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How to make this project legal? - Page 2

post #16 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by MellyT

Quote:
Originally Posted by kelleym

If you stick with cake, frostings, and fillings which do not require refrigeration, the chance of someone getting sick is incredibly low. That is why so many states can pass cottage food laws with minimal regulation for these types of food.



Thanks Kelleym
Swaying away from the original question tho. I use Italian buttercream which can pretty be at room temp. What kinds of cake doesn't require refrigeration? If only I lived in the US icon_sad.gif



IMBC doesn't need refrigeration. Not sure if that is your question is though? Examples of perishables that are generally considered potentially hazardous by most HDs are whipped cream, cheesecakes and custards.
post #17 of 21
Thread Starter 
IMBC doesn't need refrigeration. Not sure if that is your question is though? Examples of perishables that are generally considered potentially hazardous by most HDs are whipped cream, cheesecakes and custards.[/quote]

oh pardon me.
I meant to say.. what type of cake bases don't need refrigeration?
I typically use cakes that do require eggs and sometimes milk icon_smile.gif

good thing none of my products use what you mentioned above icon_biggrin.gif
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by FromScratchSF


IMBC doesn't need refrigeration. Not sure if that is your question is though? Examples of perishables that are generally considered potentially hazardous by most HDs are whipped cream, cheesecakes and custards.


All recipes are different of course, but you might be interested to know that last year I sent 8 recipe samples off to a food lab for pH and aW testing (the standard that determines whether or not a food item is non-potentially hazardous), and the recipe I sent for IMBC came back potentially hazardous, ie: it requires time and temperature control, and cannot be used by cottage food operators in our state.

MellyT, here is a list of the recipes which tested non-potentially hazardous. SMBC was one of them, so you might want to try this recipe if you don't want to use an American style buttercream.
http://texascottagefoodlaw.com/Resources/Recipes.aspx

Generally all American-style buttercreams (butter and/or shortening, and powdered sugar + liquid and flavorings) will be ok. You can find the one on the Wilton site by googling "Wilton class buttercream" and there are a million variations of that recipe, including a popular one here on CC called Buttercream Dream.

Cakes, cookies, bread, brownies, and other baked items are generally non-potentially hazardous due to their low water content and high acidity.

Fruit fillings would be ok, as well as any of the fillings you can purchase commercially that come in a sleeve such as these. http://www.countrykitchensa.com/whatshot/pastry.aspx

You should not use a homemade filling such as mousse, pastry cream, or whipped cream.

There are many, many different options available to you. It is no big deal to make a non-potentially hazardous wedding cake icon_smile.gif

ETA: So many edits because the server is possibly trying to drive me insane with its timeouts and double, triple posts. It's taken me 25 minutes to add 2 words to this post.
post #19 of 21
MellyT, here is a list of the recipes which tested non-potentially hazardous.

Thanks so much for posting that link! I was amazed to see the traditional cream cheese frosting on the list on non-potentially hazardous recipes. I have probably read more threads about the hazards of such a recipe than any other on this website. I started a few myself trying to find a way to safely travel with a cake iced in this.
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post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by ziggytarheel

MellyT, here is a list of the recipes which tested non-potentially hazardous.

Thanks so much for posting that link! I was amazed to see the traditional cream cheese frosting on the list on non-potentially hazardous recipes. I have probably read more threads about the hazards of such a recipe than any other on this website. I started a few myself trying to find a way to safely travel with a cake iced in this.


Yes, I have found that there is a lot of confusion surrounding the science of what makes an item potentially hazardous or not. A lot of people will say "Well, it has _____ (milk, eggs, cream cheese, etc) in it, so you have to keep it in the refrigerator; when in reality, it is not a single ingredient that is the determining factor, but rather the overall pH and aW. Most people tend to approach these things with an overabundance of caution, which is admirable! But years ago on Baking Nine One One, Sarah got a food scientist to start giving her opinions on which recipes needed to be refrigerated. One of the recipes was very similar to my cream cheese frosting, and the scientist said, "that's probably ok to leave out", which got me thinking. This year when the Texas cottage food law passed, a friend of mine located a lab in Texas which would test samples, so we had a great time making recipes for testing. The ones that came back NPH are the ones you see on the web site. The ones that came back potentially hazardous (requiring refrigeration and therefore not eligible for sale under the cottage food law) were IMBC and German Chocolate cake filling (the recipe with coconut, pecans, egg yolks, sugar, and condensed milk).
post #21 of 21
Thanks, again for this great information. I've always understood that a little milk with a lot of powdered sugar was okay, but people have been scaring me about cream cheese! Of course, for years before that, I would leave my carrot cake with this very icing out on the counter for a couple of days and never thought a thing about it. icon_smile.gif I think I will still be extra cautious when serving this to people with weakened immune systems, but I feel better about what I would normally do. (I don't sell anything I make.)
"To laugh often and to love much..., to appreciate beauty, to find the best in others, to give one's self..., this is to have succeeded."
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Reply
"To laugh often and to love much..., to appreciate beauty, to find the best in others, to give one's self..., this is to have succeeded."
Ralph Waldo Emerson
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