runs more towards the Hampton String Quartet).

James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

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James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

Reply
post #23 of 29

The sponge is not a recipe... it is a form. You put the flower on it to finish your sculpture with the tools. The sponge gives, this alows more natural movement in the flower, to give a more realistic finished look. I am a hobbyist, so my tools are limited. I actually form my flowers in the palm of my left hand, using my right hand to guide the tool.

My first experience with fondant was lumpy, much, much worse than yours. I watched a video about how to smooth that buttercream with a viva papertowel and tool that looks like an iron. I make home-made buttercream and put each layer in the fridge for about 10 minutes so it crusts. Then I smooth it. Then I re-refrigerate while I prep the fondant. I freeze all my cakes, and carve them because I like crisp, straight edges.

Your finished look of placement is pretty, but to bring it to the next level, think about art and nature. Usually the top has smaller blossoms or buds. Floral sprays are rarely angular. They usually follow a "C" pattern or a "S" pattern, sometimes they are clustered. They tend to look best in odd numbers too. The top left gardenia - pull off some of the bottom petals, and close the blossom a little to make it smaller. Also consider closing some of the other three flowers, maybe make 1 look more like a bud. I have to give you kuddos though your blossoms are gorgeous. Tweek a few little things and your cakes will be magnificent! 

post #24 of 29

To put things in context - LOL - the ball tool comes with a large ball at one end and a smaller one at the other end. The suggestion about watching lots of videos is a very good one, and the list of sources posted by MaurorLess67 contains all my favorites. YouTube is also full of cake-decorating videos, illustrating every step of the process, from leveling and stacking to crumbcoating to covering with buttercream or fondant to decorating. There are some really good ones about how to make flowers and figures. And the best thing about the YouTube ones is that they're free. What I meant about lining your cakes up is to get them lined up as straight as possible after you stack them and then cut the excess off from around the edges before you put your crumb-coat (the thin coating of buttercream or ganache that you put under the final covering to hold all the loose crumbs in place and give your fondant - if that's what you're using - something to stick to) on the cake. And seriously, let us see how you do from time to time. This is such a fascinating adventure!

Marianna
"I know my own mind...and it's around here somewhere!"
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Marianna
"I know my own mind...and it's around here somewhere!"
Reply
post #25 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by colleenski View Post

The sponge is not a recipe... it is a form. You put the flower on it to finish your sculpture with the tools. The sponge gives, this alows more natural movement in the flower, to give a more realistic finished look. I am a hobbyist, so my tools are limited. I actually form my flowers in the palm of my left hand, using my right hand to guide the tool.

My first experience with fondant was lumpy, much, much worse than yours. I watched a video about how to smooth that buttercream with a viva papertowel and tool that looks like an iron. I make home-made buttercream and put each layer in the fridge for about 10 minutes so it crusts. Then I smooth it. Then I re-refrigerate while I prep the fondant. I freeze all my cakes, and carve them because I like crisp, straight edges.

Your finished look of placement is pretty, but to bring it to the next level, think about art and nature. Usually the top has smaller blossoms or buds. Floral sprays are rarely angular. They usually follow a "C" pattern or a "S" pattern, sometimes they are clustered. They tend to look best in odd numbers too. The top left gardenia - pull off some of the bottom petals, and close the blossom a little to make it smaller. Also consider closing some of the other three flowers, maybe make 1 look more like a bud. I have to give you kuddos though your blossoms are gorgeous. Tweek a few little things and your cakes will be magnificent! 


Thanks Colleenski you practiced in your hand? Yes i do have the spongey mat, i saw some cake pics where they did a few big flowers at the top corner and draping over the cake in middle,  and down over the side. More practising lots more lol. xxxx

post #26 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marianna46 View Post

To put things in context - LOL - the ball tool comes with a large ball at one end and a smaller one at the other end. The suggestion about watching lots of videos is a very good one, and the list of sources posted by MaurorLess67 contains all my favorites. YouTube is also full of cake-decorating videos, illustrating every step of the process, from leveling and stacking to crumbcoating to covering with buttercream or fondant to decorating. There are some really good ones about how to make flowers and figures. And the best thing about the YouTube ones is that they're free. What I meant about lining your cakes up is to get them lined up as straight as possible after you stack them and then cut the excess off from around the edges before you put your crumb-coat (the thin coating of buttercream or ganache that you put under the final covering to hold all the loose crumbs in place and give your fondant - if that's what you're using - something to stick to) on the cake. And seriously, let us see how you do from time to time. This is such a fascinating adventure!


Thank you, i cant think of anything else apart from cakes, love making the flowers and making the cakes, then giving them away lol. Will look on you tube and watch carefully with the ball tool as i never use the  large one icon_smile.gif xxx

post #27 of 29

James-Ha!!!!

post #28 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by hbquikcomjamesl View Post

Hmm. "Partial to the large ball." Why am I suddenly thinking of a certain infamous AC/DC song that I don't think I've ever actually heard (personally, my taste in rock bands runs more towards the Hampton String Quartet).

Great! I hate AC/DC and the subject of the song makes me snicker, BUT I've got that song in my head now...

Beginners, be sure to parrot advice and get your post count up as fast as you can. After all, it's not what you know, it's what people THINK you know.
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Beginners, be sure to parrot advice and get your post count up as fast as you can. After all, it's not what you know, it's what people THINK you know.
Reply
post #29 of 29

you don't have to buy a new pan, you could also trim the edges , if you don't mind a slightly smaller cake. 

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