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tax deduction question

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

IS there a way to deduct ingredients that you dont use that have expired or went bad, such as old fondant and expired items that you throw out unused? If so, how do I show that on my tax forms and how does it get entered or how is it deductable I guess is what I am saying...

 

Also for orders that were cancelled after the cake was made, I had one of those this year? is there a way to deduct that as well?

 

Thanks!

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Yes I am legal. Now move on and bake..
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post #2 of 12

You don't say if you are filing a business return, or if you are declaring "self-employed" income on a personal tax return.  So the following may or may not be relevant.

 

Discarding expired perishable ingredients is a required part of foodservice.  You expect a small percentage (about 5%) of consumables to be discards, and they count as legitimate  business expenses. No need to itemize discards--just put all those purchase slips into the "expenses" column of your accounting.

 

Track discards for your own benefit to avoid the loss of profit.

 

If somebody cancelled a cake, you had no income other than a nonrefundable deposit.  If you made the cake and it cost more than the deposit, then you should be collecting a larger deposit.  If you are called in for an audit, you would have to explain a habitual overspending (many cancellations) but one cancellation is again the expenditure of supplies and time that doesn't have a corresponding income. 

 

Some people donate cancelled cakes to charitable organizations and ask for a receipt for the retail value to use as a  deduction from their personal tax return.

 

Believe me--even a formal audit by the IRS is not going to ask where each package of fondant went. Not unless you are showing a major loss (like over $10,000) for more than one year in a row past your startup year.


Edited by BakingIrene - 1/14/13 at 11:09am
post #3 of 12
The ingredients you purchase should be deducted when you purchase them, whether or not they were actually used is irrelevant (provided they were not used for personal use).
post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 

ok thank you for responding. So the answer is a big no.. lol, if you dont use your ingredients, its your loss.

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post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 

thanks guys! I appreciate your help and quick answer, o and yes it was pertaining to a business tax return.

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post #6 of 12
Actually the answer is yes, all ingredients used for your business are deductible, whether they were used for a completed order, used for a cancelled order, or thrown out. What you can't do is take another deduction if you throw them out since you should have already deducted them when you purchased them.
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by shannycakers View Post

ok thank you for responding. So the answer is a big no.. lol, if you dont use your ingredients, its your loss.

Mybe there is still some confusion...if you purchased 100 packages of fondant in 2012 then you show all 100 packages as "expenses" on your 2012 return. Even if some is left.

 

If you had fondant left from 2011, then you should have shown that as "expenses" in 2011, so you cannot show it again as "expenses" in 2012.  Some places allow you to file a retroactive "correction" to your 2011 tax return, but my tax accountant said it was a hellish part of her job. 

 

The simplest form of accounting is to claim the full amount spent on consumables in  each tax year so you do NOT lose (assuming you align tax year and calendar year, another simple model).  The date on the purchase slip is what any audit will look at.


Edited by BakingIrene - 1/14/13 at 11:34am
post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 

ok thank you, I totally understand now:) My husband thought because some buckets of fondant were too old to use and I threw them out that i should be able to deduct some additional loss even though we already claimed the bucket as an expense, lol. I told him no and he said post it on the forum, lol and ask. Thank you!!  He thought that.. that particular expense would be counted at a higher percentage rate of deductable i guess than the regular write off expense already counts as.

 

Thank you for your previous responses:)

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Yes I am legal. Now move on and bake..
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post #9 of 12
Yeah, the IRS tends to frown upon people taking deductions for greater than 100% of the value of the item being deducted. icon_wink.gif
post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 

bhahha, he probably didnt know that expense was 100%, we are still learning what is 100 percent and what is half etc.. our accountant takes care of it all for us, we just turn in our reciepts to her, we do use cake boss software but we are still learning all the ins and outs, since we only meet with her a few times a year, its hard to remember exactly what is what sometimes.  it seems like alot of stuff changes each year as far as percentage that gets deducted, all the categories..

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post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by shannycakers View Post

My husband thought because some buckets of fondant were too old to use and I threw them out that i should be able to deduct some additional loss even though we already claimed the bucket as an expense, lol. I told him no and he said post it on the forum, lol and ask. Thank you!!  He thought that.. that particular expense would be counted at a higher percentage rate of deductable i guess than the regular write off expense already counts as.

One further detail

 

Consumables are 100% deductible in the tax year of purchase. ALL food, plus cake boards, boxes, wrapping papers, whatever goes out the door with each cake. Cleaning supplies, etc.

 

Durable equipment gets a different rate of deductible year by year. This is because there is wear and tear on the equipment. Much like the replacement value of your car going down every year. "Depreciation".

 

Stuff like icing bags should count as "consumable" even if they are not sold as "disposables" because they wear out within one year of daily use. 

 

Is he keeping track properly?  Hey he started this, make sure he gets it RIGHT.


Edited by BakingIrene - 1/14/13 at 1:25pm
post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 

LOL, thank you bakingirene! Im going to make him read this post to be sure he is getting everything correct. I be he did not know all of that, he does put ingredients, paper products and office supplies in seperate areas, but I bet he did not realize it is all 100% deductable, so thank you!

Yes I am legal. Now move on and bake..
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Yes I am legal. Now move on and bake..
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