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piping with candy melts

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Is it possible to melt candy melts and pipe with them? I'd like to try to make some coral this way for a seashell wedding cake. How would I go about it?
post #2 of 7
Just put the candy melts in a disposable piping bag and clip the tip off, then melt them in the microwave for 20 seconds, then knead the bag, 20 more seconds, knead, etc, until they're melted. Don't overheat it or you can really burn yourself. That would work for the fan coral.

This is another way to make other kinds of coral. If you do a variety it looks better! http://acaketorememberva.blogspot.com/search?q=coral
post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
Thanks for your help. You've given me alot lately! I think I'll go with the royal icing and follow your instructions in your blog. I'll also pipe some with a pattern. Just one question, what is confectioner's glaze? Do you have to use it once they are finished?

I looked at your web-site and your cakes are really beautiful!!! I'll be checking out more in your blog for sure! It's amazing the things you can find on cc, so much help you never knew existed.

May I ask , who is the picture of in your avatar? Thanks again.
post #4 of 7
That's Cheap Trick! My favorite rock group other than the Beatles icon_smile.gif

You don't need to use confectioner's glaze...It's a shellac-y kind of stuff that gives a shiny finish to gumpaste flowers and leaves, but it's really toxic-smelling and I don't use it often. I think that I used it for the coral because it seemed like something that would kind of bind it all together and still be edible. I wrote about it on my blog, too (I've been writing the blog for a few years, so I've covered a lot of topics icon_rolleyes.gif ) http://acaketorememberva.blogspot.com/2011/03/fun-with-confectioners-glaze.html
post #5 of 7
I saw this done at a show. The decorator filled a dish with the smallest white candy beads - the smaller the better (teeny-tiny). Then she piped white chocolate right onto the bed of beads in the form of coral - then covered the piece in extra beads and inserted a tooth pick up through the bottom of each piece. Took just a few minutes to dry and when lifted up out of the beads, looked exactly like real coral.
post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeniseNH

I saw this done at a show. The decorator filled a dish with the smallest white candy beads - the smaller the better (teeny-tiny). Then she piped white chocolate right onto the bed of beads in the form of coral - then covered the piece in extra beads and inserted a tooth pick up through the bottom of each piece. Took just a few minutes to dry and when lifted up out of the beads, looked exactly like real coral.



that's an excellent idea!
post #7 of 7
Once melted choco can be very 'flowing'. Elaine Gonsolez (I'm sure I totally mis-spelled that name!) has a book out (from yrs ago) all about working w/choco. I say her demo how once your choco is melted you add a *drop* or 2 of water to thicken it up just enough that it doesn't totally/loosely flow out but is more controlable. You know how getting water in choco makes it size... Well when you are careful it will tighten loose choc just enough.
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