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Would you do this?

post #1 of 47
Thread Starter 
I'm a bit frustrated... just got an email from a guy trying to order a pie. I usually make cookies or cakes, not pies. I have made a pumpkin pie for him before, just as a one off, because he asked me, and I thought 'why not'. The pumpkin pie was a success, but I wasn't so happy with him telling me which recipe to use, how to do the crust, that I had to use more butter and sugar etc. Basically giving me all these instructions. So, wasn't planning on doing that again.

But, now he's emailing me again for an APPLE pie this time. Again, with recipe and his instructions (raisins not sultanas, free range eggs, brown sweet crust). I don't mind making pies once in a while but I don't like people giving me instructions. If he wants to order with me he should just accept what I make. Don't you agree? It just annoys me that he expects me to follow HIS rules. I just want to politely turn him down, I find his email almost funny. What do you think, would you make a pie for this guy? He even send me a whole list with tips for pie making icon_smile.gif His email:

****

Hi xx, I hope youre well. How much would you charge to make this cake? (I like the pastry done until brown, and slightly sweet).

Ingredients
1/2 cup packed dark brown sugar
1/2 cup white sugar
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon lemon juice
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
7 1/2 cups peeled, cored and sliced Granny Smith (green) apples
1 cup raisins (not sultanas)
1 recipe pastry for a classic American 9 inch double crust pie: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/emer index.html
1 egg (please dont use cage hen eggs free range only thanks! Thats because, aside from being unhealthy, I dont want to support that cruel industry.)

Directions
1. Preheat oven 425 degrees F (220 degrees C). Spray deep dish pie plate with cooking spray
2. Combine white sugar, brown sugar, flour, lemon, cinnamon, and mix well. Add apples and raisins to sugar mixture; stir until fruit is well coated.
3. Spoon apple mixture into pie crust. Place second piecrust on top of filling, and trim edges. Lightly glaze top of pie with a beaten egg, then sprinkled with a little sugar, but only after pie is halfway cooked, so the moisture doesnt get sealed in the crust.
4. Bake till golden brown, about 35 to 40 minutes, or more. Place on a wire rack, and cool 30 minutes.

Tips on Making Fruit Pies and Pie Crust
1. Make the dough the day before and let it rest for 1 hour refrigerated after rolling and shaping to prevent distortion and for the best shape.
2. If making the pie to eat the day after baking, decrease the cornstarch by 1 teaspoon.
3. Use dark heavy metal, ceramic, or Pyrex pie plates for the crispest crust.
4. For the flakiest crust with the most attractive border, preheat the oven for at least 20 minutes before baking. For a crisp bottom crust, try baking directly on the floor of the oven for the first 30 minutes of baking, or on an oven stone set on the bottom rack.
5. The pie's juices must be bubbling thickly all over to ensure that all of the cornstarch can absorb liquid and thicken the filling.
6. Single-crust pies need to have the edges protected from over browning after the first 15 minutes of baking; double-crust pies, after 30 minutes.
7. If the top of the pie is browning too much, tent it with foil, but be sure to make a steam hole in the center for moisture to escape so the crust stays crisp.
8. Allow the pie to cool on a rack to room temperature, or until barely warm, before slicing to ensure that the filling is set and will not run. This will take between 2 to 4 hours, depending on the thickness of the pie.
9. If you spray the pie pan lightly with nonstick vegetable shortening before lining it with the pastry, or if you grease and flour it, it is usually possible to slide out and unmold the whole pie after it has cooled completely. This makes cutting it easier and is better for both the knife and the pie plate! Greasing and flouring also gives a pleasant, slightly rough texture to the bottom crust.
10. Do not glaze the top of a pie. Although it will make the pie look shiny and very appealing, it seals in moisture and keeps the dough from breathing. It makes a tough crust. A light dusting of sugar is the one exception.
11. Seal the bottom crust of the pie. Rose obliterates "soggy bottom" by brushing the bottom crust with egg white, sieved preserves for extra flavor, or melted chocolate for the most effective moisture-proofing of all.
12. For certain juicy pies (peach, nectarine-raspberry), bake the pie directly on the floor of the oven for a truly crispy bottom crust.
13. The food processor method for making pie crusts is the easiest. It is faster than mixing by hand, and because the dough is handled less, it keeps the ingredients more chilled.
14. In fruit pies, berries become bitter when cooked. The solution is to bind uncooked berries with a glaze or cook only 1/4 of the berries and the remainder uncooked.
15. Slice apples thinly for apple pie. Thick slices promote air space and create a gap between the fruit and the crust.
16. For the purest flavor in fruit pies, macerate (marinate) the fruit, capture the juices, and boil and reduce the liquid. The will decrease the amount of thickener and create more intense, focused flavor and a juicy filling.
17. One tablespoon of cider vinegar relaxes pie dough and makes it easier to roll. It will not diminish the crust's flakiness but will diminish shrinkage as it bakes.
18. Butter dulls the flavor of fruit (with the exception of apples). Leave all the butter in the crust when baking fruit pies.
post #2 of 47
I would accept the order. Of course once I costed out the ingredients and labor for the one-off recipe I'm guessing the price would be higher than the customer would be willing to pay (probably somewhere in the US$40-50 range).

Another option would be telling the customer that you don't accommodate special recipes, but you have your own excellent apple pie recipe (with free range eggs) that you can offer for $XX. Assuming you have such a recipe.
post #3 of 47
For something like this, I'd just go with what my gut says. If his proposition offends you then it's best to not take his order. 9 times of out of 10 when I bake something that's not part of my regular line it takes me longer (even though I've been a pro for 25* years). I have a higher risk of failure, I have more waste or additional ingredients to purchase that I might not use again, etc... so what happens is, they turn out less profitable not to mention the additional frustration which now effects all my other projects.

What I'd do is set a rediculously high price on doing this, then if he goes for it.........sure I'd bake it. That way, I know I'm getting compensated for the frustrations. If he doesn't go for the higher price, then he was a headache you just wisely avoided.
post #4 of 47
Personally, no, I wouldn't make the pie. Fact is, I wouldn't have made the first one, either.

I find that when clients get so wackily over-involved in recipes, details, etc., they just don't understand proper business boundaries--and I don't want to deal with the issues that can arise from that problem.

I would just give him a "thanks for thinking of me, but no (thanks) I'm not able/available/agreeable to make the pie". I might add that with such specific information, he might be able to do it himself or draft a friend/family member.


JMHO
Rae
I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
Reply
I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
Reply
post #5 of 47
My response would be along the lines of "dear sir the person who made that last pie was fired. I have taken over her business, and NO I do not bake pies."
post #6 of 47
If you're not in the pie business, then don't make the pie (unless you really want to, which it appears you don't). I get calls all the time wanting things I don't sell, and I made the same mistake as you and made a pie or cheesecake or two before I learned my lesson. Now I just tell people I don't make "whatevers" and if they say "Well you made one before" I tell them that I no longer make them so I can focus on my core business. And then try to sell them on something you do sell! icon_wink.gif
post #7 of 47
If he can be so specific about the ingredients and procedures, why can't he make it himself?
post #8 of 47
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jgifford

If he can be so specific about the ingredients and procedures, why can't he make it himself?



I have noooooo idea why... the first time I agreed to making a pie, and AFTER I agreed he sent me the recipe. So, I just did it as a favor. But I didn't expect him to come back to me with another pie, and another recipe. Who am I? His recipe testing lady?
post #9 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by jgifford

If he can be so specific about the ingredients and procedures, why can't he make it himself?


The recipe is probably copied from somewhere on the web. The tips were copied verbatim from here:
http://www.dianasdesserts.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/bakingtips.piesandtarts/PiesandTarts.cfm
post #10 of 47
Just say NO. Listen to your gut.

Seriously, learn from your mistake and tell him you are no longer making pies.
Tact is telling someone where to go so nicely they can't wait to take the trip!
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Tact is telling someone where to go so nicely they can't wait to take the trip!
Reply
post #11 of 47
Dude needs to get a wife...
post #12 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft

The tips were copied verbatim from here:
http://www.dianasdesserts.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/bakingtips.piesandtarts/PiesandTarts.cfm



Good Catch, Jason.

Ems81~~Why are you even asking? You didn't like it last time, you don't like it this time, it isn't part of your regular baking, and you obviously don't like the customer or his demands. Just.....say.....No.

By the way, your Dreamtime cake is absolutely STUNNING! Forget about pies! Just do more fabulous cakes!
post #13 of 47
Thread Starter 
Yeah, I know I'll say no, but just wanted to share... some people.... he seems to know it so well, why can't he do it himself? I guess he copied the tips because when I made the pumpkin pie he said I should have baked the crust separately (I baked crust and pie together and it was fine). Seriously, it's getting funny.
post #14 of 47
"Dude needs to get a wife..."

People like this don't have a wife because they are demanding and not compromising, and often verbally abusive. If he feels he can push around a baker he doesn't know, then he would for sure push around someone he does know. You should say no and so should a girlfriend.
post #15 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ems81

Yeah, I know I'll say no, but just wanted to share... some people.... he seems to know it so well, why can't he do it himself? I guess he copied the tips because when I made the pumpkin pie he said I should have baked the crust separately (I baked crust and pie together and it was fine). Seriously, it's getting funny.



I've been baking pies FOREVER and I've never seen a recipe that called for baking the pie and the crust separately unless it's just a shell. Obviously, he doesn't know what he's talking about and therefore, is never going to be satisfied with anything. Good riddance!
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