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freezing and thawing cakes

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

hello everyone! how do you thaw your frozen cakes?  how many weeks or months can those frozen cakes stay up in the freezer? thanks a lot!

post #2 of 6

You will get several answers here, take your pick.

 

When I had to bake cakes on a tight schedule, I would bake in the evening and mix the filling and base icing at the same time.  I let the cakes cool overnight at cool room temperature covered with a towel.  In the morning I would fill and crumb coat and put those cakes into a deep freezer (NOT a fridge freezer). 

 

Once frozen solid, wrap well with plastic wrap and put into an airtight container.  That cake will last a month. Thaw it by leaving the sealed container in the fridge overnight.

 

The specific point about a deep freezer is that it will not dry out the cakes.  Fridge freezers self-defrost and blow their cold air into the fridge,  which means they will dry out cake stored for more than a week.

post #3 of 6

Good advice ^.  Self defrosting freezers are awful.  Their constant temp cycling to maintain no frost means that all your frozen products are also temp cycling.  Get an old fashioned (usually cheap) non-self defrosting freezer, either chest type or tall just for your cakes if you have the volume to justify the expense.  I did a side by side test with some friends of my chocolate cake.  One freshly baked and iced, one pulled off the freezer shelf having lived there for 10 months.  Absolutely no difference between the two cakes.  Now, that's my chocolate cake and my freezer.

 

But truly, freezing for a week in most any freezer is not going to hurt your cake - IF it's properly wrapped.

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post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BakingIrene View Post

You will get several answers here, take your pick.

 

When I had to bake cakes on a tight schedule, I would bake in the evening and mix the filling and base icing at the same time.  I let the cakes cool overnight at cool room temperature covered with a towel.  In the morning I would fill and crumb coat and put those cakes into a deep freezer (NOT a fridge freezer). 

 

Once frozen solid, wrap well with plastic wrap and put into an airtight container.  That cake will last a month. Thaw it by leaving the sealed container in the fridge overnight.

 

The specific point about a deep freezer is that it will not dry out the cakes.  Fridge freezers self-defrost and blow their cold air into the fridge,  which means they will dry out cake stored for more than a week.

so, to thaw a frozen cake, im going to put the cake in a sealed container inside the fridge until it softens overnight? once a frozen cake is thawed, how will i store it? how will i tell my clients regarding the storage of the cake? once thawed, how many days will it last? thanks!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s View Post

Good advice ^.  Self defrosting freezers are awful.  Their constant temp cycling to maintain no frost means that all your frozen products are also temp cycling.  Get an old fashioned (usually cheap) non-self defrosting freezer, either chest type or tall just for your cakes if you have the volume to justify the expense.  I did a side by side test with some friends of my chocolate cake.  One freshly baked and iced, one pulled off the freezer shelf having lived there for 10 months.  Absolutely no difference between the two cakes.  Now, that's my chocolate cake and my freezer.

 

But truly, freezing for a week in most any freezer is not going to hurt your cake - IF it's properly wrapped.

 really? that's great! i have never imagined a 10-month-old cake that tastes like a freshly baked cake! is it only the freezer that preserved the cake? or do you add  preservatives to it? how am i going to wrap the cake before freezing it? thanks!

post #5 of 6

DO NOT add any preservatives to cake that will be frozen.  Make sure it is baked well but not too long.  Cool it until you can wrap it comfortably, or cool it overnight and crumb coat before freezing.  The proper wrapping is all the preservative needed. If the cake is crumb coated, freeze it without any wrappings.

 

Please allow me to remind you that I use a deep freezer, not the small kind that sits above a fridge. There is no fan circulating air.

 

Wrap the  cake with 2 layers of food wrap as soon as it has frozen hard. Put the frozen cake into an airtight container.  Then it will be safe in the freezer for a month.

 

Put the frozen cake into the fridge while it is still inside that airtight container.  Thawing time depends on size.  I unwrap the plastic wrap from the chilled cake just before I add the final coat of buttercream.

 

The "fresh" clock starts from the date of thawing, the cake has exactly the same shelf life as a freshly baked cake.   

 

I do not discuss the matter of freezing with my customers at all.  I tell them that each cake is baked to THEIR order. I tell them that each order has its own schedule based on the size of the order, I say that I use a domestic oven.  Nobody has ever asked me.  People cannot tell when the freezing is done properly. 

 

I tell customers that I put buttercream flowers into the freezer, that is a necessary part of the assembly.  I tell them that royal icing decorations MUST be made ahead and allowed to dry properly.

post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 

ok. thanks a lot! that's A LOT of information for me. thank you so much for being so generous irene. God bless u moreicon_smile.gif

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