Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Recipes › please please pretty please help me figure out this frosting
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

please please pretty please help me figure out this frosting

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
[img][img]I have been trying to figure out this recipe forever! its a supermarket birthday cake made by dutch bakery in MA. The ingrediants are shortening, fondant (cane syrup, corn syrup), egg whites to stabalize it in the summer to stop the cake from melting (I emailed them and asked).
It looks just like the image attahced.
It is not buttercream and has no butter taste, it is not the frosting where you whip egg whites over a double broiler because it is not soft and tastes nothing like a marshmallow.
It also has a decorative flower that is hard but melts in your mouth.
The cake itself is also good. Its very moist but stale when fresh out of the fridge
What could it be? I've been trying with no success for the past year!
LL
post #2 of 16
As a matter of fact YES that is a buttercream.

Joseph Amendola bakers buttercream

1 lb shortening creamed with

3 lb fondant

egg white to adjust consistency.
post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
what kind of fondant? how do I make it? I've seen recipes for pourable and those that you can knead.
post #4 of 16
You need a poured fondant icing. If you do a Google search for "poured fondant icing recipe" you will get a ton of results.
post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnnieCahill

You need a poured fondant icing. If you do a Google search for "poured fondant icing recipe" you will get a ton of results.



Do I immediately add the shortening or wait a day and then whip it in?
Any idea on how to make the hard rose?
post #6 of 16
You should use the fondant at room temperature. If it's too hot it will melt the shortening. For the "hard" rose, could you give more detail? Could it be royal icing?
post #7 of 16
Well, it sure sounds like some kind of icing/frosting, but absolutely NOT buttercream, since it doesn't contain any butter.

I wonder if they use prepared pouring fondant or fondant powder? Hmmm. Not curious enough to actually try non-butter icing, but I wonder. I'll bet they use a prepared pouring fondant, otherwise it wwould be very dry.

Oops - I think I was musing aloud.....
post #8 of 16
Fondant? really?
post #9 of 16
Yes, fondant, really.

POURED fondant, not ROLLED fondant. Huge difference.
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by anavillatoro1

Fondant? really?



YES the kind that is cooked from sugar and water and glucose, and finely crystallized. Final composition 90% sugars and 10%^ water.

The sugar crystals are very fine in this stock item found in many bakeries. This cooked fondant is packed in 50lb pails for commercial use. It is warmed and poured over buns, doughnuts, petits fours and eclairs.

You can use powdered sugar, glucose and water: about 2.4 pounds powdered sugar, 0.3 pounds each glucose and water. Mix well--no need to cook. This will be stiff. Cream into 1lb white shortening.

The "hard" icing flowers are probably air-dried buttercream made with the shortening and fondant and NO egg white.

40 years ago this was SOP for many commercial bakeries across North America.
post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 
[quote="BakingIrene"]
Quote:
Originally Posted by anavillatoro1

Fondant? really?



YES the kind that is cooked from sugar and water and glucose, and finely crystallized. Final composition 90% sugars and 10%^ water.

The sugar crystals are very fine in this stock item found in many bakeries. This cooked fondant is packed in 50lb pails for commercial use. It is warmed and poured over buns, doughnuts, petits fours and eclairs.

You can use powdered sugar, glucose and water: about 2.4 pounds powdered sugar, 0.3 pounds each glucose and water. Mix well--no need to cook. This will be stiff. Cream into 1lb white shortening.

The "hard" icing flowers are probably air-dried buttercream made with the shortening and fondant and NO egg white.

40 years ago this was SOP for many commercial bakeries across North America.[/quote[img]][/img]

I thought the cane syrup was made from granulated sugar and water? I found the bakers manual by amendola and the decoraters buttercream is made from shortening and sugar and some water. I've attached a pic, I didnt see any recipe mixing fondant.
The rose seems like dried up royal frosting but i'm not sure[img][/img]
LL
post #12 of 16
ak,

If you don't think it's poured fondant mixed with shortening, do you think it's possible they are using some kind of mix that they finish in the bakery? I know a lot of bakeries purchase their icing that they whip in the bakery.

If you are going to go the poured fondant route, I know there is a recipe in the Amy's Bread cookbook which uses poured fondant whipped with butter and confectioner's sugar to make the buttercream, just in case you wanted a richer flavor. I think Irene gave you good info with the Amendola recipe, and I would actually start there to replicate that taste.

Also, I think it's a good possibility that the hard roses are royal icing or the decorator's buttercream roses which have been dried. Royal icing is basically egg whites and confectioner's sugar so that makes sense based on your ingredient list.

As an aside, there is other fondant besides the stuff you roll out and put onto cakes. There is poured fondant, and you may also sometimes see references to fondant cream which is generally used in a confectionery capacity (to fill chocolates and such). Just putting that out there as a general FYI for people who don't know.
post #13 of 16
ak,

Here is an easy poured fondant recipe:

http://www.joepastry.com/2008/making_ze_poured_fondant/
post #14 of 16
It's what's in the middle of a Cadbury egg...or a variation of.
post #15 of 16
Cooked fondant is prepared from cane sugar, water, glucose

Quick fondant is prepared from powdered sugar, water, glucose or corn syrup

I have made these both as well as the icing using fondant creamed into fat.

Sorry that people who sit and read things online seem to know better than those of us who used a 1972 bakery reference manual to bake goods.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Recipes
Cake Central › Cake Forums › Cake Talk › Recipes › please please pretty please help me figure out this frosting