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Can this cake go in the freezer?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
So there's a wedding cake being made tomorrow and we were wondering if we can freeze it so that it will be ready for Saturday, the day of the wedding.
The only time she can make the cake is tomorrow.
It's going to be a two tier cake with fondant and lemon custard filling. The lemon custard will have whipping cream in it to make it... mousse-y.
Can we freeze this cake? Will it be okay on the wedding day?
If so, how do you freeze it and how do you thaw it?
post #2 of 10
I don't think the fondant will hold up after you take it out of the freezer. My understanding (although I have never done it myself) is that it will kind of glob off. I seen it recommended that you peel the fondant off before freezing and redecorating it later. icon_confused.gif
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaybay

I don't think the fondant will hold up after you take it out of the freezer. My understanding (although I have never done it myself) is that it will kind of glob off. I seen it recommended that you peel the fondant off before freezing and redecorating it later. icon_confused.gif



I did read on a lot of websites that you can freeze the fondant and it will be okay, however, we are sure about it.
post #4 of 10
You can freeze a fondant covered cake and not have the fondant "glob" off.

Complete cake. Box cake. Wrap box in 2 layers saran, 1 layer foil. Freeze.
24 hrs. before display, put wrapped box in fridge.
2-6 hrs. before display, place wrapped box on counter to come to room temp.
Unwrap box and display cake.

That said, I don't use dairy based fillings, so when I've done the freezing process, I have no issue.

I suggest taking 1/4 c. of the filling, freeze it & then defrost it to see if it separates or the consistency changes dramatically.

HTH
Rae
I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
Reply
I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
Reply
post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

You can freeze a fondant covered cake and not have the fondant "glob" off.

Complete cake. Box cake. Wrap box in 2 layers saran, 1 layer foil. Freeze.
24 hrs. before display, put wrapped box in fridge.
2-6 hrs. before display, place wrapped box on counter to come to room temp.
Unwrap box and display cake.

That said, I don't use dairy based fillings, so when I've done the freezing process, I have no issue.

I suggest taking 1/4 c. of the filling, freeze it & then defrost it to see if it separates or the consistency changes dramatically.

HTH
Rae



Thank you!
If we take the 1/4 c. filling and freeze it, how long should we have it frozen for? How would you suggest defrosting it?
post #6 of 10
Yes you can freeze it, it will still taste good enough. But when you know, you can see and taste the difference. The whipped cream in the mousse will deflate a little and can get separated (just slightly). The excess water will be absorbed by your cake. If you are an expert you can taste this. "Normal' icon_wink.gif people might not.

You can do Blakescakes test and make two batches, excactly same hight. One in the freezer for some hours, one in the frigde. Then thaw the freezer batch in the fridge for some more hours and see and taste the difference.
When you offer the frozen one to a person who doesn´t know, he will tell it tastes good. When you make him compare it with the unfrozen one he might tell the difference.

Freeze and thaw it like blakescake wrote, just don´t put it out of the freezer for more than 2 hours because of the whipped cream in the mousse (he is correct if it was a shelfstable filling)

Sorry for my spelling, but you might be familiar with a foreign (Dutch) background.. icon_wink.gif just a guess. icon_redface.gif
post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hieperdepiep

Yes you can freeze it, it will still taste good enough. But when you know, you can see and taste the difference. The whipped cream in the mousse will deflate a little and can get separated (just slightly). The excess water will be absorbed by your cake. If you are an expert you can taste this. "Normal' icon_wink.gif people might not.

You can do Blakescakes test and make two batches, excactly same hight. One in the freezer for some hours, one in the frigde. Then thaw the freezer batch in the fridge for some more hours and see and taste the difference.
When you offer the frozen one to a person who doesn´t know, he will tell it tastes good. When you make him compare it with the unfrozen one he might tell the difference.

Freeze and thaw it like blakescake wrote, just don´t put it out of the freezer for more than 2 hours because of the whipped cream in the mousse (he is correct if it was a shelfstable filling)

Sorry for my spelling, but you might be familiar with a foreign (Dutch) background.. icon_wink.gif just a guess. icon_redface.gif



What about Comstock lemon pie filling? Does that freeze well?
post #8 of 10
Yes, the issue with a dairy based filling is that the cake shouldn't sit at room temp for any real length of time (I copy and pasted my own instructions to clients who freeze MY cakes, so dairy isn't an issue).

I'd freeze the filling for at least 12 hrs. and then defrost in the fridge for about 6. Because I don't work with this type of filling much, I'm not sure if you can add a bit of gelatin to stabilize it more and thereby decrease the amount of separation, but it might help, too.

Rae
I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
Reply
I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
Reply
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pookie89


What about Comstock lemon pie filling? Does that freeze well?



I haven't frozen it, but given that you can buy frozen lemon meringue pies, I'd think that it would be OK. Again, it may weep a bit, too. Might want to test it, also.

I have left it at room temp and it's been fine.

Rae
I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
Reply
I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
Reply
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes

Yes, the issue with a dairy based filling is that the cake shouldn't sit at room temp for any real length of time (I copy and pasted my own instructions to clients who freeze MY cakes, so dairy isn't an issue).

I'd freeze the filling for at least 12 hrs. and then defrost in the fridge for about 6. Because I don't work with this type of filling much, I'm not sure if you can add a bit of gelatin to stabilize it more and thereby decrease the amount of separation, but it might help, too.

Rae



Okay, we will test it. Thank you so much. I'm not sure if there's anymore questions as of right now, but if so, I will definitely ask you, if that's okay
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