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SPS System - is this Single Plate Seperator?

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
Never heard of it. Just did a search. So is this a plate you use to stack your tiers instead of a cardboard? And use the hidden pillars cut to fit? I a doing a 4 tier square stacked cake and don't want any space between my tiers. I would love some details on this method of stacking. Thanks!
post #2 of 6
Separator plates have a little raised point in the center so your cake is perfectly aligned and held in place. The weight of the entire cake is displaced on the bottom board, not on each tier so it's much more stable and disaster-proof. You still use cardboards but before you even start, make sure and line up your cardboards with each separator plate to mark a hole in the middle of each cardboard. Then stack and fill your layers as normal, making sure each tier is exactly the same size as the pillars (usually 4").

With your largest tier in place on the serving board, take the next-size tier separator plate and press gently into the top center of the bottom cake to mark where the pillars will go. Then insert the pillars into the separator plate and push into the bottom tier. Slide your next-size cake onto the separator plate, feeling the little raised piece "click" into the hole you previously punched in the cardboard. This prevents it from moving around and there is no need for doweling.

I transported a five-tier cake down the roughest road in the county this summer and it worked like a charm.

Not sure if you've seen this one but it basically explains everything I've just said in greater detail and with photos icon_smile.gif Good luck!
http://media.cakecentral.com/files/sps_104.pdf
post #3 of 6
Separator plates have a little raised point in the center so your cake is perfectly aligned and held in place. The weight of the entire cake is displaced on the bottom board, not on each tier so it's much more stable and disaster-proof. You still use cardboards but before you even start, make sure and line up your cardboards with each separator plate to mark a hole in the middle of each cardboard. Then stack and fill your layers as normal, making sure each tier is exactly the same size as the pillars (usually 4").

With your largest tier in place on the serving board, take the next-size tier separator plate and press gently into the top center of the bottom cake to mark where the pillars will go. Then insert the pillars into the separator plate and push into the bottom tier. Slide your next-size cake onto the separator plate, feeling the little raised piece "click" into the hole you previously punched in the cardboard. This prevents it from moving around and there is no need for doweling.

I transported a five-tier cake down the roughest road in the county this summer and it worked like a charm.

Not sure if you've seen this one but it basically explains everything I've just said in greater detail and with photos icon_smile.gif Good luck!
http://media.cakecentral.com/files/sps_104.pdf
post #4 of 6
Separator plates have a little raised point in the center so your cake is perfectly aligned and held in place. The weight of the entire cake is displaced on the bottom board, not on each tier so it's much more stable and disaster-proof. You still use cardboards but before you even start, make sure and line up your cardboards with each separator plate to mark a hole in the middle of each cardboard. Then stack and fill your layers as normal, making sure each tier is exactly the same size as the pillars (usually 4").

With your largest tier in place on the serving board, take the next-size tier separator plate and press gently into the top center of the bottom cake to mark where the pillars will go. Then insert the pillars into the separator plate and push into the bottom tier. Slide your next-size cake onto the separator plate, feeling the little raised piece "click" into the hole you previously punched in the cardboard. This prevents it from moving around and there is no need for doweling.

I transported a five-tier cake down the roughest road in the county this summer and it worked like a charm.

Not sure if you've seen this one but it basically explains everything I've just said in greater detail and with photos icon_smile.gif Good luck!
http://media.cakecentral.com/files/sps_104.pdf
post #5 of 6
Separator plates have a little raised point in the center so your cake is perfectly aligned and held in place. The weight of the entire cake is displaced on the bottom board, not on each tier so it's much more stable and disaster-proof. You still use cardboards but before you even start, make sure and line up your cardboards with each separator plate to mark a hole in the middle of each cardboard. Then stack and fill your layers as normal, making sure each tier is exactly the same size as the pillars (usually 4").

With your largest tier in place on the serving board, take the next-size tier separator plate and press gently into the top center of the bottom cake to mark where the pillars will go. Then insert the pillars into the separator plate and push into the bottom tier. Slide your next-size cake onto the separator plate, feeling the little raised piece "click" into the hole you previously punched in the cardboard. This prevents it from moving around and there is no need for doweling.

I transported a five-tier cake down the roughest road in the county this summer and it worked like a charm.

Not sure if you've seen this one but it basically explains everything I've just said in greater detail and with photos icon_smile.gif Good luck!
http://media.cakecentral.com/files/sps_104.pdf
post #6 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Susieindy

So is this a plate you use to stack your tiers instead of a cardboard? And use the hidden pillars cut to fit?



Yes, SPS = Single Plate Separators by Bakery Craft.
The "hidden pillars" refers to a similar system by Wilton.
There are other brands, like Coast, for construction with the same concept.
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