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Topsy Turvy Cake FELL!!!! - Page 2

post #16 of 58
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the advice everyone. The reason I'll be calling them on Tuesday is because they asked me to so we could discuss what happened. Given the sister of the groom's email and one I just received about 10 minutes ago from the bride, I'm not totally looking forward to it. (Her email was titled "Saturday's disaster"). I know legally I'm not required to do anything, and while I'm about 99% positive someone was messing with the cake, I can't prove it, and I still feel absolutely HORRIBLE that they had to deal with that on their wedding day! So, tomorrow I'll call up the groom and we'll see how this goes. icon_smile.gif
post #17 of 58
Ok. Don t let them get to you. You fixed the cake. As for what happened, it wasn t your fault. Next time they will pay more attention to the rules. You ll be ok without them if they choose not to use your services anymore. Don t act guilty cause your not. Ok, goodnight!
post #18 of 58
Is there the possibility someone not associated with the bridal group (caterer, D.J., photographer) was present when this happened? I would call the venue and find out (unless you did see some of them present while you were setting up)...then contact them to see what they may have witnessed. I would do this BEFORE you talk to the bride or groom. You may indeed find out there was someone messing with the cake, you may find out there wasn't. I would want to have as much information possible before talking to anyone from the bridal party.
post #19 of 58
Thread Starter 
That's a great idea Deb! I hadn't even thought of that. Thanks!! icon_smile.gif
post #20 of 58
You're very welcome! Best of luck!
post #21 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft

I agree that the OP does not owe this couple anything based on the contract they signed. However, the way you handle adverse events (even if they are not your fault) can set you apart from your competition and turn a negative experience into a positive, which can lead to more orders down the road.

That's why I recommended a proactive apology...it goes above and beyond what is expected, especially once the normal contract liability limitations are reiterated to the customer.



I think that she went above and beyond the call of duty. Extra time, resources. Yep, she's a winner in my book!
If they called, I would say, "I am glad that you called because I was wondering where to send the bill for the extra work". Then see how they respond.
Making life sweet!

Lindas Just Desserts

Inspected and licensed commercial kitchen
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Making life sweet!

Lindas Just Desserts

Inspected and licensed commercial kitchen
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post #22 of 58
I'm sorry you had to go through this but do keep us updated on how this gets resolved. Good luck! icon_smile.gif
post #23 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by debidehm

Is there the possibility someone not associated with the bridal group (caterer, D.J., photographer) was present when this happened? I would call the venue and find out (unless you did see some of them present while you were setting up)...then contact them to see what they may have witnessed. I would do this BEFORE you talk to the bride or groom. You may indeed find out there was someone messing with the cake, you may find out there wasn't. I would want to have as much information possible before talking to anyone from the bridal party.



Great insight and great idea.
"Be kinder than necessary, for everyone you meet is fighting some kind of battle."
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"Be kinder than necessary, for everyone you meet is fighting some kind of battle."
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post #24 of 58
Getting emails from the family is harassment. You have the right to tell the bride that this will stop before you discuss anything further.

You delivered what you agreed to. I sure hope you have a pic of that handprint...

See, there are people who ask for "impossible" cakes and then do their best to get them for free. A six-tier topsy-turvy isn't a design that will stand up to a large bunch of people with alcohol and dancing thrown into the mix.

You should NOT meet or discuss this over the phone. Do it all by email AND CC YOURSELF ON EVERY MESSAGE.
post #25 of 58
One thing about just doing it by email is that you have the hard copy to back you up. However, I have found that sometimes things are misinterpreted when just in an email. It is less likely that someone will get snippy if they are talking to you and they will not "read in" a tone if you speak with them. Then I would back it up, "As per our phone call...." in an email. I do hope that you have pictures or someone from the venue to back up the handprint. Did the planner see it when you looked at the cake? I don't think that you should be responsible for someone else's mistake, but sometimes we have to make concessions just to smooth things over. It's not fair, but it is good PR. I am so sorry that this happened to you. Take a deep breath and relax before you talk to them. Best of luck to you! icon_smile.gif
post #26 of 58
Thread Starter 
So here's where we are at so far:
This morning I called the groom and left a voicemail. Ignored a call from his sister (the one who at the wedding was acting as their wedding planner). And finally I just emailed the bride and groom, with an opener as follows:
" Thank you for your patience in our response; Monday is not a normal working day for us. Our office operates on Tuesday-Thursday, from 11AM-7PM. Please accept our sincerest apologies for the inconvienece you both incurred with the wedding cake. Cake and icing are very delicate materials, and unfortunately accidents after set-up and delivery, while not common, do occur.
Situations like this are covered under our refund policy as well as in your contract under the section "Delivery".

I then went on to quote the refund policy and the Delivery policy, and explained that in accordance with these policies there is no refund due. However, because they are valued clients and we understand how emotional and stressful the situation was for them, we would make an exception and offer a 15% refund of the cake as well as a $350 non-transferable in-store voucher, and waive all repair and re-delivery costs.

So, now we shall wait and see what happens next. icon_smile.gif
post #27 of 58
I'm going to go against popular opinion here...
Can you tell us what type of structure you used to assure that the topsy turvy would continue to stand until disassembled and cut? A cake can look great right after we set it up and everybody is smiling and happy but very slowly start leaning (and eventually fall) if it's not structurally sound inside.
Could the hand print possibly be from someone trying to re-assemble the cake after falling as opposed to someone messing with the cake, making it fall?
post #28 of 58
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the alternating view Diane! That's part of the reason I love coming here to run ideas and get advice so that I can have an overall idea of how to proceed. icon_smile.gif
I used dowels and styrofoam wedge seperators. The bottom three tiers had a dowel straight through. then the next two tiers had a dowel straight through, and then the top tier was on its own. The way the cake fell over, the bottom three tiers were still intact, but the top of those three was smushed. Dowels were still intact. What fell over, were the other two tiers and the top tier. The two tiers were still together with their dowels, just smushed as well, and the top tier was smushed as though someone caught it maybe?
post #29 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by KalisCakes

we would make an exception and offer a 15% refund of the cake as well as a $350 non-transferable in-store voucher, and waive all repair and re-delivery costs.


How much was the cake?
post #30 of 58
I think your offer to them is MORE than generous. I have no idea how much they paid for their cake, but you have gone above and beyond what could be expected of you under the circumstances.

The main thing is that you are happy with what you offered, which I suspect you feel comfortable with, and you are trying to keep a happy customer. Good for you. I hope the rest of this goes very smoothly for you now.
"Be kinder than necessary, for everyone you meet is fighting some kind of battle."
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"Be kinder than necessary, for everyone you meet is fighting some kind of battle."
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