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How do you store your decorated dummies?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

I have one stored in a box right now but I don't want a bunch of boxed up dummies taking the little space I have. I'd imagine they would gather dust if I just placed them uncovered on a table but I'd much rather have them covered, just not in boxes. Any tips please?

post #2 of 9

Clear green or blue trash bags? (more light proof than clear uncoloured ones)

post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 

Great idea BakingIrene, I suppose I wouldn't tie them right? Something about fondant not liking airtight environments or does that only apply to fondant on real cake?

post #4 of 9

You would have to loosely knot them to keep bugs out.  Once bone dry, they will be OK with a firmer knot.

post #5 of 9

Hmm. Are they frosted with frosting, or with Hydrocal? (I'm being a little tongue-in-cheek, and a little serious: it seems to me that a dense, strong, gypsum plaster like Hydrocal [a traditional choice for model railroad scenery since the 1950s] would be a good choice for frosting something that's not edible to begin with.)

James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

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James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

Reply
post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 

They're going to be covered in fondant. I bet Hydrocal is many times more expensive than my humble home-made fondant and probably doesn't handle the same way. The dummies are mainly for practice with fondant work, and for mock-ups so using any other medium would defeat the purpose.

 

EDIT: Thanks BakingIrene!

post #7 of 9

Yes, if they're for fondant practice, frosting them with hydrocal would kind of defeat the purpose. On the other hand, if they were for window displays . . .

 

As far as what it costs, well, in 25 pound bags, it's about $2 a pound. But any decent hobby shop that specializes in model trains can supply it in smaller amounts, albeit with a bit of a markup. And it's strong. A couple of layers of hydrocal-soaked paper toweling will support your weight. I believe U.S. Gypsum originally developed it as a mold medium for lost wax investment casting.

James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

Reply

James H. H. Lampert
Professional Dilettante

Web site: http://www.hbquik.com/jamesl

Flickr "baked goods" set http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvZvdTh

Reply
post #8 of 9

Large plastic bags over the top.
 

"Taste your words before you feed them to people."
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"Taste your words before you feed them to people."
www.sugaredsaffron.co.uk
www.facebook.com/SugaredSaffron
Reply
post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hbquikcomjamesl View Post

Yes, if they're for fondant practice, frosting them with hydrocal would kind of defeat the purpose. On the other hand, if they were for window displays . . .

 

As far as what it costs, well, in 25 pound bags, it's about $2 a pound. But any decent hobby shop that specializes in model trains can supply it in smaller amounts, albeit with a bit of a markup. And it's strong. A couple of layers of hydrocal-soaked paper toweling will support your weight. I believe U.S. Gypsum originally developed it as a mold medium for lost wax investment casting.

I'll have to remember that for when I have my shop. Thank you!

Quote:
Originally Posted by SugaredSaffron View Post

Large plastic bags over the top.
 

Thank you!

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