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How do I achieve this look?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
My daughter would like this design for her wedding cake and I'm wondering if you all think this is a fondant covered cake with the fondant/gumpaste cutouts added, or buttercream with fondant/gumpaste cutouts attached? Any tips would also be greatly appreciated! icon_wink.gif
LL
post #2 of 17
Hi,

It could be either or of the two. But, It looks like fondant w/fondant cutouts.
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I can do ALL things Through Christ who strengthens ME!!!
CAKE IS MY LIFE!!!!
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post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by msthang1224

Hi,

It could be either or of the two. But, It looks like fondant w/fondant cutouts.



Thanks Msthang! I was thinking the same thing. I wonder which would hold up better? I have to travel an hour wtih the cake...but, luckily it will be in Feb, and not in heat of summer icon_wink.gif
post #4 of 17
What cutter or cut outs are these to achieve this look? This is beautiful, looks vintage!
post #5 of 17
I have done a cake similar to this and I did fondant with gumpaste cutouts, I ordered some molds from decorate the cake and used an exacto knife to cut out the others and piped royal icing . The molds just take a while.
post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gbbaker

I have done a cake similar to this and I did fondant with gumpaste cutouts, I ordered some molds from decorate the cake and used an exacto knife to cut out the others and piped royal icing . The molds just take a while.



I've seen several lace molds around, but I will check out the ones you mentioned! I think gumpaste attached to the fondant sounds like the perfect way to go too! Thanks for the tips!!!
post #7 of 17
I've done that cake before...It's fondant with fondant cutouts that have been overpiped with royal icing. Some of them are dried so they stand out from the cake a little, and others are applied directly to the cane then overpiped. The only cutters you need are regular flower and leaf cutters.
post #8 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar

I've done that cake before...It's fondant with fondant cutouts that have been overpiped with royal icing. Some of them are dried so they stand out from the cake a little, and others are applied directly to the cane then overpiped. The only cutters you need are regular flower and leaf cutters.



Thank you so much! I thought it looked like there was piping on alot of the flowers and leaves. Very helpful info! Good to know I will only need a minimal amount of cutters icon_wink.gif
post #9 of 17
This is from the description of the cake on the Martha Stewart Weddings site:
"To evoke a hip '60s dress crafted of embroidered lace blanketed with cotton floral appliques, cake designer Ron Ben-Israel created silicone molds of appliques inspired by the original fabric -- no small task considering there were 25 shapes to replicate, including dahlias, roses, and periwinkles. Sugar paste was pressed into each mold, then applied in layers to the fondant. The resulting ivory tower is one that both generations -- yours and your mother's -- will adore."
http://www.marthastewartweddings.com/231247/fabric-inspired-wedding-cakes/@center/272453/wedding-cakes

There. Their. They're not the same.

 

I hope I die before "your" becomes the official contraction of "you are."

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There. Their. They're not the same.

 

I hope I die before "your" becomes the official contraction of "you are."

Reply
post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by shanter

This is from the description of the cake on the Martha Stewart Weddings site:
"To evoke a hip '60s dress crafted of embroidered lace blanketed with cotton floral appliques, cake designer Ron Ben-Israel created silicone molds of appliques inspired by the original fabric -- no small task considering there were 25 shapes to replicate, including dahlias, roses, and periwinkles. Sugar paste was pressed into each mold, then applied in layers to the fondant. The resulting ivory tower is one that both generations -- yours and your mother's -- will adore."
http://www.marthastewartweddings.com/231247/fabric-inspired-wedding-cakes/@center/272453/wedding-cakes



that's a load of crap, those are regular cutters that are overpiped. MS tends to "embellish" details, shall we say.
post #11 of 17
Martha? Embellish? Gracious! icon_smile.gif

There. Their. They're not the same.

 

I hope I die before "your" becomes the official contraction of "you are."

Reply

There. Their. They're not the same.

 

I hope I die before "your" becomes the official contraction of "you are."

Reply
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by shanter

Martha? Embellish? Gracious! icon_smile.gif



heh heh heh icon_rolleyes.gif
post #13 of 17
Thread Starter 
I didn't realize the cake was made by Ron Ben-Israel. I agree Martha does tend to over exagerate. Ha ha I am hoping to make a trial version this week or next, using costumeczars method/instructions : )
post #14 of 17
Good luck with the cake, Debi2. It's really beautiful.
Marianna
"I know my own mind...and it's around here somewhere!"
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Marianna
"I know my own mind...and it's around here somewhere!"
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post #15 of 17
Make sure that you do the cutouts slightly more ivory than the base fondant, that's what sets the design off from the base.
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