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Uncovered wedding cake - no BC or fondant - would you?

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
I saw this was Hilary Duff's wedding cake and got a request for it. Would you do a cake uncovered with BC of fondant or have you done something like this? Will the cake dry out with exposure to air and an air conditioned room? What are your thoughts on doing this for a wedding?
LL
post #2 of 21
I think if you start out with moist cake and keep it wrapped until set up, it would be fine. Maybe an apricot glaze would help.
post #3 of 21
Since cakes are delivered one hour before the reception starts and not cut until way after dinner has been served, the uncovered cake could be in the air - drying out for 7 hours or more. If the bride insists on an uncovered cake, draw up a form for her to sign - taking full responsibility for the cakes dryness (or condition) so that she can't come back on you later with a complaint. If this doesn't scare her into changing her mind then go ahead and make the cake but infuse it with a wash to increase moistness that may evaporate. I do the signature page with deliveries (when the bride wants to pick up her own wedding cake), when faced with a document, they usually come to their senses. (some of the time). icon_smile.gif
post #4 of 21
I wouldn't have a problem-if it were a moist type of cake to start with. If it has cured and been covered, it should be fine to serve.
Making life sweet!

Lindas Just Desserts

Inspected and licensed commercial kitchen
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Making life sweet!

Lindas Just Desserts

Inspected and licensed commercial kitchen
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post #5 of 21
I don't think the cake will dry out so much that it becomes unpalatable.
post #6 of 21
I refused to do them. I made moist cakes but as Denise said, most cakes can sit some 3-8 hours before being served. ANY cake, moist or not would dry out in that time frame.
post #7 of 21
I'd think kept well covered until set up, and not left exposed too long on display, it would probably be OK............

but, that said, I wouldn't really want to have it served to me--and I'm NOT a big icing eater.

I think brides who latch onto something like this are being unfair to their guests. If the bride doesn't like icing, then she can scrape it off. Why punish the rest of the guests?

If she'll pay you for it--and sign off on something stating that she's aware that a lack of external icing coat may result in a less than optimal product if left exposed for an extended period of time AND that there will be no refunds for any complaints----then it's a VERY easy cake icon_lol.gif

Really, sometimes "different" isn't all that attractive.........and this cake is a case in point.

I'd be very tempted to add a tent card to the table that said, "Yes, it IS supposed to be this way. The baker DID NOT run out of time OR icing!"

Rae
I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
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I love you, but your emergency is not my crisis!

They say that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance.--Terry Pratchett (b.194
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post #8 of 21
I think it's ugly, but if a client wants it and you let them know that there is a concern that it might dry out, go for it.

notice in the picture how they put flowers everywhere to distract you by how ugly the cake can look. Maybe it's a good cake for an ugly bride.
post #9 of 21
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the responses. I do have a lot to think about with this one and need to be honest with the bride. Do you think a mud cake would be best suited for this type of naked cake since it is known to last the longest?
post #10 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakesCakes


If she'll ... sign off on something stating that she's aware that a lack of external icing coat may result in a less than optimal product if left exposed for an extended period of time AND that there will be no refunds for any complaints----then it's a VERY easy cake icon_lol.gif



I agree. If the bride wants a cake like that, sure...go ahead! I wouldn't lose a bit of sleep over whether or not it will be "dry"; it's what she wants. However, I would definitely prepare a contract with these words at the beginning of the contract in BOLD, LARGE PRINT and say that once payment in full has been received (no less than 4 weeks prior to the wedding), that no changes to design are possible.

I, _________________________, am aware that the lack of an external icing coat may result in a less than optimal product once put on display. I am further aware that this design is my request and that there will be no refunds issued for any complaints. I am aware that once payment is full has been received by _______________________ (baker), no later than _________ weeks prior to the event, that no design changes are possible.

____________________________ (Buyer's Signature & Date)

-------------------------
At the tasting, I would provide two 6" round cakes with filling (exactly as shown on the top tier) that are made exactly as you would make the wedding cake and make sure they are exposed to the air (no covering) for a minimum of 4 hours. The bride can try a slice and see if that is what she wants. (Charge for the two 6" cakes for the tasting.)
post #11 of 21
I have done unfrosted cakes and make sure every layer is simple syruped. I have wrapped the sides with plastic wrap and not had a problem(removing plastic wrap before transporting).
No one has ever said the cake was dry(scratch recipes).
post #12 of 21
/\\/\\/\\/\\/\\/\\/\\/\\ This

Use simple syrup, especially at the edges. Wrap in plastic wrap or acetate. You could even bring some simple syrup in a mister and give it a hit right before you leave. Put everything in the contract. I don't see a problem with this.
post #13 of 21
Thread Starter 
Ok thanks everyone.
post #14 of 21
I scrolled up to cut off the flowers and yeah it does look ugly. It looks like a cake that has been filled and needs to be crumb coated and frosted. Simple syrup like others should help a bit with the drying. A moist cake is essential as well.
post #15 of 21
Thread Starter 
Do these look like real or artificial roses on the cake? I wonder if they have any wax paper under the flowers to protect the cake. What do you think about non-sugar flowers resting on the cake? Is this okay for artificial flowers?
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