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Cake shops that dont offer fondant

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I went with a friend today to a cake shop in my area to see what they offer. My friend's daughter is getting married in Jan. So, we went to meet with a decorator at one of the best shops in our area. I was surprised when the decorator told my friend they do not do fondant. It made me wonder why? Why would a very popular cake shop choose NOT to offer fondant? Anyone have thoughts on that?
post #2 of 12
I don't do fondant except on fruitcake. HATE the taste of it.

I went to a lot of effort to test icing recipes that had lower sugar. People have been very happy.
post #3 of 12
Too time consuming and labor intensive.
HOW TO:
Make tip #127D (giant rose tip) Ruffle cake,
Write with icing,
Make buttercream roses on a stick:
http://s984.photobucket.com/albums/ae322/Unlimited1cakes/
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HOW TO:
Make tip #127D (giant rose tip) Ruffle cake,
Write with icing,
Make buttercream roses on a stick:
http://s984.photobucket.com/albums/ae322/Unlimited1cakes/
Reply
post #4 of 12
Lots of cake shops around here do not do fondant. I don't have a shop, and I don't get requests for fondant.
Maybe that's why the shop you visited is so popular?
Dora Moreno
If you work with your hands you're a laborer. If you work with your hands and your mind you're a craftsman. If you work with your hands, your mind and your heart, you're an artist
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Dora Moreno
If you work with your hands you're a laborer. If you work with your hands and your mind you're a craftsman. If you work with your hands, your mind and your heart, you're an artist
Reply
post #5 of 12
There are several bakeries in my area as well that do not offer fondant (which is super fine with me, I get more business for it) and most of them will say it is because of the taste. That may be true but at least some of them (the ones that I have seen their work and its not super great) its because they don't really know how to use it and may not want to hire a decorator that can. I will do what my customer wants though. I normally use marshmallow fondant but if they really don't want fondant I will use buttercream instead, its what the customer wants afterall that is important right?
post #6 of 12
Fondant isn't very popular in my neck of the woods. People who like the effect but hate the taste (my SIL, for example) will opt for rolled buttercream, and from what I've seen she has a lot of company.
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sherri2012

I like all the things I can accomplish with fondant. It is more suited to my style than buttercream. Just wonder if the successful businesses stay away from it, if I am barking up the wrong tree to go that direction?


It's possible to build a successful business focusing on just buttercream cakes, just fondant cakes, or a mix of both. It all depends on what you are comfortable with and what your local market demands.
post #8 of 12
There is a bakery where I am at that will, reluctantly, use fondant. The cost of the fondant work cakes usually keeps people from placing a fondant order. Mostly it is because of the time consumption involved with completing a fondant covered cake, especially if you don't do them that often. In the bakery, the overhead justifies avoiding fondant. It is too expensive to pay someone for the time that goes into one cake, when two or three buttercream cakes can be done in the same amount of time.

All that you see or seem, is but a dream within a dream... EAP

http://www.facebook.com/redlotuscakedesign


Http://www.redlotuscakes.com
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All that you see or seem, is but a dream within a dream... EAP

http://www.facebook.com/redlotuscakedesign


Http://www.redlotuscakes.com
Reply
post #9 of 12
I agree Sherri. I really prefer the look of fondant - especially for wedding cakes. Once people try my fondant (I use Jennifer Dontz' white chocolate fondant), a lot of people change their mind. Sometimes, I think it is more a texture thing than taste - there are a lot of great tasting fondants. Because I use the same amount of buttercream under that fondant as if it were a buttercream only cake, they can always peel it off.
Yes, fondant does add to the cost. But as far as time, I can roll out and apply fondant in about the same time as I can spend perfectly smoothing and applying Viva to a buttercream cake. (Can you tell I hate smoothing buttercream.) Yes, the buttercream needs to be pretty smooth before the fondant - but not quite as perfect as a buttercream only wedding cake. If I try to do a buttercream only cake, I invariably stick my finger in the side and have to start all over. Plus, I do a better job of stacking fondant cakes.
Love cakes!!
Valerie
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Love cakes!!
Valerie
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post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sherri2012

I went with a friend today to a cake shop in my area to see what they offer. My friend's daughter is getting married in Jan. So, we went to meet with a decorator at one of the best shops in our area. I was surprised when the decorator told my friend they do not do fondant. It made me wonder why? Why would a very popular cake shop choose NOT to offer fondant? Anyone have thoughts on that?



Your location may be a reason for not offering fondant cakes which often command a much higher price point. Your information says that you are in Wisconsin. Are you located in a large city? Or, are you located in a smaller, more rural area? I'm guessing there may be a reasonable population since you said there are multiple custom cake shops.

Your photos certainly show a wonderful skill level with fondant. However...how long do those detailed decorations take to "get just right"? If you are spending hours and hours on fondant figures, will a client in your area pay for that time? Will clients in your area pay an extra $1-$5 per serving for the time and ingredients needed for "TV" fondant cakes?

Here's a quote attributed to Ruth Rickey:
"When determining how far to take a design, think of the customer and ask yourself:
1. Will the customer notice?
2. If they notice, will they care?
3. If they care, will they pay?

Buttercream skills simply take practice. When you do something over and over and over and over, you WILL get it right. Skilled buttercream decorators can whip out a fabulous cake in 5 minutes.
Watch this awesome 4 minute video and you will see a man who thinks of PROFIT for this bakery. Watch him get these cakes decorated in record time.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r5YLPW5Bq9k
-------------
My biggest cake project so far was 4 different cakes for a 100th birthday party, 14", 12", 10", 8" The cakes were a gift of love from me to the birthday lady. I didn't charge for anything.

I am able to buy fondant at wholesale prices, but even with the wholesale prices ($27 for 10 pounds of white FondX), it would have cost me $55 MORE to make these same cakes. That's MY COST! Additionally, it would have taken me about 3-4 hours longer to cover all 4 cakes.
http://christinascakes.shutterfly.com/pictures/340

I did buttercream.
post #11 of 12
I looked at your pictures. There's absolutely nothing wrong with your ideas or your work.

If you ever want a part time job, you could ask a shop owner for an informational interview, during which you can actually ask them why they don't do fondant if they bring up the subject.

I can tell you in addition to the other reasons, that buttercream is food and has to be treated as such. Some of us got pretty well schooled in the very conservative rules. Buy (or see if you can borrow) Karen Krasne's new book on cakes to get some idea of how much you can do in that direction.

There is also the issue that a buttercream cake can be assembled within 2-4 hours for a rush order when decorations are available in stock. You would pitch your part time services to make gumpaste flowers and other toppers for such a bakery.
post #12 of 12
Cold porcelain is tricky. Is there a formula that is truly certified as non-toxic? I know a decorator who prefers to do cold porcelain but she makes very sure the articles never touch the cake or icing.

I don't know how the flowers and other gumpaste decorations that are not intended to be eaten are regulated. But if these articles are not meant to be eaten, then they might not require a licensed kitchen.
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